Behavior Bitches
Behavior Bitches
Oct 19, 2020
Don’t Sush: Ethics with Dr. Darren Sush
1 hr 11 min

On today’s episode, we have Dr. Darren Sush on to talk about all things ethics! Darren is co-author of the book, “A workbook of Ethical Case Scenarios in Applied Behavior Analysis” so the dude knows his sh*t. We asked both personal ethical questions along with asking some of our listener’s questions. There isn’t a single ethics question that Darren shys away from. He also tells us how to choose the BEST answer when it comes to ethics questions in the exam. Tune in or miss the f#%k out!

Show notes:

https://www.amazon.com/Workbook-Ethical-Scenarios-Behavior-Analysis/dp/012815893X

Heme Review
Heme Review
Chubbyemu
The Body After Eating Several Pounds Licorice Candy
Based on N Engl J Med 2020; 383:1263-1275. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMcpc2002420 Video version of this podcast: https://youtu.be/8lGmvFkAMOU Chubbyemu video of this case: https://youtu.be/qg76qIZ4BQ8 Laxative Brownie video from 2017: https://youtu.be/TMy0vJfKvzI Tweet me: https://twitter.com/hemereview  IG me: https://instagram.com/hemereview  FB me: https://facebook.com/hemereview Licorice candy has glycyrrhizin which increases cortisol (stress hormone) levels in the body. This causes hypokalemia. Hypo- low. Kal- kalium (potassium). emia- presence in blood. Potassium signals muscle relaxation. Low potassium, low relaxation. Heart can't relax, then it stops.  Real licorice candy is not easy to get in the United States. It's not at big chain grocery stores. Most of what you can buy from the big brands is licorice flavored, and won't do this. References: A 54-Year-Old Man with Sudden Cardiac Arrest. N Engl J Med 2020; 383:1263-1275. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMcpc2002420 The Pharmacological Activities of Glycyrrhizinic Acid (“Glycyrrhizin”) and Glycyrrhetinic Acid. Sweeteners. 2018 : 245–261. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7123798/ Sustained Leukocyte Count during Rising Cortisol Level. Acta Haematologica 118(2):73-6. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6298458 https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/1964/bloch/lecture/ Licorice-Induced Hypermineralocorticoidism. N Engl J Med 1991; 325:1223-1227. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJM199110243251706 Young WF, et. al. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndromes (including chronic licorice ingestion). In: UpToDate, Post, TW (Ed), UpToDate, Waltham, MA, 2019. Quinkler M, Stewart PM. Hypertension and the cortisol-cortisone shuttle. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003; 88:2384. Funder JW. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2017; 165:151. Funder JW. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase: new answers, new questions. Eur J Endocrinol 1996; 134:267. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chubbyemu/support
21 min
Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health
Mad in America: Rethinking Mental Health
Mad in America
Jennifer White - Rethinking Suicide Prevention
Jennifer White is one of the founders of the Critical Suicidology Network, a growing international network of scholars interested in exploring alternatives to biomedical approaches to suicide prevention. Critical suicidology brings together persons with lived experience, mental health professionals, researchers, and activists “to rethink what it means to study suicide and enact practices of suicide prevention in more diverse and creative, less psycho-centric and less depoliticized, ways.” She is a Professor in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada. She has practiced as a counselor, educator, researcher, and advocate. White served for seven years as the Director of the Suicide Prevention Center in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia. She has written numerous articles and book chapters on suicide and self-harm and has co-authored two books: Child and youth care: Critical perspectives on pedagogy, practice and policy (2011), and Critical suicidology: Transforming suicide research and prevention for the 21st century (2016). Her current research focus centers itself around the contemporary discourse of youth suicide prevention, seeking alternatives to one-size-fits-all approaches. She is currently leading a Wise Practices for Life Promotion project funded by the First Nations and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) of Health Canada. This project seeks to curate a series of wise practices for promoting life based on what is already working and/or showing promise in First Nations communities across the country. She is also conducting a study with family counselors to learn more about the challenges and opportunities they face with youth suicide prevention and the organizational conditions that support them to be most effective in their work.
47 min
The Holistic Herbalism Podcast
The Holistic Herbalism Podcast
CommonWealth Center for Holistic Herbalism
A Case Study: Herbs and Nightmares
Dreaming matters: it’s a critical part of our identity-building and experience-processing work, and vital to our ability to regulate our emotions. But not all dreams are good. When nightmares happen, especially if they happen chronically, they can make dreaming itself feel unsafe. But never fear: when we need help we can always turn to herbs, and nightmares are no exception. In this episode we present a very personal case study about working with herbs and nightmares to improve one’s relationship with dreaming. This is katja’s story, and it’s a story involving trauma from assault, which led to nightmares for more than a decade. It was exacerbated by an abusive living situation – as Katja puts it, “like microdosing the original traumatic experience”. The work she engaged in, with the help of plants, was about building agency in dreams. This effort paralleled work she did in waking life, building healthier boundaries and developing her own empowerment. These efforts supported each other – each one helped the other proceed. Of course, nightmares and poor sleep are connected – nightmares lead to dread of sleep, poor sleep worsens nightmares. So the approach is to combine herbs for dream work – cultivating feelings of safety, lessening fear of dreaming & dread of sleep – together with a comprehensive sleep protocol, plus herbs that helping her build agency in her waking life. Herbs discussed include: mugwort, motherwort, ghost pipe, yarrow, blue vervain, ginger, chamomile, skullcap, passionflower, linden, hawthorn, tulsi, wood betony, rose, nettle, elecampane, st john’s wort, sage, elderflower, calamus. Interested in deepening your dreaming? Want to explore herbs who can help you dream more vividly, or achieve lucidity in your dreams? Our mini-course on Herbs and Dreaming is for you! Learn key herbs from across the world (and probably in your backyard!) with oneirogenic activity. As always, please *subscribe, rate, & review* our podcast wherever you listen, so others can find it more easily. Thank you!! Our theme music is “Wings” by Nicolai Heidlas. Support the show (https://commonwealthherbs.com/supporters/)
1 hr 20 min
The Plant Path
The Plant Path
with Sajah & Whitney Popham, founders of The School of Evolutionary Herbalism. Herbalist, Spagyricist, Medical Astrologer
How Herbalists Can Change With The Times
In this week's post, I want to talk about the state of the world right now how everything seems to be turning upside down. Everything is changing very rapidly in terms of the picture of human health and what's going on culturally and what's going on in nature. So how do we as herbalists change along with that? What are the things that we as herbalists can be doing to make sure that our practice of plant medicine is following the changes that are occurring? ———————————— CONNECT WITH SAJAH AND WHITNEY ———————————— To get free in depth mini-courses and videos, visit our blog at: http://www.evolutionaryherbalism.com Get daily inspiration and plant wisdom on our Facebook and Instagram channels: http://www.facebook.com/EvolutionaryHerbalism https://www.instagram.com/evolutionary_herbalism/ Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyP63opAmcpIAQg1M9ShNSQ ———————————— ABOUT SAJAH ———————————— Sajah Popham is the author of Evolutionary Herbalism and the founder of the School of Evolutionary Herbalism, where he trains herbalists in a holistic system of plant medicine that encompasses clinical western herbalism, medical astrology, Ayurveda, and spagyric alchemy. His mission is to develop a comprehensive approach that balances the science and spirituality of plant medicine, focusing on using plants to heal and rejuvenate the body, clarify the mind, open the heart, and support the development of the soul. Sajah’s approach honors and acknowledges the chemical, energetic, and spiritual properties of plants for a holistic model that uses the whole herb to heal the whole person. He lives on a homestead in the foothills of Mt. Baker Washington with his wife Whitney where he teaches, consults clients, and prepares spagyric herbal medicines. ———————————— ABOUT THE PLANT PATH ———————————— The Plant Path provides unique perspectives for the modern practitioner of herbalism that doesn’t just want to “fix what’s broken” in the body, but seeks to serve others with deeper levels of healing and transformation with herbal medicines. A unique synergy of clinical herbalism, alchemy, medical astrology, and herbal traditions from around the world, The Plant Path focuses on giving you a truly “wholistic” perspective on herbal medicine so you never fall into the trap of allopathic herbalism. ———————————— WANT TO FEATURE US ON YOUR PODCAST? ———————————— If you’d like to interview Sajah or Whitney to be on your podcast, click here to fill out an interview request form.
13 min
The Betty Rocker Show
The Betty Rocker Show
Bree Argetsinger - aka Coach Betty Rocker
Episode 22: Stress Less, Accomplish More with Ziva Meditation's Emily Fletcher
In today’s episode I’m joined by the amazing Emily Fletcher, the founder of Ziva Meditation and the leading expert in meditation for performance. The Ziva Technique is a powerful combination of mindfulness, meditation and manifesting designed to help you get better at life and reduce your stress. Stress is the root cause behind so many diseases and has such a far reaching impact on our lives, affecting everything from our happiness to our hormones. In today’s episode we take an in depth look at how stress impacts our physiology and cover simple tools we can all access anywhere we are to positivity influence the quality of our lives! Enjoy the episode, and get all the notes, resources and additional links at: https://thebettyrocker.com/episode-22-stress-less-accomplish-more-with-ziva-meditations-emily-fletcher/ Resources Mentioned in this Episode Ziva Meditation: https://zivameditation.com/ Stress Less, Accomplish More: https://zivameditation.com/slam/ Rock Your Life: https://shop.thebettyrocker.com/rock-your-life/ Top 5 Ways to Beat Stress and Get More From Your Workouts: https://thebettyrocker.com/top-5-ways-to-beat-stress-and-get-more-from-your-workouts/ Serenicalm: https://store.thebettyrocker.com/products/serenicalm COMPLETE SHOW NOTES AND LINKS PAGE: https://thebettyrocker.com/episode-22-stress-less-accomplish-more-with-ziva-meditations-emily-fletcher/
42 min
Buddha at the Gas Pump
Buddha at the Gas Pump
Rick Archer
577. Rick Hanson, 2nd Interview
This interview was recorded on October 9, 2020, as part of an online conference on "Living and Dying" offered by the Science and Nonduality Conference. The conference has finished, but you may sign up to access all of its content. Rick Hanson, Ph.D. is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center, and New York Times best-selling author. His free weekly newsletter has 180,000 subscribers and his online programs have scholarships available for those with financial needs. His books have been published in 29 languages with 900,000 copies in English alone and include: Neurodharma: New Science, Ancient Wisdom, and Seven Practices of the Highest Happiness Resilient: How to Grow an Unshakable Core of Calm, Strength, and Happiness Hardwiring Happiness: The New Brain Science of Contentment, Calm, and Confidence Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love, and Wisdom Just One Thing: Developing a Buddha Brain One Simple Practice at a Time Mother Nurture: A Mother's Guide to Health in Body, Mind, and Intimate Relationships He’s lectured at NASA, Google, Oxford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. An expert on positive neuroplasticity, his work has been featured on the BBC, CBS, NPR, and other major media. He began meditating in 1974 and is the founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom. He loves wilderness and taking a break from emails. Website: rickhanson.net Discussion of this interview in the BatGap Community Facebook Group. First BatGap interview with Rick Hanson. Video and audio below. Audio also available as a Podcast.
49 min
Aria Code
Aria Code
WQXR & The Metropolitan Opera
Rossini's La Cenerentola: Opera's Cinderella Story
Gioachino Rossini’s operatic version of the Cinderella story may not have any enchanted mice or pumpkins, but there’s plenty of magic in the music. Cinderella (or La Cenerentola, in Italian) has silently suffered the abuse of her stepfather and stepsisters, but in true fairy tale fashion, her fate changes for the better and all is made right by the triumph of goodness over evil. In the opera’s joyous finale “Nacqui all’affanno… Non più mesta,” Cenerentola looks ahead to a future with no more sadness. In this episode, Rhiannon Giddens and guests explore this universal tale and how it still resonates today. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato sings the aria onstage at the Metropolitan Opera. The Guests Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato loves the strength and sincerity of this great Rossini heroine. She has performed the title role in La Cenerentola at leading opera houses around the world and believes in its absolute celebration of human goodness. Writer Fred Plotkin loves opera – all of it! – and he shares this love in his book Opera 101: A Guide to Learning and Loving Opera. He has a special connection to Rossini’s music, which he feels is all about the heartbeat. Maria Tatar is a research professor at Harvard University in the fields of folkore and mythology. She vividly remembers when her sister used to read fairy tales to her as a child, and believes that we have the right and responsibility to keep retelling these stories in a way that’s meaningful to us today. Mezzo-soprano Alma Salcedo’s mother tells her she’s been singing since she was nine months old. Her personal Cinderella story began in Venezuela and has brought her to Spain, where she has fought to keep her dreams of being a singer alive.
41 min
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