Dr. Edward Tronick: How Discord and Repair Build Resiliency in Relationships - Part 2
Play • 36 min

Karen welcomes the esteemed Dr. Edward Tronick of the University of Massachusetts - Boston, conductor of the famed Still Face Experiment, to the show for part one of their two part conversation about his new book, The Power of Discord: Why the Ups and Downs of Relationships Are the Secret to Building Intimacy, Resilience, and Trust. On December 1st and 8th, Karen will have a two-part conversation with Dr. Tronick's co-author on the Power of Discord, Dr. Claudia Gold.

Ed Tronick is a developmental and clinical psychologist. Professor Tronick is a University Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, is director of the Child Development Unit, a research associate in Newborn Medicine, a lecturer at Harvard Medical School, an associate professor at both the Graduate School of Education and the School of Public Health at Harvard. With Kristie Brandt, Dorothy Richardson, Marilyn Davillier he has created an Infant-Parent Mental Health Post Graduate Certificate Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He has developed the Newborn Behavioral Assessment Scale and the Touchpoints Project with T.B. Brazelton. He developed the Still-face paradigm.

Change Academy
Change Academy
Brock Armstrong & Monica Reinagel
Why We Say Yes
When we are trying to change an unwanted behavior, we often get so focused on trying to find ways to say no to it that we miss the step of understanding why we say yes to it in the first place. While learning how to say no is a valuable skill (and one we’ll look at in a future episode), understanding why we say yes can ultimately be more important and more effective than just getting better at saying no ourselves. Takeaways: There are times when simply getting better at saying no to yourself (or your inner toddler) is the perfect thing to practice. But when saying no becomes unsustainable and you find yourself rebelling more often than you are succeeding, it is time to take a closer look. The reasons we give ourselves for choosing an undesired behavior are often rooted in some cognitive distortions or at least wishful thinking. By identifying why we say yes to something that we should say no to (or vice versa) we can start to dismantle our faulty thinking and develop the skills to stay on track with ease. Lab Experiment: Think about the reasons why you say yes to a certain behavior. Make a list of: * What you think this behavior gives you or how it benefits you. * The reasons others (friends, media, society) give for why people indulge in (or abstain from) this behavior. * How you feel about others who exhibit this behavior. Reflect on how you feel about this behavior now that you understand it from more angles. And keep this list handy for the next time you feel like saying NO isn’t going to cut it.
25 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
224: Ask David: TEAM Treatment for Stress, Severe OCD, "General" Depression, and more!
Podcast 224 Ask David January 11, 2021 Ask David featuring more challenging and interesting questions. * Josh asks: What are the most effective types of psychotherapy homework assignments? * Hassam asks: How would you treat my severe OCD? Exposure doesn’t seem to be working! And Joe asks: Would you say that the secret to overcoming OCD is willpower? * Ted asks: Does any psychiatric disorder result from a chemical imbalance in the brain? * Brian W. asks: Burns, could you do a video on how to use CBT for stress? Thanks. * Clarity asks: Is it too late to be a beta tester for your app? * Simon asks: Is there a podcast that you can recommend for general depression, and how to find out what is wrong? * Stephanie asks: My patients don’t recover as rapidly as your patients. Am I doing something wrong? I’m feeling a lot of anxiety and self-doubt! * * * * Josh asks: What are the most effective types of psychotherapy homework assignments? Hi David, thanks for all your work. It has been very helpful. You mention That doing homework is essential to recovery from anxiety and depression. Any homework you recommend? I am going to buy a few of your books and have the worksheets from the Neil Sattin podcast. Anything else that will benefit? Josh Hi Josh, It depends on the type of problem you are working on. I can work up an answer, perhaps, if you want to tell me! I did not hear from Josh, but Rhonda and I summarize the best kids of psychotherapy homework for: * * depression * anxiety * relationship problems * * * * Hassam asks: How would you treat my severe OCD? Exposure doesn’t seem to be working! Hi David, I love your work on the podcast. I have not yet found a copy of any of your books in Lahore (where I live), but I have grown to understand your philosophy through your podcasts. Episode 162 disturbed me a little. I suffer from severe OCD and its cousin, depression. And the "high-speed cure" in the title really attracted me. But I had buyer's remorse. Why? Because it does not work like that for most people. The guest on your show, had a few exposures, and BAM, cured. I have tried exposure many many times, and it very minimally helps in lowering the threat of the obsessions. I feel that this was a Magic Pill kind of account, and at the risk of judging a person's pain, I think your guest had a relatively mild (as compared to me) OCD. I would really love it if you could talk about Pure OCD (the type I have), and how it can be resistant to exposure. The intrusive thoughts/obsessions continue to be extremely, EXTREMELY, painful. This "high speed cure" idea seems dismissive of the seriousness of my condition. Please keep up the great work. And I hope to read your books one day. Thanks Hassam (Therapist in training) Thanks Hassam, sometimes, therapy is much harder, as you say! Good point. I often get slammed when I present patients who recover rapidly, especially patients who have had incapacitating symptoms for years or even decades of failed therapy. This is disappointing to me, as my goal is to bring hope to people that rapid and meaningful change IS possible. To be honest, I don’t like it when I get slammed for presenting cases of rapid recovery. Some people think I am a con artist! Yikes! Of course, everyone is different, and some people will be more challenging to treat. One thing I learned when I was in private practice is that you can never tell ahead of time who will recover rapidly and who will take much more time. I’ve had patients I thought would be super easy to treat who responded much slowly than I predicted, and many who I thought would be nearly impossible to treat who responded almost overnight. You’ve mentioned that exposure has been of limited value for you. I totally agree and saw that early in my treatment of anxiety that exposure alone is often quite ineffective. That’s why I argue so strongly that exposure is not a treatment for OCD or for any form of anxiety. It is just one tool among many I use in the treatment of anxiety. I use four very different treatment models with every anxious patient: * * The Cognitive Model * The Motivational Model * The Hidden Emotion Model * The Behavioral (Exposure) Model Unless you understand and use all four models, the prognosis might be somewhat guarded, as you’ve discovered. In contrast, when you use all four strategies, your chances for success increase tremendously. For example, prior to using Exposure in the episode you listened to, I spent about 25 minutes with Sara using the motivational and cognitive models, which really helped. Focusing on one method alone will often not be terribly effective, especially if you’re looking rapid, complete, and lasting recovery. However, occasionally one method will work, so therapists and patients alike get focused on some single approach they’ve learned, thinking they’ve found “the answer.” There’s a great deal of information on the treatment of anxiety disorders using these four models on my website, www.feelinggood.com. I often urge listeners to use the search function on my website, and everything will be served up to you immediately. You can learn all about these four powerful models. In addition, if you were looking for more techniques, you might want to take a look at my book, When Panic Attacks, which describes 40 potent anti-anxiety techniques. You can order it from Amazon. My psychotherapy eBook, Tools, Not Schools, of Therapy, might also be helpful for therapists who want to learn more about the treatment of depression and anxiety with TEAM. It is an eBook, and order forms are available on my website, www.feelinggood.com, in the resources tab, and also in my store. Thanks for your excellent question! david And Joe asks: Would you say that the secret to overcoming OCD is willpower? In reply to Joe. I use four treatment models in the treatment of all anxiety disorders, including OCD. Certainly, the willingness to use Exposure is required, but Exposure is only one of many helpful methods for OCD. You can search for anxiety treatment on my website, and you’ll find many good podcasts. Also, there is a free anxiety class on my website. My book, When Panic Attacks, is another great resource with more than 40 techniques to combat all forms of anxiety, including OCD. You can find all my books on AMAZON, or on the books page on my website. david * * * * Ted asks: Does any psychiatric disorder result from a chemical imbalance in the brain? Hi Dr. Burns, It says in your book, When Panic Attacks, p. 49, 3rd paragraph, you said that there's not a shred of evidence that there's any chemical imbalance for any psychiatric disorder. Does that include schizophrenia or bipolar or OCD? Haldol works for me for schizoaffective....controls dopamine in brain? Ted Hi Ted, There are likely one or more biological factors that contribute to schizophrenia as well as full blown bipolar disorder (with true manic episodes.) We do not yet know what those causes are. However, the brain is not a hydraulic system of chemical balances and imbalances, or perhaps more like a supercomputer. I am not aware of any neuroscientists who believe in the crude “chemical imbalance” theory. We simply don’t know what the causes are. Meds can definitely help with the symptoms of schizophrenia and mania as well. This tells us nothing about causes. Aspirin can help with a headache, but headaches are not due to an “aspirin deficiency” in the brain. Computers often crash, but I’ve never heard of a computer problem that was caused by a “silicon imbalance” in the chips. Hope that helps. Psychotherapy can definitely help with feelings of depression and anxiety, but is not a cure for schizophrenia or mania. I would hate to have to treat any psychiatric problem with drugs alone! I like to treat humans, not “diagnoses,” but it can helpful to be aware of diagnoses like schizop…
1 hr 4 min
Therapy in a Nutshell
Therapy in a Nutshell
tinpodcast
Change the World with One Skill: World Mental Health Day Find a Way #WithMe
Hello everyone, Today is World Mental Health Day, Right now around a billion people experience a mental illness or a substance abuse disorder and depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide. But the solution sometimes seems overwhelming. So it’s needless to say that mental Illness is a big problem for many people. And the causes are complex, from biology to experience to how we think and act, and in my opinion depression and anxiety are often caused by a lot of tiny little thoughts or behaviors that we don’t even notice, but over time these pile up. But the research is clear, most mental illness is treatable, we can change how we feel, we can improve mental health and fight depression and anxiety by changing how we think and changing how we act and seeking professional and medical support. Sign up for my Newsletter: https://www.therapynutshell.com Thanks BetterHelp for sponsoring the video: BetterHelp- Professional, Affordable Online Counseling starting at around $65 a week https://www.betterhelp.com/therapyina... My Intensive Mental Health Courses are now on Teachable! Change your Brain: Mental Health and Neuroplasticity Course: https://therapyinanutshell.teachable.... Coping Skills and Self-Care for Mental Health Course: https://therapyinanutshell.teachable.... FREE! Grounding Skills Course: https://therapyinanutshell.teachable.... How to Help Course: Practical Skills to help Loved ones with Mental Illness: https://therapyinanutshell.teachable.... Check Out My Favorite Books for Mental Health: https://kit.co/TherapyinaNutshell/bes... Music licensed from www.Bensound.com or Artlist.io Images from Freepik.com (premium license), Pixabay, or Wikimedia commons Therapy in a Nutshell, and the information provided by Emma McAdam, is solely intended for informational and entertainment purposes and is not a substitute for advice, diagnosis, or treatment regarding medical or mental health conditions. Although Emma McAdam is a licensed marriage and family therapist, the views expressed on this site or any related content should not be taken for medical or psychiatric advice. Always consult your physician before making any decisions related to your physical or mental health. If you are in crisis please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ or 1-800-273-TALK (8255), or your local emergency services. Copyright Therapy in a Nutshell, LLC
5 min
Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban
Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban
Melissa Urban
Hypothangry | Dr. Vickie Bhatia
Hypothangry: Imagining a hypothetical confrontation, then playing out the fight you’d hypothetically have with that person inside your own brain. Fantasy fights are often conducted with loved ones or friends, but can occur with total strangers. (See: “hypothetically angry,” the cousin-once-removed of “rehearsing disaster.”) Today, licensed clinical psychologist and Whole30 Certified Coach Dr. Vickie Bhatia comes back to the podcast to unpack why we create hypothetical situations in our head and then get mad about them in real life. We’ll discuss how relationships, trauma, uncertainty, and judgment factor in; where anger really comes from and whether anger is helpful or harmful; the two most common triggers for hypothangry scenarios; and a plan for identifying, interrupting, and moving on gracefully from this behavior.  Continue the conversation with me @melissau on Instagram. If you have a question for Dear Melissa or a topic idea for the show, leave me a voicemail at (321) 209-1480. Do the Thing is part of The Onward Project, a family of podcasts brought together by Gretchen Rubin—all about how to make your life better. Check out the other Onward Project podcasts—Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Side Hustle School, Happier in Hollywood, and Everything Happens with Kate Bowler . If you liked this episode, please subscribe, leave a 5-star review, and tell your friends to Do the Thing! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
43 min
Therapy Chat
Therapy Chat
Laura Reagan, LCSW-C
260: How Psychedelic Medicine Can Help In Trauma Recovery with Saj Razvi
Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In today’s episode, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C interviews Saj Razvi, LPC, a clinician and director of education for the Psychedelic Somatic Institute. Listen in for a fascinating discussion on how psychedelics can help us go deeper in the process of healing trauma. Saj explains how psychedelics help us access different states of consciousness and why this matters in therapy for complex trauma. He explains the various models of psychedelic assisted trauma therapy and how Psychedelic Somatic Institute teaches therapists to legally provide psychotherapy to clients using psychedelic medicine in private practice settings, and how this contributes to greater access to these healing medicines than has been available previously. Resources * Register here (affiliate link) for a webinar to learn more about PSI's training * Read the White Paper that was recently published in the Journal of Psychedelic Psychiatry * Check out the PSI website: https://psychedelicsomatic.org * Listen to episode 218, Laura's interview with Dr. Craig Heacock on his work in the MAPS studies with MDMA. * Sign up to be the first to know when registration for Laura's Trauma Therapist Consultation groups opens in February 2021! Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button. Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here. Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio
36 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
180. Choosing to Live Your Values
It’s only the second week of the New Year, and many of us have already failed at (or given up on) achieving our New Year’s Resolutions. We often rely on sheer willpower to achieve these types of goals. However, willpower simply isn’t enough. On this week’s episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Diana and Benjamin Schoendorff, co-author of The Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix and The ACT Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Compassion, discuss the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) matrix. The matrix is a complex therapeutic tool used to help clients contact experiences which keep them from living in ways that serve their values. In this episode, Benjamin breaks down the ACT matrix in a way that is accessible for all. Grab a cup of coffee, and join us to learn, practice, and grow today! Listen and Learn: Diana and Yael’s take on the ACT matrix, what it is, and how it’s helped them to live in ways that serve their values Benji’s expert definition of psychological flexibility  Some practical exercises you can use to become more psychologically flexible right now Benji’s breakdown of each quadrant in the matrix and what they represent  About Diana’s personal experience working through the matrix How the ACT matrix can be helpful for couples, parents, organizations, achieving New Years Resolutions, and much more! What the “Dead Man Rule” is and how it might be impacting your mental health Why values are often more important than willpower when it comes to achieving your goals What ‘loops’ and ‘hooks’ are and how we get stuck in them (and how to behave in service of your values instead!) Benji’s personal explanation of how moving through the ACT matrix influenced his spiritual practice Resources: Books Benji co-authored, The Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix : A Step-by-Step Approach to Using the Act Matrix Model in Clinical Practice and The ACT Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Compassion: Tools for Fostering Psychological Flexibility Paperback – Illustrated, December 1, 2014  Connect with The Contextual Psychology Institute  Read more on what the ACT matrix is (and see what it looks like) here: https://contextualscience.org/act_matrix  Register for Diana’s free, weekly meditation course here: https://drdianahill.com/tuesday-teachings/  Sign up for POTC’s First Annual Wise Minds Summit: How to Adapt and Thrive in Today’s Challenging Times About Benjamin Schoendorff: Benji Schoendorff Benjamin Schoendorff is a licensed psychologist and international trainer living near Montreal. Benji has a passion for helping people get unstuck and move toward valued living and travels the world over to train clinicians from all backgrounds in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP). In addition to his clinical and training practice, he currently researches ACT in the treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder as part of the Montreal university mental health institute. As an author and trainer, Benji is renowned for his down-to-earth, authentic, relationship-centered and deeply compassionate style. He believes effective science-based methods to get unstuck are too precious to remain confined to academia and has made it his life mission to disseminate them in an engaging and easily accessible way. Simple, but not simplistic. Benji dreams of a scientific psychology in the service of spreading love, peace and understanding. He has written books and chapters in French and English including co-authoring The Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix and The ACT Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Compassion. Episode 116. Building a Meaningful, Values-based Life with Dr. Jenna LeJeune Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes Episode 167. Get Curious and Change Unhealthy Habits with Dr. Judson Brewer Episode 77. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Dr. Jill Stoddard
1 hr 3 min
The One You Feed
The One You Feed
Eric Zimmer|Wondery
370: Dr. Jud Brewer on Habits to Heal Anxiety
Dr. Jud Brewer is a thought leader in the field of habit change and the science of self-mastery. He is the Director of Research and Innovation at the Mindfulness Center and associate professor in psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Brown University.  In this episode, Eric and Dr. Jud talk about his book, Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind and they explore something called the Habit Loop, using it to understand and heal difficult emotions like anxiety. If you’d like to start out this new year restoring some balance and putting some healthy habits in place, or if you’re tired of waiting for the right circumstances to make progress towards your goals, Eric, as a behavior coach, can help you.  To book a free, no-pressure 30-minute call with Eric to see if working with him in The One You Feed Personal Transformation Program is right for you, click here. But wait – there’s more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It’s that simple and we’ll give you good stuff as a thank you! In This Interview, Dr. Jud Brewer and I discuss Habits for Healing Anxiety and… * His book, Unwinding Anxiety: New Science Shows How to Break the Cycles of Worry and Fear to Heal Your Mind * Reward-Based Learning * Trigger, Behavior, Result * The Habit Loop * Addiction defined as continued use despite adverse consequences * Habits: Set and Forget * How if we don’t pay attention to how rewarding the habit is right now, we can’t change the behavior * How to heal anxiety as well as emotional eating using the Habit Loop * The role of curiosity in healing anxiety * Learning to be with difficult emotions and learning to allow them to pass * How to remember to be mindful throughout the day Dr. Jud Brewer Links: drjud.com Instagram Twitter Green Chef: The first USDA Certified Organic Meal Kit Company that makes eating well easy and affordable. Go to www.greenchef.com/wolf90 and use code WOLF90 to get $90 off including free shipping. Peloton: Of course the bike is an incredible workout, but did you know that on the Peloton app, you can also take yoga, strength training, stretching classes, and so much more? If you download the Peloton App today through January 30, 2021 you get 2 free months free!  Kettle & Fire: Bone Broth and soups carefully crafted by world-class chefs, made with the best whole ingredients and the bones of humanely raised animals delivered right to your door. Go to www.kettleandfire.com/wolf and use promo code WOLF for 20% off. If you enjoyed this conversation with Dr. Jud Brewer on Habits for Healing Anxiety, you might also enjoy these other episodes: Dr. Jud Brewer on Addiction and the Craving Mind (August, 2018) BJ Fogg on Tiny Habits James Clear on Compounding Nature of Habits-Part 1 James Clear on Compounding Nature of Habits-Part 2
59 min
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