Prisão Preventiva e Abusos Judiciários: Lava Jato, Crivella, Oswaldo: com Augusto de Arruda Botelho - Aprofundando #3
Play • 56 min
Listen now | No terceiro episódio do podcast Aprofundando, Glenn Greenwald e Victor Pougy conversam com o advogado criminalista Augusto de Arruda Botelho sobre prisão preventiva e como a operação Lava-Jato utilizou essa instituição de forma abusiva, e outras questões referentes às garantias constitucionais.

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EFF's How to Fix the Internet
EFF's How to Fix the Internet
Electronic Frontier Foundation
You Bought It, But Do You Own It? | 006
Chris Lewis joins EFF hosts Cindy Cohn and Danny O’Brien as they discuss how our access to knowledge is increasingly governed by "click-wrap" agreements that prevent users from ever owning things like books and music, and how this undermines the legal doctrine of “first sale” – which states that once you buy a copyrighted work, it’s yours to resell or give it away as you choose. They talk through the ramifications of this shift on society, and also start to paint a brighter future for how the digital world would thrive if we safeguard digital first sale. In this episode you’ll learn about: * The legal doctrine of first sale—in which owners of a copyrighted work can resell it or give it away as they choose—and why copyright maximalists have fought it for so long; * The Redigi case, in which a federal court held that the Redigi music service, which allows music fans to store and resell music they buy from iTunes, violated copyright law—and why that set us down the wrong path; * The need for a movement that can help champion digital first sale and access to knowledge more generally; * How digital first sale connects to issues of access to knowledge, and how this provides a nexus to issues of societal equity; * Why the shift to using terms of service to govern access to content such as music and books has meant that our access to knowledge is intermediated by contract law, which is often impenetrable to average users; * How not having a strong right of digital first sale undermines libraries, which have long benefited from bequests and donations; * How getting first sale right in the digital world will help to promote equitable access to knowledge and create a more accessible digital world. Christopher Lewis is President and CEO at Public Knowledge. Prior to being elevated to President and CEO, Chris served for as PK's Vice President from 2012 to 2019 where he led the organization's day-to-day advocacy and political strategy on Capitol Hill and at government agencies. During that time he also served as a local elected official, serving two terms on the Alexandria City Public School Board. Chris serves on the Board of Directors for the Institute for Local Self Reliance and represents Public Knowledge on the Board of the Broadband Internet Technical Advisory Group (BITAG). Before joining Public Knowledge, Chris worked in the Federal Communications Commission Office of Legislative Affairs, including as its Deputy Director. He is a former U.S. Senate staffer for the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and has over 18 years of political organizing and advocacy experience, including serving as Virginia State Director at GenerationEngage, and working as the North Carolina Field Director for Barack Obama's 2008 Presidential Campaign and other roles throughout the campaign. Chris graduated from Harvard University with a Bachelors degree in Government and lives in Alexandria, VA where he continues to volunteer and advocate on local civic issues. You can find Chris on Twitter at @ChrisJ_Lewis Please subscribe to How to Fix the Internet via RSS, Stitcher, TuneIn, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or your podcast player of choice. You can also find the Mp3 of this episode on the Internet Archive. If you have any feedback on this episode, please email podcast@eff.org. You’ll find legal resources – including links to important cases, books, and briefs discussed in the podcast – as well a full transcript of the audio at https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2020/12/podcast-episode-you-bought-it-do-you-own-it. Audio editing for this episode by Stuga Studios: https://www.stugastudios.com. Music by Nat Keefe: https://natkeefe.com/ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
59 min
The Expat Files: Living in Latin America
The Expat Files: Living in Latin America
Progressive Radio Network
EXPAT FILES - 02.26.21
Descriptions- EXPAT FILES SHOW #1034 FRI, FEB 26 (02-26-21) JOHNNY’S JANUARY 2021 LATIN AMERICAN “EXPAT INSIDER” SEMINAR HAS BEEN POSTPONED DUE TO BAD SCIENCE AND US GOVT STUPIDITY: The latest Latin American Seminar was scheduled for January 8th thru 14th, 2021. However, just when things were calming down, the “usual suspect’ Cov-Idiot knuckleheads in government along with talking head scientists (in the pocket of big pharma) have once again decided to arbitrarily place heavier restrictions on airports and arbitrarily imposing new lockdown restrictions (i.e. Soviet style house arrests). The excuse this time being an imminent so-called 2nd wave. Stay tuned for the new rescheduled dates- (estimated to be in March or April) when US and Latin America airports start accepting the cheap (1 to 3 dollar) rapid 5 minute paper strip Cov-idiot tests now used and widely accepted in Asia and Europe and projected to be used internationally in March or April . #1- Common law marriage traps in Latin America: Critical details that single gringos and expats need to know #2- The extreme indebtedness of Latin Families: How 90% of Latinos end up with zero savings and heavy debt #3- How Gringos embarrass themselves in the presence of Latinos: #4- Revisiting Costa Rica (and it ain’t good): If living in C.R. still is your plan, you need to hear this. #5- Crimes, Misdemeanors and the sticky fingers of the hired help: Can petty crimes be forgiven? How much is too much? #6 Latin American Cov-Idiot Update: #7- Johnny’s top five words of wisdom for Newbee Expats A realistic look beyond the rose colored glasses. #8- And now a few words from the Gringo Complaint Department: #9- A Cost of Living and Inflation update for Latin America: Get ready, inflation is kicking in. #10- Get a 100% legal (and well respected) 2nd Country Passport online and in just 60 days! The Corona virus has killed Latin American and Caribbean Island tourism so tax revenues have dried up. Governments are broke and a small few have reacted by offering passport by investment programs. I have personally vetted the best legit one. Amazingly, you can apply online without wasting time or repeatedly flying back and forth to the country. That’s a first! For details email; f and listen to the complete explanation outlined in “The Expat Files” show program aired on June 28, 2020. #11- Do you want to get into the exploding Crypto-currency world but don’t feeling quite confident enough to dive in? Our own Captain Mango has developed a unique one-on-one Crypto consulting and training service (he’s been deep into crypto since 2013). To get started, email him at: bewarecaptainmango@gmail.com #12- Be sure to pick up my newly updated, "LATIN AMERICAN HEALTHCARE REPORT": The new edition for 2021 (and beyond) is available now, including the latest "Stem Cell Clinic" info and data and my top picks for the best treatment centers for expats and gringos. Just go to www.ExpatPlanB.com and click on the "Latin American Healthcare Report”.
28 min
The Intrazone by Microsoft
The Intrazone by Microsoft
Microsoft
Drag and drop: Outlook to SharePoint
Drag and drop emails and attachments from Outlook into SharePoint, without leaving Outlook. We talk with Microsoft partner harmon.ie, along with their customer, Bosch. We'll highlight their solution for how emails and attachments are now saved to SharePoint - readily available for future audits and e-discovery. The combined SharePoint plus harmon.ie solution helps Bosch manage millions of daily emails, including active business records that need to be accessed, shared, and worked on by numerous colleagues. Click here for this episode's corresponding blog post. SharePoint | @SharePoint | SharePoint Community Blog | UserVoice David Lavenda | LinkedIn | Twitter | harmon.ie (Twitter) [guest] Daniel Stuch | LinkedIn | Bosch (Twitter) [guest] Mark Kashman | Twitter [co-host] Chris McNulty | Twitter [co-host] Events: Microsoft Ignite (Mar.2-4.2021) Collab365 GlobalCon5 (Mar.16-17.2021) | Twitter Reimagine Project Management with Microsoft (Mar.18.2021) SharePoint’s 20th Birthday Party (Mar.27.2021) The AIIM Conference (Apr.27-29.2021) SharePoint Fest Virtual Workshops (ongoing) CollabDays events (ongoing) SharePoint Saturdays events (ongoing) Resources: Microsoft 365 Content Services Partner Program Microsoft Partner Network Microsoft Viva https://aka.ms/Viva SharePoint Syntex https://aka.ms/SharePointSyntex Content Services https://aka.ms/sharepoint-contentservices Microsoft Docs - The home for Microsoft documentation for end users, developers, and IT professionals. Stay on top of Office 365 changes Subscribe to The Intrazone at aka.ms/TheIntrazone Listen and subscribe to other Microsoft podcasts at aka.ms/microsoft/podcasts
50 min
Tech's Message: News, Insight & Nostalgia With Nate Lanxon & Friends
Tech's Message: News, Insight & Nostalgia With Nate Lanxon & Friends
Nate Lanxon
Tech’s Message Episode 231: Short Version
This week on the regular version of Tech’s Message: Romance fraud on rise in coronavirus lockdown https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-55997611 Man to pay £25,000 damages over negative TrustPilot review https://on.ft.com/3aVEiI4 ** Exclusive for Patreon supporters ** Access to our ad-free, longer version of the show, which includes the above as well as additional discussions about: Twitter wants to let you pay me for my Tweets https://www.t3.com/news/twitter-wants-to-introduce-twipping Also each episode for Patreon supporters: Extended segments Personal stories Fun outtakes and so much more! TECH’S MESSAGE IS: Hosts: Nate Lanxon, Ian Morris Recurring Guest Host: Andy Hoyle Production and Editing: Nate Lanxon Voiceover Artist: Marta Svetek Music: Audio Network & Pond5 Certain Artwork Elements Designed By: macrovector / Freepik Publisher: Acast Copyright © Nate Lanxon Ads are not endorsements, nor controlled by Tech’s Message. Read Nate’s ad policy. Visit Us: UKTechShow.com WANT MORE? Access ad-free, extended versions of each episode, download our weekly sister show Extra Message, listen to us recording live or download a full uncensored copy on demand, and much more, by joining us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/uktech. You’ll get instant access to our entire back catalogue of extended shows, Extra Message, our Discord member’s club, higher quality MP3s, and there’s zero commitment required. Give us a try and support me and the show in the process!   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27 min
The History of Computing
The History of Computing
Charles Edge
Apple 1997-2011: The Return Of Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs left Apple in 1985. He co-founded NeXT Computers and took Pixar public. He then returned to Apple as the interim CEO in 1997 at a salary of $1 per year. Some of the early accomplishments on his watch were started before he got there. But turning the company back around was squarely on him and his team. By the end of 1997, Apple moved to a build-to-order manufacturing powered by an online store built on WebObjects, the NeXT application server. They killed off a number of models, simplifying the lineup of products and also killed the clone deals, ending licensing of the operating system to other vendors who were at times building sub-par products. And they were busy. You could feel the frenetic pace. They were busy at work weaving the raw components from NeXT into an operating system that would be called Mac OS X. They announced a partnership that would see Microsoft invest $150 million into Apple to settle patent disputes but that Microsoft would get Internet Explorer bundled on the Mac and give a commitment to release Office for the Mac again. By then, Apple had $1.2 billion in cash reserves again, but armed with a streamlined company that was ready to move forward - but 1998 was a bottoming out of sorts, with Apple only doing just shy of $6 billion in revenue. To move forward, they took a little lesson from the past and released a new all-in-one computer. One that put the color back into that Apple logo. Or rather removed all the colors but Aqua blue from it. The return of Steve Jobs invigorated many, such as Johnny Ive who is reported to have had a resignation in his back pocket when he met Jobs. Their collaboration led to a number of innovations, with a furious pace starting with the iMac. The first iMacs were shaped like gumdrops and the color of candy as well. The original Bondi blue had commercials showing all the cords in a typical PC setup and then the new iMac, “as unPC as you can get.” The iMac was supposed to be to get on the Internet. But the ensuing upgrades allowed for far more than that. The iMac put style back into Apple and even computers. Subsequent releases came in candy colors like Lime, Strawberry, Blueberry, Grape, Tangerine, and later on Blue Dalmatian and Flower Power. The G3 chipset bled out into other more professional products like a blue and white G3 tower, which featured a slightly faster processor than the beige tower G3, but a much cooler look - and very easy to get into compared to any other machine on the market at the time. And the Clamshell laptops used the same design language. Playful, colorful, but mostly as fast as their traditional PowerBook counterparts. But the team had their eye on a new strategy entirely. Yes, people wanted to get online - but these computers could do so much more. Apple wanted to make the Mac the Digital Hub for content. This centered around a technology that had been codeveloped from Apple, Sony, Panasonic, and others called IEEE 1394. But that was kinda’ boring so we just called it Firewire. Begun in 1986 and originally started by Apple, Firewire had become a port that was on most digital cameras at the time. USB wasn’t fast enough to load and unload a lot of newer content like audio and video from cameras to computers. But I can clearly remember that by the year 1999 we were all living as Jobs put it in a “new emerging digital lifestyle.” This led to a number of releases from Apple. One was iMovie. Apple included it with the new iMac DV model for free. That model dumped the fan (which Jobs never liked even going back to the early days of Apple) as well as FireWire and the ability to add an AirPort card. Oh, and they released an AirPort base station in 1999 to help people get online easily. It is still one of the simplest router and wi-fi devices I’ve ever used. And was sleek with the new Graphite design language that would take Apple through for years on their professional devices. iMovie was a single place to load all those digital videos and turn them into something else. And there was another format on the rise, MP3. Most everyone I’ve ever known at Apple love music. It’s in the DNA of the company, going back to Wozniak and Jobs and their love of musicians like Bob Dylan in the 1970s. The rise of the transistor radio and then the cassette and Walkman had opened our eyes to the democratization of what we could listen to as humans. But the MP3 format, which had been around since 1993, was on the rise. People were ripping and trading songs and Apple looked at a tool called Audion and another called SoundJam and decided that rather than Sherlock (or build that into the OS) that they would buy SoundJam in 2000. The new software, which they called iTunes, allowed users to rip and burn CDs easily. Apple then added iPhoto, iWeb, and iDVD. For photos, creating web sites, and making DVDs respectively. The digital hub was coming together. But there was another very important part of that whole digital hub strategy. Now that we had music on our computers we needed something more portable to listen to that music on. There were MP3 players like the Diamond Rio out there, and there had been going back to the waning days of the Digital Equipment Research Lab - but they were either clunky or had poor design or just crappy and cheap. And mostly only held an album or two. I remember walking down that isle at Fry’s about once every other month waiting and hoping. But nothing good ever came. That is, until Jobs and the Apple hardware engineering lead Job Rubinstein found Tony Fadell. He had been at General Magic, you know, the company that ushered in mobility as an industry. And he’d built Windows CE mobile devices for Philips in the Velo and Nino. But when we got him working with Jobs, Rubinstein, and Johnny Ive on the industrial design front, we got one of the most iconic devices ever made: the iPod. And the iPod wasn’t all that different on the inside from a Newton. Blasphemy I know. It sported a pair of ARM chips and Ive harkened back to simpler times when he based the design on a transistor radio. Attention to detail and the lack thereof in the Sony Diskman propelled Apple to sell more than 400 million iPods to this day. By the time the iPod was released in 2001, Apple revenues had jumped to just shy of $8 billion but dropped back down to $5.3. But everything was about to change. And part of that was that the iPod design language was about to leak out to the rest of the products with white iBooks, white Mac Minis, and other white devices as a design language of sorts. To sell all those iDevices, Apple embarked on a strategy that seemed crazy at the time. They opened retail stores. They hired Ron Johnson and opened two stores in 2001. They would grow to over 500 stores, and hit a billion in sales within three years. Johnson had been the VP of merchandising at Target and with the teams at Apple came up with the idea of taking payment without cash registers (after all you have an internet connected device you want to sell people) and the Genius Bar. And generations of devices came that led people back into the stores. The G4 came along - as did faster RAM. And while Apple was updating the classic Mac operating system, they were also hard at work preparing NeXT to go across the full line of computers. They had been working the bugs out in Rhapsody and then Mac OS X Server, but the client OS, Codenamed Kodiak, went into beta in 2000 and then was released as a dual-boot option in Cheetah, in 2001. And thus began a long line of big cats, going to Puma then Jaguar in 2002, Panther in 2003, Tiger in 2005, Leopard in 2007, Snow Leopard in 2009, Lion in 2011, Mountain Lion in 2012 before moving to the new naming scheme that uses famous places in California. Mac OS X finally provided a ground-up, modern, object-oriented operating system. They built the Aqua interface on top of it. Beautiful, modern, sleek. Even the backgrounds! The iMac would go from a gumdro…
26 min
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