Keen On
Keen On
Oct 30, 2020
Ian Buruma: Has Tragedy Turned to Farce?
26 min

On today's episode, author and thinker Ian Buruma discusses the synergy when it comes to nationalism between the U.S. and the U.K.

Ian Buruma teaches at Bard College. His books include A Tokyo RomanceTheir Promised LandYear ZeroThe China LoverMurder in AmsterdamOccidentalismGod's DustBehind the MaskThe Wages of GuiltBad Elements, and Taming the Gods.

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New Books Network
New Books Network
Marshall Poe
D. T. Lawrence and E. J. Lawless, "When They Blew the Levee: Race, Politics, and Community in Pinhook, Missouri" (UP of Mississippi, 2018)
The town of Pinhook in Missouri was founded in the 1940s by southern Black farmers who were looking for land that they could purchase and own in the face of limited options. It was low land that was often flooded, but the farmers were able to clear it and successfully farm it for decades to come while building up a small town. However, in 2011, after heavy rains and historic flooding, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to breach the Birds Point levee. Pinhook, directly in the flood zone, was completely destroyed. David Todd Lawrence and Elaine Lawless, in their book When They Blew the Levee: Race, Politics, and Community in Pinhook, Missouri (University Press of Mississippi, 2018), document the narratives of the town’s former residents which counter the official story from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers - that the levee breach was a success story of saved lives and property. Winner of the 2019 Chicago Folklore Prize, the book offers a vivid portrait of the town’s efforts to rebuild and maintain their community ties, and theorizes the destruction and government neglect of this town. In our conversation, Dr. Lawrence and Dr. Lawless discuss the events that led to the flooding of Pinhook and the question of historical racism in overlooking the town when the decision was made to breach the levee. The authors describe life and community in the town of Pinhook and what happened after the flood. We also talk about the role and responsibilities of the researcher when collaborating with communities. Lastly, we hear about Debra Robinson-Tarver who organized the evacuation of the residents and continued to keep the Pinhook community together as they pursued recompense. You can learn more about the efforts to rebuild Pinhook here and the documentary film Taking Pinhook can be viewed here. Dr. David Todd Lawrence is an Associate Professor who teaches folklore and African American literature and culture at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is currently working with the Urban Art Mapping Project on street art in the Twin Cities. Since the murder of George Floyd in May 2020, they have been collecting images of street art related to the movement for the George Floyd and Anti-Racist Street Art database. If you would like to contribute images, please submit them here or email Dr. Lawrence directly at DTLAWRENCE@stthomas.edu. Dr. Elaine Lawless is Professor Emerita at the University of Missouri where she taught folklore and Women’s and Gender Studies. She is the author of six books, including Troubling Violence: A Performance Project (University Press of Mississippi, 2010). Dr. Lawless is currently based in North Carolina. Nancy Yan received her PhD in folklore from The Ohio State University and taught First Year Writing, Comparative Studies, and Asian American studies for several years before returning to organizing work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 8 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Why are Billions of Dollars Worth of Ships Being Intentionally Destroyed?
This is the Carnival Imagination, a luxury cruise liner worth hundreds of millions of dollars, which just 10 short months ago was touring passengers in extreme comfort to exotic destinations all over the world.  This ship is sailing dead ahead to its final port of call, where it has been sold for scrap alongside dozens of other ships that have become the latest victims of the global pandemic.  The Chittagong ship breaking yard in Bangladesh is the largest of its kind in the world, and in the past few months even its abundant shores have become inundated with pleasure cruises and industrial cargo ships alike that all could have otherwise sailed the oceans for many more decades.  These are all very troubling signs for the unsung heroes of our modern global economy, the merchant marine fleet. Every year trillions of dollars worth of cargo is transported on ships like these and losing this fleet could turn into a huge barrier to global trade. But what is really going on here? Why would profit-motivated companies destroy billions of dollars worth of productive assets? Sure times are tough, tourism and trade have declined massively but this hardly looks like a reasonable response right? I don’t burn down my house if a video gets less than 10,000 likes, so why would companies in such a competitive industry do something equally as self-destructive? Well as always it has to do with economics (go figure) and to understand this bizarre behavior we need to understand a few key areas. * What are the economics behind the merchant marine fleet? * How do these factors make it financially viable to destroy ships? * what does this mean for the future of international trade? * And what does this all have to do with Chinese bridge building?
14 min
New Books in History
New Books in History
Marshall Poe
D. T. Lawrence and E. J. Lawless, "When They Blew the Levee: Race, Politics, and Community in Pinhook, Missouri" (UP of Mississippi, 2018)
The town of Pinhook in Missouri was founded in the 1940s by southern Black farmers who were looking for land that they could purchase and own in the face of limited options. It was low land that was often flooded, but the farmers were able to clear it and successfully farm it for decades to come while building up a small town. However, in 2011, after heavy rains and historic flooding, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers decided to breach the Birds Point levee. Pinhook, directly in the flood zone, was completely destroyed. David Todd Lawrence and Elaine Lawless, in their book When They Blew the Levee: Race, Politics, and Community in Pinhook, Missouri (University Press of Mississippi, 2018), document the narratives of the town’s former residents which counter the official story from the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers - that the levee breach was a success story of saved lives and property. Winner of the 2019 Chicago Folklore Prize, the book offers a vivid portrait of the town’s efforts to rebuild and maintain their community ties, and theorizes the destruction and government neglect of this town. In our conversation, Dr. Lawrence and Dr. Lawless discuss the events that led to the flooding of Pinhook and the question of historical racism in overlooking the town when the decision was made to breach the levee. The authors describe life and community in the town of Pinhook and what happened after the flood. We also talk about the role and responsibilities of the researcher when collaborating with communities. Lastly, we hear about Debra Robinson-Tarver who organized the evacuation of the residents and continued to keep the Pinhook community together as they pursued recompense. You can learn more about the efforts to rebuild Pinhook here and the documentary film Taking Pinhook can be viewed here. Dr. David Todd Lawrence is an Associate Professor who teaches folklore and African American literature and culture at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is currently working with the Urban Art Mapping Project on street art in the Twin Cities. Since the murder of George Floyd in May 2020, they have been collecting images of street art related to the movement for the George Floyd and Anti-Racist Street Art database. If you would like to contribute images, please submit them here or email Dr. Lawrence directly at DTLAWRENCE@stthomas.edu. Dr. Elaine Lawless is Professor Emerita at the University of Missouri where she taught folklore and Women’s and Gender Studies. She is the author of six books, including Troubling Violence: A Performance Project (University Press of Mississippi, 2010). Dr. Lawless is currently based in North Carolina. Nancy Yan received her PhD in folklore from The Ohio State University and taught First Year Writing, Comparative Studies, and Asian American studies for several years before returning to organizing work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 8 min
Materialism
Materialism
Taylor Sparks and Andrew Falkowski
Episode 28: μ: Investing in Materials Startups
Every new startup requires capital, but most venture capital groups are very cautious about investing in materials companies due to the typically long timeframe for development. In this episode we talk to a Matt Cohen, Director of Technology at Pangaea Ventures. Matt talks about why their company dares to invest primarily in materials companies. He tells us about some of the investments they make, and the impact they have. Matt and the team also discuss how you can start your own startup as well as recommending some books to get you started. If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com. Make sure to subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify, google play, and now Youtube or wherever you find your podcasts. If you like the show and want to help us reach more people, consider leaving a review - it helps us improve and it exposes new people to the show. Finally, check out our Instagram page @materialism.podcast and connect with us to let us know what new material you’d like to hear about next. We’d like to give a shoutout to AlphaBot for allowing us to use his music within the podcast. Check him out on Spotify. And as always a special thanks to Kolobyte who created the intro and outro for our podcast. He makes a ton of really cool synthwave music which you can check out at kolobyte.bandcamp.com. Also visit our sponsors for this episode The American Ceramic Society Arts Archeology & Conservation Science division, www.materialstoday.com, and matmatch.com. Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/materialism.podcast/?hl=en Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaterialismPod Visit our website: www.materialismpodcast.com Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-creator, co-host, production), Andrew Falkowski (co-creator, co-host, production), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing) Support Materialism by donating to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism
Climate One
Climate One
Climate One at The Commonwealth Club
Breaking Through: A Year of Climate Conversations
“Unprecedented” is one of the most overused words of 2020, even if it reflects the superstorm of disruption brought on by an overlapping pandemic, racial justice awakening, and presidential election. For the first time ever, climate change galvanized a record number of voters to elect Joe Biden to the Presidency. How has the focus on climate shifted in a year shaped by multiple social and economic crises? Join us for a look back on a year of climate conversations like no other. Visit climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts for more information on today's episode. Guests (in order of appearance): Justin Worland, Senior Climate Correspondent, TIME Katharine Wilkinson, Vice President, Project Drawdown Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Marine Biologist; co-author, All We Can Save: Truth, Courage and Solutions for the Climate Crisis Darryl Molina Sarmiento, Executive Director, Communities for a Better Environment Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Councillor; Former President, California State Senate Susan Clayton, Professor of Psychology; Chair of Environmental Studies, College of Wooster Peter Atwater, Adjunct Professor of Economics, College of William & Mary Aaron Bernstein, Interim Director of The Center for Climate Health and the Global Environment, Harvard School of Public Health Amy Jaffe, Director, Program on Energy Security and Climate Change, Council on Foreign Relations Kathleen Day, Finance Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University Tamara Toles O’Laughlin, North America Director, 350.org Gina McCarthy, President, NRDC Action Fund; Former Administrator, U.S. EPA Saul Griffith, Founder and Chief Scientist, Otherlab Chase Purdy, Author, Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Tech’s Race for the Future of Food Sophie Egan, Author, How to Be a Conscious Eater: Making Food Choices That Are Good for You, Others, and the Planet Hui He, China Regional Director, International Council on Clean Transportation Colin McKerracher, Head of Transport Analysis, BloombergNEF
51 min
About Buildings + Cities
About Buildings + Cities
Luke Jones & George Gingell Discuss Architecture, History and Culture
75 — Jane Jacobs — 1/2 — Eyes on the Street
The first episode in a two-part series on Jane Jacobs, a profoundly influential writer, thinker and campaigner on issues of urbanism, whose magnum opus 'The Death and Life of Great American Cities' (1961) forms the backbone of our discussion. In it, Jacobs lays out an idealised vision of tight-knit, dense communities, inspired by her time living in Greenwich Village, Manhattan. It is a vision of an interconnected, urban way of life dominated by local small-scale agents: families, independent businesses and community ties from which emerge vitality, security and comfort in densely populated streets of tenements with wide sidewalks and endless lines of sight across the bustling public spaces. Jacobs' work was a rejection of many sacred cows of modernist planning, espoused by architects and bureaucrats alike: questions of density, scale, urban grain, transportation and space. Jacobs felt that their efforts rarely supported the vitality and energy she found so alluring in the tenements of Greenwich Village. Subscribe to our Patreon for a discussion of one of the infrastructure projects Jacobs campaigned against: Robert Moses and the Lower Manhattan Expressway. Also, we just reached 1 million listens on this feed! Thank you so much for all your support, we couldn't have done it without you. Remember to tell a friend, and give the show a review if you enjoyed it. Our sponsor for this episode is Blue Crow Media, who produce gorgeous architectural maps of different cities, including Pyongyang, Tbilisi and New York. Use the offer code aboutbuildings for 10% off your next purchase! Edited by Matthew Lloyd Roberts. Support the show on Patreon to receive bonus content for every show. Please rate and review the show on your podcast store to help other people find us! Follow us on twitter // instagram // facebook We’re on the web at aboutbuildingsandcities.org This podcast is powered by Pinecast.
Weekly Economics Podcast
Weekly Economics Podcast
New Economics Foundation
Finding hope during and after the pandemic
Joe Biden has defeated Donald Trump to win the US election. Test results from around the world suggest that a coronavirus vaccine is on the horizon. Over the past month there have been more bright spots than usual in a difficult, painful year. At the same time, with the number of coronavirus deaths at their highest since May, many parts of the country still subject to severe restrictions and unemployment skyrocketing, many of us are hesitant to declare that the worst days are behind us. So, how has this year affected our mental health? How can progressives stay well enough to fight for change? And have we forgotten how to feel hopeful? Ayeisha is joined by researcher and author, Christine Berry and Farzana Khan, executive director and co-founder of Healing Justice London. If you have been affected by anything discussed in this episode, you can contact the Samaritans for free at 116 123 or visit https://www.samaritans.org/ Further reading/watching from this episode: -The Impact of COVID 19 on Disabled Women from Sisters of Frida: http://www.sisofrida.org/the-impact-of-covid-19-on-disabled-women-from-sisters-of-frida/ -Healing Justice London: https://healingjusticeldn.org/ -Rebecca Solnit, Hope in the Dark: https://uk.bookshop.org/books/hope-in-the-dark-untold-histories-wild-possibilities/9781782119074 -Joanna Macy, Active Hope https://uk.bookshop.org/books/active-hope-how-to-face-the-mess-we-re-in-without-going-crazy/9781577319726 ----- Researched by Margaret Welsh. Produced by Becky Malone. Music by Poddington Bear and Chris Zabriskie under Creative Commons license. Enjoying the show? Tweet us your comments and questions @NEF! The Weekly Economics Podcast is brought to you by the New Economics Foundation. Find out more at www.neweconomics.org
53 min
The Anthill
The Anthill
The Conversation
Recovery part six – 2008 financial crisis and lessons for today
The 2008 financial crisis resulted in the worst global recession since the second world war. The collapse of US investment bank Lehman Brothers in September 2008 caused a meltdown of the global financial system. Money markets froze and there was a major credit crunch as the ability to borrow money suddenly dried up.  To stop contagion and make sure other major financial institutions didn’t collapse, governments stepped in to shore up the system by bailing out the banks. Anastasia Nesvetailova, professor of international political economy at City, University of London, explains what these bailouts involved and why they were so necessary.  Aidan Regan, associate professor at University College Dublin, tells us how the crisis spread across the eurozone and why some countries rebounded a lot more quickly than others. We also discuss how the austerity policies that many governments adopted following the 2008 financial crisis hampered economic growth.  And we explore how emerging markets such as Brazil and China were affected by the 2008 financial crisis. Carolina Alves, fellow in economics at the University of Cambridge, outlines how they were shielded from some elements of the crisis but also left vulnerable to the large reduction in finance that followed.  You can read more research into the 2008 financial crisis and what lessons we can learn from it for today's coronavirus recovery alongside other articles in our Recovery series, which accompany this podcast. This episode was produced by Gemma Ware and Annabel Bligh, with sound design by Eloise Stevens. The Anthill is a podcast from The Conversation UK. We’re an independent news media outlet that exists purely to take reliable, informed voices direct to a wide audience. If you’re able to to support our work, please consider donating via our website. Thanks to everyone who has already done so. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
42 min
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