Design Time
Design Time
Nov 19, 2020
Design Powerhouse Couple Yolanda Edwards and Matt Hranek on Their Favorite Things to Collect, the Beauty of a Prefab Home, and the Road Less Taken
Play • 37 min

Matt Hranek and Yolanda Edwards are what most would call a creative power couple. Throughout their careers, they have worked together and separately for some of the most dynamic and inspiring publications, documenting their travels, food, and homes for digital and print, and solidifying a loyal following that trusts their every move. Each recommendation they put out there—where to go, where to eat, what to drink, what to shop for—and, most important, how to document it, is supported by vibrant images and heartfelt storytelling. Memory keeping and collecting are central to Matt and Yolanda’s perspective. They are gifted editors, prolific content creators, and trusted curators who are generous with their knowledge and always up to share a recommendation or a story to give their suggestions more weight. After leaving Condé Nast Traveler, they each launched independent print magazines, WM Brown and YOLO Journal, while engaging their loyal audience on Instagram and consulting for brands. As we approach the holidays, we catch up with Matt and Yolanda to talk about how they’re celebrating the holidays, even on a smaller scale this year.

Breaking Beauty Podcast
Breaking Beauty Podcast
Dear Media, Jill Dunn and Carlene Higgins
How to Repair Your Skin Barrier With Celebrity Facialist Joanna Vargas
We’re chatting with facialist-to-the-stars, Joanna Vargas! Joanna counts famous faces like Mindy Kaling and Rachel Brosnahan among her elite clientele. On top of heading up her branded spas in both Manhattan and L.A. and running her eponymous skincare business, Joanna is author of the essential skincare guide, “Glow From Within.” In today’s episode, we’re learning about skin barrier health 101, untangling the biggest culprits that lead to a damaged skin barrier (like, are exfoliating toners as villainous as they’re made out to be?) and how to know when yours has been compromised. Stay tuned as Joanna shares her top tips for maintaining and repairing a damaged skin barrier, as we discuss everything from skincare “slugging,” to whether humidifiers can actually help to the holy grail products she swears by. But first, we’re kicking it off with a mini “damn goods” review in partnership with one of todays’ show partners, Strivectin. Find out why the brand’s timely new Wrinkle Recode Moisture Rich Barrier Cream had us feeling moist and cocooned all holiday long. Get social with us and let us know what you think of the episode! Find us on Instagram, Twitter, Join our private Facebook group , or give us a call and leave us a voicemail at 1-844-227-0302. For any products or links mentioned in this episode, check out our blog: www.breakingbeautypodcast.com/blog Thank you to our show partners. When you support them, you support the creation of Breaking Beauty Podcast! Strivectin StriVectin Wrinkle Recode Moisture Rich Barrier Cream addresses key signs of a compromised skin barrier thanks to its 1:1:1 Biomimetic Lipid Ratio and NIA-114, StriVectin’s patented form of Niacin backed by over three decades of research. New email subscribers receive 15% off their first order. Coola Get 10% off your first order of COOLA Organic Skincare on COOLA.com using code BEAUTY. *Disclaimer: Unless otherwise stated, all products reviewed are gratis media samples submitted for editorial consideration.* Hosts: Carlene Higgins and Jill Dunn Theme song, used with permission: Cherry Bomb by Saya Produced by Dear Media Studio
42 min
Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso
Girlboss Radio with Sophia Amoruso
Girlboss Radio
Sasheer Zamata on the Power of Creating Your Own Content
Sasheer Zamata is a comedian, actress, and writer. She has not only broken into the entertainment industry—but into the notoriously cut throat world of comedy. You may have seen her flash her comedic style as a cast member on Saturday Night Live. She also made many comedy best-of lists, including Cosmopolitan, 13 Funny Women to Watch, and Timeout New York's top 10 funniest women in NYC.  Sasheer is booked and busy: She's appeared on The Late Night with Stephen Colbert, Netflix's The Last O.G., Hulu's Woke, as well as in films like The Weekend and I Feel Pretty with Amy Schumer. She's also performed at places like Bonnaroo, South by Southwest, New York Comedy Festival, and so many others. Her stand-up special, Pizza Mind, is available on Amazon Prime, and she is one half of the podcast Best Friends, with Nicole Byer, her BFF, and host of Nailed It!.  If that wasn't enough, she also serves as the celebrity ambassador for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and works with the Women's Rights Project.  In today's episode with Sophia, Sasheer talks about why she decided to break into comedy after college, why she doesn't believe in getting a big break, and why there's no better time than now to be a content creator. Sign up for the Girlboss Daily to receive tips on work, life, and how to chase (and reach!) your dreams: https://bit.ly/30A14AL  Follow Sasheer on Instagram at @thesheertruth and Twitter at @thesheertruth Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
41 min
The Brain Architects
The Brain Architects
Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Connecting Health and Learning Part II: The Implications
How do we use the science of early childhood development to implement practical strategies and overcome longstanding barriers in the early childhood field? How can we ensure that families' voices are heard when we create policies or programs? Contents Podcast Panelists Additional Resources Transcript To kick off this episode, Center Director Dr. Jack Shonkoff describes what the science means for policymakers, system leaders, care providers, and caregivers. This is followed by a discussion among a distinguished panel of experts, including Cindy Mann (Manatt Health), Dr. Aaliyah Samuel (Northwest Evaluation Association), and Jane Witowski (Help Me Grow). The panelists discuss how we can break down the silos in the early childhood field, policies affecting prenatal-three, and how policies can change to address the stressors inflicted by poverty, community violence, and racism. Panelists Cindy Mann Dr. Aaliyah Samuel Jane Witowski Additional Resources Resources from the Center on the Developing Child Working Paper 15: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body: Early Childhood Development and Lifelong Health Are Deeply Intertwined InBrief: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body Health and Learning Are Deeply Interconnected in the Body: An Action Guide for Policymakers What Is Inflammation? And Why Does it Matter for Child Development? How Racism Can Affect Child Development Resources from the Panelists Testing America's Freedom Podcast Help Me Grow National Center Transcript Sally: Welcome to the Brain Architects, a podcast from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. I'm your host, Sally Pfitzer. Our Center believes that advances in science can provide a powerful source of new ideas that can improve outcomes for children and families. We want to help you apply the science of early childhood development to your everyday interactions with children and take what you're hearing from our experts and panels and apply it to your everyday work.  Today, we'll discuss how the science we shared in our previous episode, on the early years and lifelong health, can change the way we think about early childhood policy and practice, and what this shift means for policymakers, practitioners, and caregivers. So, I'd like to welcome back Dr. Jack Shonkoff, Professor of Child Health and Development and the Director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. Hi, Jack. Welcome back.  Jack: Hey, Sally.  Sally:  So we talked in the last episode about how the brain is connected to the rest of the body, and especially how the early years really matter when it comes to lifelong health. What does this science mean for policymakers, system leaders, or even caregivers?  Jack: That's a really important question, Sally. From the beginning of the early childhood field, it's always been focused on early learning and improving children's readiness to succeed in school. In the policy world, it's in education policy, comes out of the education budget. For people who work in early childhood programs, and for parents, it's about programs that encourage and provide rich learning opportunities for children to develop early literacy competencies.  But the mindset shift here is that it's not just about early learning in school—it's about the foundations of physical and mental health. It's not just about improving outcomes for greater economic productivity—better educational achievement. It's also about decreasing the likelihood that you'll develop heart disease or hypertension, or diabetes, or a wide range of the most common chronic illnesses in society. It's not just a matter of return on investment—asking “So, how much more economically productive will the population be? How much will we save in incarceration?” It's also how much will we save in the cost of health care.
45 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu