Behavior Bitches
Behavior Bitches
Jun 8, 2020
F#%k Debt
Play • 42 min

Episode 53: Today’s episode will get you hot and bothered. Maybe just bothered because every time most of us hear the world student loans or credit card debt we puke in our mouths and then reluctantly swallow it #amIright. The thing is we won’t just get you bothered on this episode, we will put some fire under your ass (hence the hot part) and get you pumpedAF to feel the relief of becoming debt free! Casey and I have taken this on ourselves this year and are working toward becoming debt free and fabulous and let me tell you, we’re on FIRE! Ya sure, Losing weight is great, but have you ever lost debt?  That’s some real shit. Tune in or miss the F#%k out.

Show notes:

https://www.daveramsey.com/blog/how-the-debt-snowball-method-works

Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health
Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health
Mad in America
Trailer - Online Town Hall - Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal
Mad in America, in partnership with the Council for Evidence Based Psychiatry and the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug withdrawal is arranging a series of free to attend online town hall discussions on psychiatric drug withdrawal. We aim to explore what we do and don’t know about safe withdrawal from antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and stimulants. We will discuss the knowledge, skills and experience necessary to support those who may be having difficulty getting off psychiatric drugs. By doing this we hope to stimulate further discussion between service users and prescribers. Our first discussion will be held on Friday January 15th at 10 AM Pacific time, 1 PM Eastern time and 6 PM GMT. The panellists for the first discussion are Adele Framer, founder of Surviving Antidepressants; Swapnil Gupta, a Board Member of the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal and a psychiatrist with a special interest in deprescribing; John Read, Professor of Psychology and Chair of the International Institute for Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal; and Luke Montagu, co-founder of the Council for Evidence-based Psychiatry and member of the NICE guideline committee for safe prescribing and withdrawal. To register for the first discussion, visit madinamerica.com and use the link at the bottom of the home page or click here: https://bit.ly/psych-drug-withdrawal We hope that these discussions will add to an increasingly detailed collection of knowledge and experiences that can inform prescribers when providing informed consent and when implementing gradual tapering regimes. We very much hope you can join us.
2 min
ABA Inside Track
ABA Inside Track
Robert Parry-Cruwys
Episode 152 - (ETHICS) Ethics of Teaching Cultural Responsiveness
While we weren’t able to record our live talk at the Thompson Center Conference this year, it did give us time to think about the ethical responsibility of BCBAs to include instruction and support in improving the cultural responsiveness of our supervisees. I mean, how else can we expect the next generations of behavior analysts to improve their ability to take culture into account during assessment, treatment, and rapport building activities? Note: This episode is worth 1.5 Learning Credits Articles discussed this episode: Sellers, T. P., Alai-Rosales, S., MacDonald, R. P. F. (2016). Taking full responsibility: The ethics of supervision in behavior analytic practice. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 299-308. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0144-x Munoz, C. C., DoBroka, C. C., & Mohammad, S. (2009). Development of a multidisciplinary course in cultural competence for nursing and human service professions. Journal of Nursing Education, 48, 495-503. doi: 10.3928/01484834-20090610-03 Rogers-Sirin, L., & Sirin, S. R. (2009). Cultural competence as an ethical requirement: Introducing a new educational model. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 2, 19-29. doi: 10.1037/a0013762 If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.
1 hr 28 min
OCD RECOVERY
OCD RECOVERY
Ali Greymond
What Counts As OCD Rumination?
OCD HELP App: https://apps.apple.com/app/ocd-help/id1320556362 Private OCD Recovery Program With Ali Greymond - YOUHAVEOCD.COM “The OCD Recovery Program has a high recovery rate because of action based approach sessions and text support between sessions. This keeps the person moving forward every day in OCD recovery. Ali Greymond guides you through the difficult moments and pushes you to fight for recovery. You are never going to feel alone in your daily battle against OCD and as long as you follow the program, you will recover.” OCD Recovery Program Testimonials I would just like to say a massive thank you to Ali Greymond for all of her help and support through what had to be one of the hardest and most fearful times in my life. Hell sounded appealing to what I was living with- false memory OCD! I’m very private and the thought of telling someone my intrusive thoughts was agonizing. I listened to Ali’s shows on YouTube and I knew the best person to help me was her, Ali made me feel so comfortable, I never once felt as though she was judging me in anyway in fact she made me feel the opposite like I was normal and none of this meant anything. She gave me the tools and skyped me every day I felt like She was in the next room the support was amazing. This wonderful lady changed my life, it’s hard work and determination daily but if there’s one person that can help you recover from OCD it’s Ali Greymond. She’s amazing at what she does and me and my family are blessed we found her because I don’t know where I’d be now. Thank you Ali your programme is amazing. (L.) I came to Ali with a severe case of contamination OCD. Ali graciously offered me an introductory session free of charge. When I asked her when we could start, she said “how about today”? I liked that she was that proactive and willing to jump in immediately. I looked at the packages she offered and signed up immediately for the “Severe OCD” package, because that accurately described the state I was in. Ali almost immediately became my anchor, my support system and friend through this very frightening and lonely disorder. With Ali by my side, I had hope for the first time and I made strides that even surprised me. I was amazed at how quickly I started to recover. It felt like magic to me. Having been a fellow sufferer herself, she truly understands the disorder. I felt that Ali intuitively knew when to push me through a fear and when to back off. When she felt that I was not ready for an exercise she told me. When she felt that I could push through a fear, she told me and 100% of the time, she was on point! This was extremely important as feeling in control is such a huge element of this disorder. I would recommend anyone suffering with this disorder to work with Ali. She helped me get my life back and that is priceless. (J.) Private OCD Recovery Program with Ali Greymond - youhaveocd.com
10 min
PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd
PsychEd Episode 30: Anti-black Racism and Mental Health with Dr. Kwame McKenzie
Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers anti-black racism and mental health with Dr. Kwame McKenzie. Dr. McKenzie is an international expert on the social causes of illness, suicide and the development of effective, equitable health systems. He is a Professor of Psychiatry at University of Toronto and a staff psychiatrist and Director of Health Equity at the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health. The learning objectives: By the end of this episode, you should be able to… * Understand the history and legacy of racism and mental health in the black community * Understand the current state of racism towards black people and the impacts on their mental health. * Explore how healthcare workers can be anti-racist in providing mental health care and how the system can change to improve the mental health of black people. Host(s): Anita Corsini (social worker), Dr. Alex Raben (staff psychiatrist), and Rebecca Marsh (CC4) Produced by: Anita Corsini, Rebecca Marsh, Randi Wang (CC4), and Dr. Alex Raben Guest experts: Dr. Kwame McKenzie, staff psychiatrist Resources: Manual for Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for English-Speaking People of Caribbean Origin The City of Toronto has curated a list of Mental Health Resources for Black Communities. Organizations include: * Across Boundaries * Black Creek Community Health Centre * Caribbean African Canadian Social Services * Rexdale Community Health Centre * TAIBU Community Health Centre * The Black Health Alliance * Women’s Health in Women’s Hands Community Health Centre References: * Adelman, J. (2003). Study in Blue and Grey, Police Interventions with People with Mental Illness: A Review of Challenges and Responses [Ebook]. Canadian Mental Health Association. Retrieved 7 October 2020, from https://cmha.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/policereport.pdf. * Bailey, R. K., Mokonogho, J., & Kumar, A. (2019). Racial and ethnic differences in depression: current perspectives. Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment, 15, 603–609. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S128584 * Bor, J., Venkataramani, A., Williams, D., & Tsai, A. (2018). Police killings and their spillover effects on the mental health of black Americans: a population-based, quasi-experimental study. The Lancet, 392(10144), 302-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(18)31130-9 * Bresnahan, M., Begg, M., Brown, A., Schaefer, C., Sohler, N., & Insel, B. et al. (2007). Race and risk of schizophrenia in a US birth cohort: another example of health disparity?. International Journal Of Epidemiology, 36(4), 751-758. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dym041 * Chakraborty, A., McKenzie, K., & King, M. (2009). Discrimination, ethnicity and psychosis — a qualitative study. Ethnicity And Inequalities In Health And Social Care, 2(1), 18-29. https://doi.org/10.1108/17570980200900004 * Fernando, S. (2014). Racism in psychiatry. In R. Moodley & M. Ocampo (Eds.), Critical Psychiatry and Mental Health: Exploring the Work of Suman Fernando in Clinical Practice (pp. 22-32). Taylor & Francis. * Kirkmayer, L. J. (2014). Critical psychiatry in Canada. In R. Moodley & M. Ocampo (Eds.), Critical Psychiatry and Mental Health: Exploring the Work of Suman Fernando in Clinical Practice (pp. 170-181). Taylor & Francis. * Kuper, A. (2018). Cultural Safety & Equity [Lecture PDF]. Retrieved from University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. * Maynard, R. (2017). Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present. Fernwood. * McKenzie, K. (2002). Does racial discrimination cause mental illness?. European Psychiatry, 17, 84. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0924-9338(02)80385-6 * McKenzie, K., & Bhui, K. (2007). Institutional racism in mental health care. BMJ, 334(7595), 649-650. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39163.395972.80 * MCRRT - St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. (2020). Retrieved 7 October 2020, from https://www.stjoes.ca/health-services/mental-health-addiction-services/mental-health-services/coast/mcrrt. * Richardson, L. (2019). Diversity and Advocacy [Lecture PDF]. Retrieved from University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association. For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast) and Facebook. You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information visit our website: psychedpodcast.org.
1 hr 5 min
Change Academy
Change Academy
Brock Armstrong & Monica Reinagel
Why We Say Yes
When we are trying to change an unwanted behavior, we often get so focused on trying to find ways to say no to it that we miss the step of understanding why we say yes to it in the first place. While learning how to say no is a valuable skill (and one we’ll look at in a future episode), understanding why we say yes can ultimately be more important and more effective than just getting better at saying no ourselves. Takeaways: There are times when simply getting better at saying no to yourself (or your inner toddler) is the perfect thing to practice. But when saying no becomes unsustainable and you find yourself rebelling more often than you are succeeding, it is time to take a closer look. The reasons we give ourselves for choosing an undesired behavior are often rooted in some cognitive distortions or at least wishful thinking. By identifying why we say yes to something that we should say no to (or vice versa) we can start to dismantle our faulty thinking and develop the skills to stay on track with ease. Lab Experiment: Think about the reasons why you say yes to a certain behavior. Make a list of: * What you think this behavior gives you or how it benefits you. * The reasons others (friends, media, society) give for why people indulge in (or abstain from) this behavior. * How you feel about others who exhibit this behavior. Reflect on how you feel about this behavior now that you understand it from more angles. And keep this list handy for the next time you feel like saying NO isn’t going to cut it.
25 min
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