Lydia Heberling on How Reading Multimodal Literature Can Support Indigenous Sovereignty
Play • 23 min

University of Washington Doctoral Candidate, Lydia M. Heberling shares how reading multimodal literature -- from canoes, to fish, to comics --  can support Indigenous Sovereignty. Key texts range from "Bad Indians" by Deborah A. Miranda to "Second Serving" by L. Frank. As an episode on multimodal knowledges, key forms include wax cylinder recordings, ti'ats, and Grunion fish. Watch the video edition on our YouTube Channel, "Literature, Language, Culture": ✔︎ http://bit.ly/uwsubscribe.  This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture" Series  Editor and Public Scholarship Project Director, C. R. Grimmer, and  "Literature, Language Culture" Project Manager Jacob Huebsch.

This video is the fifth in a public scholarship dialogue series from  The University of Washington (Seattle Campus) Department of English:  "Literature, Language, Culture." These video and podcast episodes share  our innovative work in fostering intellectual vitality, inspiring  enthusiasm for literature, honing critical insight into the ethical and  creative uses of the English language, preparing future teachers, and  crafting the stories that animate our world.  More on the Department of English at The University of Washington:  ✔︎ https://english.washington.edu/

This episode was produced by the "Literature, Language Culture"  Series Editor, C. R. Grimmer, and "Literature, Language Culture" Project  Manager Jacob Huebsch.

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