Practicing Human
Practicing Human
Oct 26, 2020
How to Do Anything
11 min

In this episode, we discuss the process for meeting and moving through any obstacle so you can get to where you most want to go.

As always, if you'd like to get free access to my resource library, including guided meditations, book recommendations, app recommendations, and more, text your email address to: +1 (631) 337-8298

And if you'd like to get daily inspirational text messages to your phone from me, just text the word "podcast" to +1 (631) 305-2874

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
217: Ask David: Is human "worthwhileness" worthwhile? Why am I always the the last to find out about anything? A Daily Gratitude Log, Positive Reframing and more!
Today's Ask David features four terrific questions. * Kevin asks: Why is the concept of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? * Vallejo asks: Does the statement, "WHY AM I ALWAYS THE LAST ONE TO FIND OUT ABOUT ANYTHING?” correspond to overgeneralization, or self-blame? I’ve been listening to the early podcasts on the ten positive and negative cognitive distortions. * David P asks: Do you think there is anything to be gained from a daily gratitude log, to go along with the daily mood log? * Harvey asks: I don’t see how Positive Reframing actually contributes to the therapy. * Kevin asks: Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Hi David, I have a quick question about the concept of being a worthwhile human being. Suppose a person believes they are unconditionally worthwhile, what are the implications of this? Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Best Regards, Kevin Hi Kevin, Thanks! That’s a very important question. However, it is abstract and philosophical. I have found that philosophical discussions tend to go on endlessly with resolve. In contrast, when someone asks for help with a specific moment when she or he was upset, then I can usually show that person how to change the way she or he is feeling. And when that happens, the person generally suddenly “sees” the solution to some very profound philosophical or spiritual questions. All that being said, I’ll take a crack at it. The goal of TEAM therapy is not to go from thinking that you’re a worthless human being to thinking that you’re a worthwhile human being, but to give up these concepts as nonsensical. Specific activities, talents or thoughts can be more or less worthwhile, but a human being cannot be more or less worthwhile. We can judge specific events, actions, and so forth, but not humans. At least I am not aware of how to validly judge a human being, or a group of humans. We can only judge their actions, attitudes, thoughts, and so forth. Unconditional self-esteem is definitely better than conditional self-esteem, since you don’t have to be perfect or a great achiever or a great anything to be “worthwhile,” but you are still focused on being "worthwhile." I'm not sure what that means, but there is a downside, to my way of thinking. If you think you are worthwhile because you are a human being, does that mean that you are more worthwhile than animals? Lots of people abuse animals, hunt animals, and so forth, which many people find immensely disturbing. These are some of the consequences of thinking that animals are less worthwhile, for example. Not sure that helps, but like your line of questioning! David Kevin follows up: What is the implication then of giving up these concepts at all? I assume that thinking that you have unconditional worthwhileness because you are alive or to drop these concepts entirely have the same emotional implications for people. What are these implications? For example, if I think that worthwhileness and worthlessness are meaningless concepts, so what? What’s the point? What do I gain? Hi Kevin, Let me start by saying, once again, that I am not an evangelist spreading the “gospel,” so to speak. My goal is simply to help people who are struggling with feelings of depression, anxiety, and self-doubt. So, if your way of thinking about things is working for you, there’s no reason to change. But my focus is always on someone who is suffering, and that’s where these concepts can sometimes be important. I can tell you what I gained by giving up the idea that I could be, or needed to be “worthwhile” or “special.” I gained a great deal of joy. It was a lot like escaping from a mental prison. It freed me to find incredible joy in the “ordinary” events of my daily life. It also freed me from fears of “failure” or not being “good enough.” Depression always results from Overgeneralization--you generalize from failing at something specific to thinking you are a failure as a human being. Without Overgeneralization, I think it is safe to say that it is impossible to be depressed. For example, if you measure your worthwhileness based on your achievements and success, you may feel excited when you succeed and devastated or anxious when you fail, or when you are in danger of failing. I'm not sure if this addresses your excellent question! A young woman told herself that she was "unloveable" when she and her boyfriend broke up after two years of going together. Can you see that she thinks she has a "self" that can be "loveable" or "unloveable?" This thought was very disturbing to her, as you might imagine. Relationships do not break up because someone is "unloveable," but because of specific factors or events that drive people apart. Once you zero in on why the relationship failed, or more correctly, why the two of you broke up, then you can pinpoint the causes and learn and grow so you can make your next relationship even better. There are tons of specific reasons why people break up! But if you think that you’re “unloveable,” or tell yourself that the relationship was “a failure,” then you may get stuck in a morass of negative feelings. But it’s not even true that the relationship was a failure.” That’s All-or-Nothing Thinking, since all relationships are a mixture of more or less successful aspects. You could even tell yourself that a “failed” relationship was a partial success, since you successfully learned that this isn’t the person you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. What’s in it for you to give up Overgeneralization and All-or-Nothing Thinking, as well as the concepts of being a “worthwhile” or “worthless” human being? That’s a decision each person can make. There are benefits as well as problems with these ways of thinking. For example, let’s say you’re depressed and think of yourself as “defective.” This is a common negative thought, and it is based on the idea that a human being could be more or less worthwhile, or thinking that your "self" can be judged or rated. So, you could do two Cost-Benefit Analyses. * * First, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a “defective” human being. Then balance the advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale, assigning the larger number to the list that seems more important or desirable. * Second, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a human being with defects, and once again balance the list of advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale. This is just a subtle change in semantics, but the emotional implications can sometimes be pretty powerful. As I mentioned at the top, philosophical debates are just debates. Fun, perhaps, but not terribly useful. I’m more interested in magic, or miracles. That’s what happens at the moment of profound change, which can ONLY happen by focusing on one specific moment when you felt upset and needed help. When you do that, everything becomes radically different, and real change can occur. And at that magic moment of change, the solutions to all of the problems of philosophy will often suddenly become crystal clear. Or, to put it differently, the philosophical debates will suddenly become, without meaning to sound harsh, almost a waste of previous time. Our current semi-feral cat loves my wife, but is only starting to trust me, so I’ve been working at gaining her trust and learning to understand her non-verbal and somewhat complex efforts to communicate. Yesterday she roller over on her back and stretch out her front and back paws to expose her tummy to the max, and she let me pet her tummy for quite a long time, purring loudly the whole time. I don’t car…
1 hr 2 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
173. Confidence, Self-Doubt, and Overcoming Limitations with Our New Team Member, Michael Herold
In his TEDx talk, Michael Herold, public speaker, confidence coach, and podcaster extraordinaire, says, “Things you will achieve in your life, you will achieve because of your disability, not in spite of it.” In this week’s episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Michael talks with Debbie and Yael about confidence, self-doubt, and overcoming limitations. Limitations are all around us. These might be thoughts about how unqualified we are, feelings of anxiety, or even physical disabilities such as spinal muscular atrophy, but Michael Herold has some good news. We can overcome the limitations that come from our own heads, by taking Comfort Zone Challenges! Join us in this episode to learn about how to work with those limitations, instead of against them, to achieve the life you want.  The Psychologists Off the Clock are excited to welcome Michael aboard as our new Strategic Consultant. Join us to for this episode to meet Michael and learn about our new team member!  Listen and Learn How to build confidence and step outside your comfort zone About Michael’s transition from animator to public speaker, coach, and podcaster  Why Acceptance and Commitment Therapy resonates with Michael and how it changed his life  How Michael’s disability, spinal muscular atrophy, has shaped his unique perspective  How you can use values to overcome your limitations About motivational porn and the microaggressions we often use when discussing people who have ‘overcome’ disability-related limitations Why it’s so important to connect with people and how to do that  Inside information on how Coach Michael works to build his clients’ confidence  Tips and tricks from the master himself on how to build your own confidence Resources from this Podcast Episode Michael's TEDx talk  Michael’s website Michael's podcast: The Art of Charm   The Art of Charm Podcast's Episode featuring Michael  The Art of Charm Podcast's Core Confidence Program  Viktor Frankl's Book: Man's Search for Meaning  Michael’s Short Film “When I grow up” All of Michael’s short animated films  Michael Herold   About Michael Herold Early in his life, doctors told Michael Herold’s parents that his severe disability would keep him from living a normal life. The doctors were right. Michael’s life has been anything but normal. In fact, he is quite a renaissance man. For over a decade, Michael was a successful animator for Nickelodeon and worked on a variety of shows including Penguins of Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda. He currently does public speaking around the world and has recently spoken in front of parliament and given a TEDx talk. Michael also uses skills and exercises from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to provide coaching on a variety of life-skills including public speaking, self-doubt, communication, and, primarily, confidence. Visit Michael’s website to find out more!      Episode 91. Disability as a Form of Diversity with Dr. Erin Andrews Episode 169. Microaggressions, Mental Health Disparities, and Racial Trauma with Monnica Williams Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran Episode 32. Social Connection: Exploring Loneliness and Building Intimacy
1 hr 16 min
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
Gabe Howard (A Psych Central Podcast)
Reframing Past Traumas
What is your life story? Do you feel like a victim of your circumstances? And if so, how does this affect your future? In today’s show, our guest James Sweigert, who struggled out of a traumatic childhood, shares how the power of his thoughts and the spoken word changed his life. Are you ready to make some edits to your life story? Tune in, and James will help you go from your head to your heart so you can win the game. For more information and a complete transcript, visit Podcast: Reframing Past Traumas. Guest Information for 'James Sweigert- Reframing Traumas' Podcast Episode James Sweigert’s childhood was challenging, to say the least. James struggled to be seen and stay safe amid the chaos, eventually turning to drugs and alcohol to cope. This self-destructive pattern continued until he changed his story—and his life. Today James is a successful executive producer and director in film and television and coaches many creative executives and celebrities in Hollywood. He has built, run and sold several multi-million dollar, award winning production companies in Hollywood. He writes about a key truth: the way you conceptualize your life—the story you tell yourself—makes it what it is. If you say so. As a motivational speaker and “Life Cheerleader”, James’s ultimate purpose is to help others change their old “stories” to transform their lives so they can flourish and be amazing! About The Psych Central Podcast Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
28 min
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast
Shannon Crow
195: LGBTQ Awareness for Yoga Teachers with Tristan Katz
The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast 195: LGBTQ Awareness for Yoga Teachers with Tristan Katz Description: We can all agree that we want our yoga classes to be safe places for everybody. However, one group of marginalized people who are often not taken into consideration is the LGBTQ community. The LGBTQ community has historically been persecuted and has experienced violence, at the provincial or state, national, institutional and personal levels, which makes it all the more important for us to create and maintain safe and inclusive spaces for them in our classes. How can we bring awareness about them to our yoga spaces, and create inclusive safe spaces for them? Tristan Katz (they/them) has some insights to give us a better understanding of the LGBTQ community, based on their personal lived experience and their work in the space of equity-inclusion. Tristan is a business and marketing coach-consultant, web and graphic designer based in Portland, OR. Part of Tristan’s intention in their work is to support teachers, practitioners, studios, and spiritual communities seeking to facilitate safer, braver spaces. To this end, Tristan is currently studying with experts in the field to expand their equity-inclusion facilitation and education offerings, in addition to teaching workshops and trainings centered around queer identity and LGBTQ+ awareness with an anti-oppression and intersectional lens. Conversations around creating such inclusive spaces for people in the LGBTQ commmunity can be uncomfortable, and we may not always know how to approach this topic. Tristan speaks openly and honestly to share more about the experiences people in this community have, and how we can do better. They give us a breakdown of common terms, cues and language; what we as yoga teachers can do to be more aware and inclusive in our classes, and what to do when we mess up, which is something that will inevitably happen. For anyone looking to learn more about how to create more inclusive spaces in their yoga classes, this episode is a must-listen. Key Takeaways: [10:18] Shannon introduces her guest for this episode - Tristan Katz. [12:28] Where did Tristan's yoga journey begin and how did it lead them to the work that they do now? [18:28] Tristan defines some terms they have used as well as appropriate language to use to create inclusive spaces. [25:26] What is Tristan's response to yoga teachers who may be worried that introducing pronouns in their yoga classes may cause their students discomfort? [29:45] Tristan explains a little more about trans identity and the gender binary. [31:51] When asking for someone's pronouns, avoid saying "preferred pronouns". Tristan shares why. [34:20] Shannon and Tristan discuss how to approach people who have multiple pronouns e.g. she/ they. [38:52] Grammar is not an issue when using they/them pronouns for individuals! It is an argument that is rooted in transphobia. [40:49] Some cues and language in yoga classes tend to be gendered. How does Tristan help yoga teachers navigate this? [44:31] Tristan shares how they consciously and intentionally focus on acknowledging that everyone's experiences are different and being sensitive to that. [46:34] How do niches that focus exclusively on one particular gender feel to non-binary people? [51:02] If you offer inclusivity trainings, or have taken one that you appreciated, please share it in the comments. [52:02] What are Tristan's thoughts on how to express ourselves such that everyone feels included and safe? [57:01] Societal systems and structures impact all of us differently, depending on our identities, but that doesn't mean we can't all be part of different movements to dismantle these toxic structures. [59:17] Shannon shares some of her experiences with creating inclusive spaces in the world. [1:01:21] Apart from their work with equity-inclusion, Tristan is also a digital strategist who supports yoga teachers in their businesses. [1:03:18] Shannon shares her key takeaways from this interview with Tristan. Links: * Tristan Katz * LGBTQ Awareness: For Yoga Teachers, by Tristan Katz * LGBTQ Equity-Inclusion: Actionable Steps for Yoga Teachers, by Tristan Katz * Inclusivity Trainings by Tristan * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 092: Accessible Yoga Begins with Language with Kesse Hodge, Chantel Ehler and Katie Juelson * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 138: Accessible Yoga Beyond Asana with Jivana Heyman * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 108: Inclusive Language for Prenatal Yoga with Shannon Crow * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 146: How to Empower Your Yoga Students with Yonnie Fung * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 189: Your Movement Science is Racist with Jesal Parikh * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Episode 173: Social Justice, Politics & Yoga with Chara Caruthers and Maria Kirsten * The Connected Yoga Teacher Podcast Bonus Episode: Anti-Racism & Yoga with Michelle Johnson * Trans Yoga Project * Trans Yoga Project (Patreon) * Pelvic Health Professionals Gratitude to our Sponsor Schedulicity. . Quotes from this episode: "We all make assumptions based on appearances, but we can't know the truth of somebody's life experience or identity based on appearances." - Tristan "There is this level of toxicity that's in dominant culture that we often can bring into this yoga space unconsciously or consciously." - Tristan "When we're witnessing others' discomfort around that conversation, it's an opportunity for us to model and educate and inform." - Tristan "Gender is a much more nuanced conversation than we've all been taught." - Tristan "We can't just make these vast assumptions and generalizations. We're potentially putting people into sympathetic arousal when we do." - Tristan "Anytime you gender something, you're excluding some people in the room, you're potentially triggering other people in the room." - Tristan
1 hr 9 min
Unapologetically Sensitive
Unapologetically Sensitive
Patricia Young
Bonus Episode 86 Struggling on Thanksgiving—Boundaries and More. Sigh
TITLE Struggling on Thanksgiving—Boundaries and More. Sigh GUEST Solo Episode EPISODE OVERVIEW I’m needing to set some boundaries, and I’m having the eternal struggle of many Highly Sensitive People (HSPs)—I know what I need to do, but I’m the only one who sees the problems, the risks and I feel alone in this. I’m realizing that it would be easier if everyone agreed with me, but my growth has to be about ME feeling ok with boundaries I need to set, even if no one else understands. I can share my thoughts and wishes, but it’s got to be up to me to reassure myself that I can trust what I need. PODCAST HOST Patricia is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, and Coach. She knows what it’s like to feel like an outcast, misfit, and truthteller. Learning about the trait of being a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP), helped Patricia rewrite her history with a deeper understanding, appreciation, and a sense of self-compassion. She created the podcast Unapologetically Sensitive to help other HSPs know that they aren’t alone, and that being an HSP has amazing gifts, and some challenges. Patricia works online globally working individually with people, and she teaches Online Courses for HSPs that focus on understanding what it means to be an HSP, self-care, self-compassion, boundaries, perfectionism, mindfulness, communication, and creating a lifestyle that honors us LINKS HSP Online Course--https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/hsp-online-groups/ December 2020 Holiday/End of Year Groups--https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/holiday-groups/ Podcast Survey-- https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe-fAYIyFgVb0VHlDorfm8ZdXClCcYDlv0cSP2RXZSZY16SIQ/viewform Receive the top 10 most downloaded episodes of the podcast-- https://www.subscribepage.com/e6z6e6 Sign up for the Newsletter-- https://www.subscribepage.com/y0l7d4 To write a review in itunes: * click on this link https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/unapologetically-sensitive/id1440433481?mt=2 * select “listen on Apple Podcasts” * chose “open in itunes” * choose “ratings and reviews” * click to rate the number of starts * click “write a review” Website--www.unapologeticallysensitive.com Facebook-- https://www.facebook.com/Unapologetically-Sensitive-2296688923985657/ Closed/Private Facebook group Unapologetically Sensitive-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/2099705880047619/ Closed/Private Facebook group for therapists and healers-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/208565440423641/ Instagram-- https://www.instagram.com/unapologeticallysensitive/ Youtube-- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOE6fodj7RBdO3Iw0NrAllg/videos?view_as=subscriber Tik Tok-- https://www.tiktok.com/@hsppodcast e-mail-- unapologeticallysensitive@gmail.com Show hashtag--#unapologeticallysensitive Shelly Aaron Productions—https://www.shellyaaron.com/ Music-- Gravel Dance by Andy Robinson www.andyrobinson.com
16 min
The One You Feed
The One You Feed
Eric Zimmer|Wondery
363: Cory Allen on Cultivating Mindfulness
Cory Allen is a writer, musician, meditation teacher, and creator of the podcast, The Astral Hustle, which focuses on how to live better with leading experts in mindfulness, neuroscience, and philosophy. Cory believes that the more we understand ourselves, the less we suffer. In this episode, Cory and Eric discuss his book, Now Is The Way: An Unconventional Approach To Modern Mindfulness. But wait – there’s more! The episode is not quite over!! We continue the conversation and you can access this exclusive content right in your podcast player feed. Head over to our Patreon page and pledge to donate just $10 a month. It’s that simple and we’ll give you good stuff as a thank you! In This Interview, Cory Allen and I Discuss Cultivating Mindfulness and… * His book, Now Is The Way: An Unconventional Approach To Modern Mindfulness * The role of our actions in determining who we are * How to differentiate between helpful and unhelpful negative thoughts and emotions * The most effective way to widen the gap between stimulus and response * The watching mind and the doing mind * Why the notions of emptiness and non-self needn’t be scary * The answer to the question, “Does my life even matter?” * How we assign meaning rather than find meaning in life * What it means to dilute strong emotions or ruminating thoughts when they arise Cory Allen Links: www.cory-allen.org Twitter Instagram BLUBlox offers high-quality lenses that filter blue light, reduce glare, and combat the unhealthy effects of our digital life. Visit BLUblox.com and get free shipping worldwide and also 15% off with Promo Code: WOLF15 SimpliSafe: Get comprehensive protection for your entire home with security cameras, alarms, sensors as well as fire, water, and carbon monoxide alerts. SimpliSafe is having a huge holiday sale! Visit simplisafe.com/wolf for a free home security camera and 40% off any security system.  Pachamama: Produces extraordinary high quality, organic CBD products. They are one of three companies in over 200 top selling CBD brands to actually test negative for leads, metals, and pesticides and test positive for having the right amount of CBD. Visit www.enjoypachamama.com and use code WOLF for 25% off. If you enjoyed this conversation with Cory Allen on Cultivating Mindfulness, you might also enjoy these other episodes: Effortless Mindfulness with Loch Kelly Transformative Mindfulness with Shauna Shapiro
56 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu