Dr. Angela Cusimano: Does Divorce Impact Attachment? - Part 1
Play • 26 min

Karen welcomes Dr. Angela Cusimano to the show for part one of their discussion on the impact of divorce on attachment. Part two will be released on Tuesday, January 19th.

Angela Cusimano is a psychologist and personal coach with decades of experience working with kids, families, and trauma survivors. She is a childhood divorce survivor and has dedicated most of her career to helping struggling kids and families. As a way to connect with a greater number of people outside of the therapy room, she has started a coaching program specifically for childhood divorce survivors who struggle with self-love, self-sabotage, and difficulties in their partnerships. She offers group and individual coaching programs and has published a book for families going through the divorce process which can be found on Amazon and a book for parents who want to safely raise their teens in the digital age.

Two Shrinks Pod
Two Shrinks Pod
Dr Hunter Mulcare & Amy Donaldson
68 - The Seven Deadly Sins
To kick off 2021, two shrinks is getting sinful. Thanks to a suggestion from psychiatrist Dr Jackie Rakov (@psychwrite on twitter), we’re taking a look at the psychology behind the seven deadly sins. Do we find people more attractive when we’re primed with lust? Does envy make us more likely to harm others? Is pride different from straight-up narcissism? Listen in to for a light-hearted but in depth look at whether the sins really are that bad. Timepoint/Articles: 05:30 Envy https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167219897660 14:30 Pride - https://europepmc.org/article/med/33180528 26:25 Gluttony - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24411760/ 40:58 Sloth - https://www.prdb.pk/article/prevalence-of-academic-procrastination-and-reasons-for-acade-8348 47:30 Lust - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00224545.2014.933158 58:51 Wrath - https://bpspsychub.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjso.12357 01:14:27 Greed - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0191886918305130 Media clips drawn from: Se7en (sins), Winnie the Pooh (gluttony), The Simpsons (Sloth), U2 (pride) Pride & Prejudice (pride), How I Met Your Mother (lust), Wallstreet (greed) and Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan (wrath) Hunter’s bonus I can’t believe it’s not sloth articles: (from 35:00-40:58 mins) Sloth bears: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2019-05979-001 Bridges: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1369847820304125
1 hr 27 min
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Healthline Media
Steven C. Hayes - What is ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy)?
What is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)? Is it just for select issues or can everyone benefit from ACT? Is there any evidence to support that ACT works at all? Dr. Steven C. Hayes, one of the pioneers of ACT, answers these questions and shares some of the interesting applications of ACT, ranging from helping professional athletes to Fortune 500 companies. Listen now! Guest Information for 'Acceptance and Commitment' Podcast Episode Steven C. Hayes is a Nevada Foundation professor of psychology in the behavior analysis program at the University of Nevada. An author of 46 books and nearly 650 scientific articles, he’s especially known for his work on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or “ACT,” which is one of the most widely-used and researched new methods of psychological intervention in the last 20 years. Hayes has received several national awards, such as the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. His popular book “Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life” for a time was the best-selling self-help book in the United States, and his new book “A Liberated Mind” has been recently released to wide acclaim. His TEDx talks have been viewed by over 600,000 people, and he’s ranked among the most cited psychologists in the world. About the Inside Mental Health Podcast Host Gabe Howard lives with bipolar disorder and is a nationally recognized speaker and podcast host. He is the author of the book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
30 min
Therapy Chat
Therapy Chat
Laura Reagan, LCSW-C
266: Energy And Psychospiritual Work In Psychotherapy with Dr. Andy Hahn
Welcome back to Therapy Chat! In episode 266, host Laura Reagan, LCSW-C welcomes back Dr. Andy Hahn for part 2 about his Life Centered Therapy method and training process. About our guest: Andrew Hahn, Psy.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist. He received his A.B. Magna Cum Laude in Social Studies/Psychology from Harvard University and his Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Hahnemann University. He is certified by Helen Palmer to teach the Enneagram and has also been a faculty member in the graduate Counselling Programs at Lesley University and Northeastern University. While Dr. Hahn’s strong foundation and significant experience in traditional psychology has served his clients well, he has been untiring in his effort to understand what is going on for people so that he can better help them live more contented and healthier lives. This calling for greater understanding, as well as certain experiences which he could not fully comprehend within the confines of traditional Western paradigms, led him on a search for answers that opened him to the worlds of Buddhist and Eastern Psychology; Mystery Trainings; and Depth, Archetypal and Spiritual Psychology. Thich Nhat Hanh, Brugh Joy, Dick Olney, Helen Palmer, Barbara Hastings, and Claudio Naranjo were particularly influential teachers for him. His collaboration with Dr Judith Swack opened him to the world of kinesiology and energy psychology. Taking all of his prior experience and this collaboration led to the development of Life Centered Therapy and its training institute. Dr. Hahn has been using LCT for the past 25 years to successfully treat physical problems such as chronic pain, asthma, and allergies; emotional and mental problems such as depression, anxiety, PTSD, and much much more. In addition, a year-long training program has taught the approach to over a thousand students. Life Centered Therapy is a revolutionary healing framework that is a blueprint for transforming most problems, ranging from the most pedestrian to the most treatment resistant. And sometimes, the transformation simply takes one hour. The work provides people with an entirely new way of healing their suffering and helps them create miracles in their lives. Resources Interview Part 1 - https://bit.ly/3aV07ss Dr Andy Hahn's website: https://www.lifecenteredtherapy.com Thanks to everyone who registered for the Trauma Therapist Community clinical consultation groups! Groups are full and registration is now closed. If you'd like to be the first to know when I reopen TTC groups for new members (likely late summer 2021), Sign up at this link! Leave me a message via Speakpipe by going to https://therapychatpodcast.com and clicking on the green Speakpipe button. Thank you for listening to Therapy Chat! Please be sure to go to iTunes and leave a rating and review, subscribe and download episodes. You can also download the Therapy Chat app on iTunes by clicking here. Podcast produced by Pete Bailey - https://petebailey.net/audio
1 hr 1 min
The Trauma Therapist
The Trauma Therapist
Guy Macpherson, PhD
Episode 508: Rick Boone, PhD. Healing The Hearts of Warriors
Dr. Rick Boone is the Warriors Heart Clinical Director a licensed Psychologist, who currently leads the clinical team at the first and ONLY private and accredited residential treatment center in the U.S. exclusively for "warriors", which includes active-duty military, veterans, first responders and EMTs/Paramedics. His team helps our frontline protectors overcome drug and alcohol addiction, PTSD, mild TBI, trauma, anxiety, depression and other co-occurring issues. Earlier in his career, Dr. Boone served for nearly 9 years in the US Navy/Army, where he had two deployments as an Army combat operational stress psychologist to Iraq, and later to Afghanistan. In 2009, he was employed by the Department of Defense as a Social Scientist with the Human Terrain Teams in the Kandahar and Logar provinces of Afghanistan. Dr. Boone completed his Ph.D. in a program that specialized in the integration of psychological science and Judeo-Christian theology at Biola University in California. Dr. Boone was born and raised in Gallipolis, OH in the southeastern Ohio River Valley, is an avid reader, and has four children ranging in ages from 11 to 37. *In This Episode* * Dr. Boone’s Website ( https://www.warriorsheart.com/about-us/staff/#clinical-team ) * The Gifts of Imperfection ( https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0593133587/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?creative=9325&creativeASIN=0593133587&ie=UTF8&linkCode=as2&linkId=780bea4c869aab6c5f4fdc1e4b8beb41&tag=wescoatrapro-20 ) , Brene Brown Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-trauma-therapist-podcast-with-guy-macpherson-phd-inspiring-interviews-with-thought-leaders-in-the-field-of-trauma/donations Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brands
31 min
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT
Ep. 178: Ways to Break the Cycle of Perfectionism with Menije Boduryan
Welcome back to another episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast. Today we have on an amazing guest and therapist, Menije Boduryan. Menije is an OCD specialist as well as a specialist on perfectionism. She is here today to talk to us about perfectionism and to give us some tips on how to manage perfectionism in our own lives. Menije defines perfectionism as a drive to do things perfectly with anything less than 100% being unacceptable. It is a desire to want everything to be flawless and in that desire, comes a lot of expectations or rules that people set for themselves. She explains that perfectionism becomes a mindset and you begin to operate in the world expecting yourself to be perfect, as well as your partner, your best friend, your clothes, your work desk, what you eat, and how you exercise to all be perfect. It becomes powerful because our self-identity becomes so attached to this idea of being perfect. It is not just about the desire to do things perfectly, but it also becomes a belief that once you do things perfectly, then you are enough, you are worthy. Menije shares with us a bit about her own struggles with perfectionism and how perfectionism impacts our relationships. She describes how it is really possible to fall into a cycle with perfectionism. If you fall short in something you are doing, which you inevitably will, you start into the cycle of feeling shame and that you are not good enough so you then strive to work harder the next time to achieve that level of perfection. Menije shares with us one of the best ways to break out of that cycle of perfectionism is really to just give ourselves a tremendous amount of self-compassion. Recognizing that whatever happens today, I am worthy and I am enough. She also describes that breaking out of the cycle involves being able to tolerate your imperfections. Really being able to sit with the discomfort and anxiety that will come when you have done something that is not perfect. She describes it as very similar to exposure therapy. This interview is full of so many amazing insights. I hope you will find it as helpful and as meaningful as I did. Menije's Instagram @dr.menije If you get a moment, please go over to wherever you listen to podcasts, whether that be Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, Podbean, and leave an honest review. Tell me how you feel about it, whether it's helping you, what you'd like to see. We are going to give away a pair of Beats headphones of your choice of color once we hit a thousand reviews! ERP School, BFRB School and Mindfulness School for OCD are open for purchase. Click here for more information. Coming in March ERP School will be available with bonus material! Additional exciting news! ERP School is now CEU approved which means that it is an accredited course for therapists and mental health professionals to take towards their continuing education credit hours. Please click here for more information.
35 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
230: Secrets of Self-Esteem—What is it? How do I get it? How can I get rid of it once I’ve got it? And more, on Ask David!
* Ask David: Questions on self-esteem, recovery from PTSD, dating people with Borderline Personality Disorder, recovery on your own, and more! Jay asks: * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” * Many patients can read your books and do the exercises and recover on their own. Is a teacher or coach sometimes needed to speed things up? * Is it possible for a person to become happy WITHOUT needing anyone else if they have had depression in past and/or PTSD? * Also, how would Team-CBT address treating PTSD? PTSD can involve a person having multiple traumas. * * * * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? Thanks, Jay, I will make this an Ask david, if that is okay, but here is my quick response. Although many folks now show dramatic changes in a single, two-hour therapy session, they will still have to do homework to cement those gains, including: * Listening to or watching the recording of the session * Finish on paper any Daily Mood Log that was done primarily in role-playing during the session. In other words, write the Positive thoughts, rate the belief, and re-rate the belief in the corresponding negative thought. * Use the Daily Mood Log in the future whenever you get upset and start to have negative thoughts again. * I also do Relapse Prevention Training following the initial dramatic recovery, and this takes about 30 minutes. I advise the patient that relapse, which I define as one minute or more of feeling crappy, is 100% certain, and that no human being can be happy all the time. We all hit bumps in the road from time to time. When they do relapse, their original negative thoughts will return, and they will need to use the same technique again that worked for them the first time they recovered. In addition, they will have certain predictable thoughts when they relapse, like “this proves that the therapy didn’t rally work,” or “this shows that I really am a hopeless case,” or worthless, etc. I have them record a role-play challenging these thoughts with the Externalization of Voices, and do not discharge them until they can knock all these thoughts out of the park. I tell them to save the recording, and play it if they need it when they relapse. I also tell them that if they can’t handle the relapse, I’ll be glad to give them a tune up any time they need it. I rarely hear from them again, which is sad, actually, since I have developed a fondness for nearly all the patients I’ve ever treated. But I’d rather lose them quickly to recovery, than work with them endlessly because they’re not making progress! People with Relationship Problems recover more slowly than individuals with depression or anxiety for at least three reasons, and can rarely or never be treated effectively in a single two-hour session: * The outcome and process resistance to change in people with troubled relationships is typically way more intense. * It takes tremendous commitment and practice to get good at the five secrets of effective communication, in the same way that learning to play piano beautifully takes much commitment and practice. * Resolving relationship conflicts usually requires the death of the “self” or “ego,” and that can be painful. That’s why the Disarming Technique can be so hard for most people to learn, and many don’t even want to learn it, thinking that self-defense and arguing and fighting back is the best road to travel! * * * * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? Yes, Ten Days to Self-Esteem would likely be a deeper dive into the topic of Self-Esteem. It is a ten-step program that can be used in groups or individually in therapy, or as a self-help tool. There is a Leader’s Manual, too, for those who want to develop groups based on it. * * * * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” I was involved with a woman with Borderline Personality Disorder, and it was exhausting! Why was I attracted to her? Thank you for the question, Jay. Most claims about parents and childhood experiences, in my opinion, are just something somebody claimed and highly unlikely to be true if one had a really great data base to test the theory. We don’t really know why people are attracted to each other. Many men do seem attracted to women with Borderline Personality Disorder. Perhaps it’s exciting and dramatic dynamic that they’re attracted to, and perhaps it’s appealing to try to “help” someone who seems wounded. Good research on topics like this would be enormously challenging, and people would just ignore the results if not in line with their own thinking. Our field is not yet very scientific, but is dominated by “cults” and people who believe, and who desperately want to believe, things that are highly unlikely, in my opinion, to be true. I do quite a lot of data analysis using a sophisticated statistical modeling program called AMOS (the Analysis of Moment Structures) created by Dr. James Arbuckle from Temple University in Philadelphia, someone I admire tremendously. This program does something called structural equation modeling. In the typical analysis, the program tells you that your theory cannot possibly be true, based on your data. If you are brave, this can lead to radical changes in how you think and see things, especially if you are not “stuck” in your favored theories. But this type of analysis is not for the faint of heart. All the best, David Here is Jay’s follow-up email: HI Dr. Burns, As you know A LOT of people attribute their present problems (depression / anxiety / relationship conflicts / addictions) to their "abusive" or "toxic" relationship with their parents. It is interesting that it seems some people internalize negative beliefs about themselves based on what their parents said to them on a consistent basis. But it seems you are saying the data does not support that theory. Jay Thanks, Jay, I’m glad you responded again. There may be some truth to those kinds of theories. We know, for example, that abused or feral cats often have trouble with trust. So, we don’t want to trivialize the pain and the horrors that many humans and animals alike endure. At the same time, people are eager to jump onto theories that “sound right” to them and serve their purposes, and most of these theories are not based on sound research. Here are two examples from my own research. I tested, in part, the theory that depression comes from bad relationships, and also that addictions result from emotional problems. I examined the causal relationships between depression on the one hand and troubled vs happy relationships with loved ones on the other hand in several hundred patients during the first 12 weeks of treatment at my clinical in Philadelphia, and published it in top psychology journal for clinical research. (will include link) That was because there were at the time two warring camps—those who said that a lack of loving and satisfying relationships causes depression, and those who said it was the other way around, that depression leads to troubled relationships. And the third group said it worked both ways. My study indicated that although troubled relationships were correlated with depression, there were NO causal links in either direction. Instead, the statistical models strongly hinted that an unobs…
47 min
Understand Suicide
Understand Suicide
Paula Fontenelle
Ep. 59 - It's ok that you're not ok | Megan Devine
Every time someone asks me to suggest a grief book, I add Megan Devine’s bestselling book “It's ok that you’re not ok: meeting grief and loss in a culture that doesn’t understand” to the top of the list. It is a beautifully written testimonial of the messy, unpredictable, often judged process of grief. Megan is a psychotherapist, writer, and grief advocate. Her work has been featured widely in the media, including the New York Times, The Atlantic, Washington Post, GQ, Harvard Business Review, and NPR’s Marketplace. Her latest collaborative project, Speaking Grief, debuted in 2020, from PBS. In this interview, she talks about how difficult it is for all of us to know how to help someone in grief. Not only that, but also how to examine our own views on loss. Here are some tips from our conversation: - Practice listening to the pain. People don’t need to be corrected. They need to be heard. - What we do out of our own discomfort. Avoid platitudes. - It’s ok to lead with your awkwardness. We want to name it rather than manage the awkwardness. My favorite: “We can actually change the world just by being kinder and by listening, and not trying to solve somebody else’s pain for them. And by watching for those places where we feel catty about other people’s losses because what that really is is a message to ourselves that we don’t feel supported enough in our own lives and that’s valid.” Find Megan Devine: Book “It's ok that you’re not ok: meeting grief and loss in a culture that doesn’t understand” - https://refugeingrief.com/book/ - PBS documentary “Speaking Grief:” https://speakinggrief.org/ - Webpage: https://refugeingrief.com/ You can watch this interview on my YouTube Channel "Understand Suicide:" https://bit.ly/2NKwIsa Donate to the podcast: https://bit.ly/3maL9RO Visit my page www.understandsuicide.com Find my book "Understanding suicide: living with loss, paths to prevention" https://amzn.to/2ANczuR Contact me and exchange experiences on my Facebook page: https://bit.ly/3h8sIet --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paula-fontenelle/message
58 min
Very Bad Therapy
Very Bad Therapy
Ben Fineman and Caroline Wiita
76. VBT in Focus: Potentially Harmful Therapies (with Dr. Alex Williams and Dr. John Sakaluk)
The more you learn about psychotherapy research, the less it all seems to make sense. Dr. Alex Williams and Dr. John Sakaluk are working to change that by researching the research itself. We discuss two of their latest papers on empirically supported treatments and potentially harmful therapies. Which modalities can we be confident about? Which psychological interventions appear to cause harm? What do we know about EMDR and exposure therapy? VBT in Focus is a series of sporadic episodes in which Carrie and Ben have the privilege of chatting with their favorite thinkers in the field of psychotherapy. Thank you for listening. To support the show and receive access to regular bonus episodes, check out the Very Bad Therapy Patreon community. Introduction: 0:00 – 11:20 Part One: 11:20 – 1:58:23 Part Two: 1:58:20 – 2:00:02 Very Bad Therapy: Website / Facebook / Bookshelf / Tell Us Your Story Ben Fineman Counseling – Therapy for Young Professionals (Benjamin Michael Fineman - Registered Associate MFT #119754 - Supervised by Curt Widhalm, LMFT #47333) Show Notes: * APA Division 12 List of Empirically Supported Treatments * The evidence for evidence-based therapy is not as clear as we thought * Evaluating the evidential value of empirically supported psychological treatments (ESTs): A meta-scientific review * Potentially harmful therapies: A meta-scientific review of evidential value * Dr. Alex Williams: Twitter / Email: alexwilliams@ku.edu * Dr. John Sakaluk: Twitter * The Most Ridiculous Guy From John Mulaney’s Latest Stand-Up Special Is 100% Real And 100% Weird * Scared Straight: Bullying with Betty White – SNL
2 hr
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