Coffee and Books
Coffee and Books
Oct 19, 2020
Bettina Love Discusses "We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom"
49 min

On this episode of Coffee and Books, Marc talks with professor Bettina Love. The two discuss her book; We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom. Marc and Bettina discuss how comedy and fiction impact her nonfiction writing, what book changed everything for her, and why she identifies as a writer more than an author.

Intersectionality Matters!
Intersectionality Matters!
African American Policy Forum
30. Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?
After perhaps the most important election of our lifetimes, the real work begins. On this episode, Kimberlé sits down with a brilliant group of political thinkers and leaders to analyze the 2020 election and the challenges that remain. The discussion includes insights as to how local organizers turned Georgia blue for the first time in a generation, what strategies progressives might employ to keep pressure on President-elect Biden, and why in 2020, President Trump appears to have made electoral inroads with every demographic but white men. The panelists also discuss Kamala Harris’ historic ascension to the nation's second highest office, despite facing unparalleled levels of misogynoir. With: ALICIA GARZA - Co-Founder, Black Lives Matter; Principal, Black Futures Lab EDDIE GLAUDE JR. - Professor, Princeton; Author of Begin Again: James Baldwin's America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own JANINE JACKSON - Program Director, FAIR; Producer/Host of CounterSpin
 REP BARBARA LEE - U.S. Representative for California's 13th congressional district KATE MANNE - Professor, Cornell; Author of Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny VIET THANH NGUYEN - Professor, USC; Pulitzer Prize author, The Sympathizer KIRSTEN WEST SAVALI - Executive Producer, Essence Magazine EMERY WRIGHT - Co-director, Project South; Organizer and political educator Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks) Produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Rebecca Scheckman Additional support provided by the African American Policy Forum Music by Blue Dot Sessions Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast
1 hr 13 min
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check
5: It’s Time America Abolished Poverty
There are a lot of jobs we as a country don’t value. Think farm work, child care, service jobs—these low-wage, often racialized and gendered jobs form the backbone of our economy, but if you’ve worked in any of these fields, you know how hard it can be to make ends meet on these jobs. Three of Dorian Warren’s grandparents were janitors, another job that doesn’t get its due. But they were also proud members of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and through their work and their union they learned a vital lesson. If we want to improve working conditions for these undervalued jobs, you can either upgrade the workers, or you can upgrade the jobs—or you can do both. Upgrading and transforming jobs, especially dangerous and poverty-level jobs in growing sectors like care work (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/coronavirus-child-care-nurses-essential/) , is a critically important strategy precisely because of the historically devalued nature of this labor. But it takes power—the collective power of workers joining together with communities—to redesign the system of bad, poverty-level jobs into good jobs. On this week’s show, Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren follow up on last week’s episode (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/society/poverty-inequality-basic-income/) to answer the question: How can we eradicate poverty in America? It's not just about jobs, and the answers are common sense, but radical: To end poverty, we need to meet people’s real needs, like food, or diapers, or childcare, but we also need to disrupt and reform the systems that keep people in poverty, and we need to give people the power to smash through the structures holding them back. For insight on how to get to a poverty-free America, Melissa and Dorian turn to experts leading campaigns and organizations fighting against the system of poverty. Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/we-still-live-in-two-americas-not-one/) , co-director of the Kairos Center and national co-director of the Poor People’s Campaign, joins to discuss how abolishing poverty is a moral imperative—and it makes good policy sense as well, leading to stronger organizing possibilities for all working Americans. Next up, Mary Kay Henry (https://www.seiu.org/mary-kay-henry) , President of SEIU, joins to talk about the role of multi-racial worker power in disrupting the system of poverty. Henry talks to Melissa and Dorian in-depth about the innovative “Fight for $15 and a Union” campaign SEIU helped launched in 2012, and the transformative power of workers setting the terms of their own fights. We then check-in with—and give the final word to—two guests on the ground in North Carolina doing the work to fulfill the immediate needs of those living in poverty and struggling to make ends meet. We talk to Eric Aft, CEO of the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina (https://www.secondharvestnwnc.org/about-us) , who talks to us about “feeding the line and shortening the line” for the over 200,000 individuals his organization and its partners serve yearly. And Melissa and Dorian talk with Michelle Old, Executive Director of the North Carolina Diaper Bank, (https://ncdiaperbank.org/about-us) about how having access to diapers and what she calls “dignity items” is a vital necessity for babies, children and families to thrive. System Checklist  During the Covid-19 pandemic millions of Americans have fallen more deeply into poverty. Alleviating poverty in America requires political will, investment, and a strategy to win. During the past two weeks our System Check guests have identified two key issues that keep people poor: lack of cash and lack of power. This week’s System Checklist highlights a political agenda that addresses both. Raise the minimum wage. The last time Congress raised the federal minimum wage was 2007! We know that this meager $7.25 / hour minimum hasn't kept pace with cost of living. (https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/01/21/if-worker-pay-had-kept-pace-productivity-gains-1968-todays-minimum-wage-would-be-24) Right now there is nowhere in the country where a full time, minimum wage worker can afford rent on a two bedroom apartment. We must raise the minimum wage. Join the Fight for 15. (https://fightfor15.org) Universal Health Care. Unexpected medical bills cause 40% of individual bankruptcies. (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html) Universal health care acknowledges that healthcare is a basic, human right and unlinks health and wealth. With access to affordable, available health care, families can spend their income on housing, food, and other necessities, while avoiding the medical bill caused spiral into poverty. Join the majority of Americans (https://www.kff.org/slideshow/public-opinion-on-single-payer-national-health-plans-and-expanding-access-to-medicare-coverage/) --support universal health care. Universal Childcare. One year of child care costs more than one year of tuition at most states’ four-year public colleges. (https://www.epi.org/child-care-costs-in-the-united-states/) Families need safe, accessible, affordable child care. We can alleviate poverty and change the trajectory of life for millions of American children with a substantial investment in childcare and early childhood education. Read this report from The Economic Policy Institute calling for “An Ambitious National Investment in America’s Children” (https://www.epi.org/publication/its-time-for-an-ambitious-national-investment-in-americas-children/) and sign up to join Childcare Changemakers (https://www.childcarechangemakers.org/) to enlist in the campaign for universal and equitable childcare for all families. Guaranteed Basic Income. Last week we heard from Aisha Nyandoro as she described the ways guaranteed basic income from The Magnolia’s Mother’s Trust (http://springboardto.org/index.php/blog/story/introducing-the-magnolia-mothers-trust) has affected the lives of Black mothers living in poverty in Mississippi. A Stockton, California, guaranteed income program (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-02/stockton-extends-its-universal-basic-income-pilot) has also ignited the interest around the country. If lack of cash is the core feature of poverty, then let’s get cash to the people. Learn about and support the work of the Economic Security Project.  (https://www.economicsecurityproject.org) Ensure Workers’ Right to Organize. Workers must have the right to organize in order to have a seat at the table of power. The power to negotiate wages and conditions of work is tied directly to the ability to organize and unionize. It’s time to update our outdated labor laws to adapt to our 21st century economy. Check out the campaigns of Jobs with Justice (https://www.jwj.org/) and Sign the Pledge (https://actionnetwork.org/forms/sign-the-jobs-with-justice-pledge?&source=NAT_W_homepage) to advance workers’ rights to organize. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter and Facebook pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/podcastsubscribe.
40 min
FriendsLikeUs
FriendsLikeUs
Friends Like Us
The Democratic Divide
Lindsey Boylan is a public servant, a former government official, and mom to her 6-year-old daughter. Lindsey most recently ran for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. House of Representatives, in New York's 10th district in the 2020 elections. Lindsey previously served as Deputy Secretary for Economic Development and Housing, as well as Special Advisor to NY Governor Andrew Cuomo. Her portfolio of oversight included Empire State Development (ESD), the state’s chief economic development agency, for which she previously served as Chief of Staff and Executive Vice President. During her time in government, Lindsey secured hundreds of millions of dollars for underfunded public housing, led the state's efforts to provide assistance for the people of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, and pushed to enact a $15 minimum wage and Paid Family Leave for New Yorkers. She received her degree from Wellesley and an MBA from Columbia. Lindsey is currently a full-time democratic candidate running for Manhattan Borough President. Her platform includes solutions for issues regarding the extreme inequality her borough is facing, a bold plan to increase affordable housing, and support for expanded open spaces to make Manhattan more secure, vibrant, and livable. Check out https://lindseyfornewyork.com to learn more! Tremaine S. Wright is an attorney, entrepreneur, small business owner and activist who is a second-generation Bedford Stuyvesant resident invested in preserving the rich legacy of her community and building a strong foundation for the future. Tremaine was elected to the New York State Assembly on November 8, 2016. She serves the 56th Assembly District of Brooklyn, NY which represents the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Northern Crown Heights neighborhoods. She is Chair of New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic & Asian Legislative Caucus and Chair of the Assembly Subcommittee on Foster Care. She is a graduate of Duke University and the University of Chicago Law School. She has practiced law at Brooklyn Legal Services and private law firms. While working as an attorney at major law firms, Tremaine served as a pro bono lawyer for the Volunteers of Legal Services’ Incarcerated Mothers Project. Through this project, Tremaine advised mothers regarding their parental rights to protect their families. As a volunteer with the City Bar Association’s Neighborhood Entrepreneur Law Project (NELP), Tremaine assisted small business owners and organized the Tompkins Avenue Merchants Association (TAMA). Tremaine also owned and operated Common Grounds: a Neighborhood Coffee House from March 2006 to September 2015. Tremaine realized that her neighborhood lacked an adequate number of eateries and gathering places. Her vision for that space gave birth to Common Grounds A Neighborhood Coffee House with an innovative prize winning business plan lauded by the Brooklyn Public Library. She set out to create a place that would answer that need as well as foster community, provide economic opportunity and enhance commercial activity. Common Grounds did it – it employed local talent, provided stability on a block that was riddled with illicit commerce and provided a place for various segments of our community to intersect and connect. The greatest success of Common Grounds is the impact it has had on the lives of the people who came through its doors in need, and departed full and encouraged. Common Grounds created tangible change in individuals, as well as in community economics. As a Safe Space, Common Grounds was widely recognized as a partner in community empowerment and social justice. As the former Chairwoman of Community Board 3, Tremaine fostered longstanding relationships with past and current elected officials, community leaders and a cross section of local residents committed to improving Central Brooklyn. She has served on CB3 for 13 years and previously held positions as the Executive Secretary, Treasurer and Budget Coordinator. Tremaine still lives on the same block where her grandparents raised their family. She has dedicated her career to empowering and creating opportunities for her neighbors and her community. C. Zawadi Morris is an award-winning journalist and a Chicago native who moved to Brooklyn in 1997. Ms. Morris holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration (and a minor in Spanish) from the University of Illinois and a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. She has worked as the communications director for Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (NY-12), a senior account executive for Shandwick Public Affairs and Cohn & Wolf Public Relations, and an editor of Bed-Stuy Patch. In 2013, Ms. Morris launched The Brooklyn Reader, an online news source covering the neighborhoods of Central Brooklyn, and in 2020, she launched its non-profit sister site Scriibe.org, a collaborative news source for investigative local journalism. Ms. Morris is also the executive producer of The COVID-19 Writers Project. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf
2 hr 4 min
A Little Juju Podcast
A Little Juju Podcast
Juju
Ep. 59 Afrofuturism is Ancient w Ehime Ora
Podcast Intro Beat:  IG: @Nihlis Audio Engineer: Kobe Guilford @Kobewtheshot Sponsorship #1: “Moyo Mysteries is a platform all about providing holistic nourishment through self, cultural, and community empowerment. Moyosant offers spiritual consultations, energy ritual work, pelvic steam plans, and full spectrum doula services, from fertility and birthwork to loss & bereavement and abortion work. Moyosant also offers a variety of educational projects in relation to Black Ancestral Spirituality, Birthwork, Deathwork, Neurodivergence, and Afrofuturism. To learn more, you can visit Moyosant via www.moyomysteries.org .  Also, follow her on Facebook and Instagram under the name, Moyo Mysteries.” So excited to share this interview with Nigerian artist, astrologer, and Sango Priest of the Isese Tradition Iya @EhimeOra. In this episode of @alittlejujupodcast, Ehime discusses how ancestral veneration is Afro-futurism, the ancient practice of Astrology, and the fluidity of gender and sexuality within West African cosmology. So honored to have held this space with such a wonderful teacher. Connect with Ehime: IG: @ehimeora Twitter: @ehimeora Website: https://ehimeora.com/ Donations Make a Monthly donation of $3 or more to A Little Juju Podcast  www.patreon.com/jujubae One time donation: Cashapp: $itsjujubae Paypal: thejujubae@gmail.com Cash app: $itsjujubae Venmo: itsjujubae Hit me up on my site for bookings, media, and site contact! http://www.itsjujubae.com Social media FB: jujubae twitter/ig: itsjujubae Ig:alittlejujupodcast Youtube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChdkuM13q--coEGNtIO7feQ?view_as=subscriber Until January 15th, you get 20% off the Real Talk Session Series’s new Don’t Let These Degrees hoodie when you use code “ITSJUJUBAE” Sponsorship #2 Free shipping AND proceeds go towards funding the creation of educational resources for Black communities! ✊🏾⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ www.realtalksessionseries.org/shop⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #RealTalkSessionSeries #TheRevolutionWillBeDigitized
1 hr 13 min
For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Matthew Croasmun, Drew Collins, Miroslav Volf, Ryan McAnnally-Linz, Evan Rosa
Joyful Recognition, All Is Gift: Four Perspectives on Gratitude in 2020 / Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Sarah Schnitker, Jessica Hooten Wilson, Miroslav Volf
Defining gratitude as joyful recognition, the courage to be grateful, comparing gratitude for self-help vs gratitude in prayer, resilience, seeing all as gift and everything as grace. Featuring: Stacey Floyd-Thomas, Sarah Schnitker, Jessica Hooten Wilson, and Miroslav Volf. Show Notes * 1:07 - Miroslav Volf * Our gratitude for you listeners! * Sometimes complaint comes easier than gratitude, requiring the courage to be grateful. * Misconceptions about gratitude: repayment of debt, obligation to the giver, a strategy for happiness or subjective well-being. * Miroslav’s view of gratitude: Joyful recognition * Gratitude is "joy over the giver, joy over the gift, joy over having received the gift and having been set into relation to the giver marked by freedom.” * 6:45 - Stacey Floyd-Thomas * Slow down and focus on what matters most * Despite what may seem grim in this moment, redeem now as a holy time. * Gratitude as not merely a disposition but an essential duty of defiance and determination that keeps us bound to our first duty: to care for our neighbors as our very best selves. * Maya Angelou: “Let gratitude be the pillow upon which you say your nightly prayer, and let faith be the bridge you build to overcome evil and welcome good.” * 10:18 - Sarah Schnitker * Praying gratitude together as more than self-help * The difference between gratitude as prayer and gratitude as a tool for feeling happier * 14:30 - Jessica Hooten Wilson * “Thank you for the fleas.” Corrie Ten Boom’s _The Hiding Place_ * 1 Thessalonians: “Give thanks in all circumstances." * "All is gift. Even sufferings of many kinds are gifts if we offer them up and allow God to redeem them." * Cultivate a gracious imagination that sees all as grace A recent review from one of our listeners: "So much is happening and our society has rules where we often check our deepest meaning systems at the door. This works until a year like this year when we need to draw on much deeper resources, and we want a way to connect as a community. This group seems committed to softening those isolating norms, and showing us all what that could look like to do so with love and respect." (Donnied48, 10/5/2020, via Apple Podcasts)
20 min
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