AdExchanger
AdExchanger
Apr 14, 2020
Social Distancing With Friends: Bob Liodice
Play episode · 25 min

Bob Liodice, president and CEO of the Association of National Advertisers, is at his computer by 6 a.m. every morning until nearly 7 p.m. every night talking to CMOs as they try to navigate the coronavirus craziness together. Evenings you can find him with his family on Long Island rediscovering the joy of board games. New favorite: The Game of Life.

The Digiday Podcast
The Digiday Podcast
Digiday
'Retention has been one of our best stories of the year': Bob Cohn on steering The Economist through the crisis
Bob Cohn joined The Economist Group in February after more than a decade at The Atlantic, where he served on both sides of the fence -- as its digital editor and later as its president. As president and managing director, his stated remit was to grow The Economist's global readership and open up new commercial opportunities in North America. Of course, merely six weeks into the job, the coronavirus pandemic hit. With it came a surge of subscribers as readers looked to the Economist to unpick the impact on the economy, politics, culture and more. "We did see, for a few months back in the spring, new subscribers coming [in] at about twice the rate that we expected," said Cohn on the Digiday podcast. Subscriptions and circulation made up around two-thirds (£204 million;$265 million) of the £326 million ($423 million) The Economist Group generated in revenue in the year to Mar. 31 2020. In recent months, pre-pandemic, the company had already shifted its subscription strategy from focusing on acquisition to more of a retention push. The surge in subscribers during the coronavirus crisis created "a kind of urgency" to keep the newly acquired users. "We were an acquisition machine; we were not focused as diligently as we could on retention," prior to Cohn's arrival, he said. "We came into this year with a determination to be better at that and embrace best practice and go beyond best practice." Some of the new efforts have involved the creation of subscriber-only digital events (some 27,000 subscribers tuned in to watch a Bill Gates interview,) increasing the price of its introductory offers and exclusive subscriber newsletters. The number of subscribers in The Economist's "highly engaged" category increased 21% last year, Cohn said Looking ahead, The Economist plans to roll out a new customer experience platform and create more products at a wider price range to tap a more diversified user base. "Retention has been one of our best stories of the year," Cohn said.
41 min
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Ep 347: The Grape Miniseries -- Viognier
Saved from the brink of extinction just 50 years ago, Viognier (pronounced vee-ohn-yay), is a white grape that's native to the Northern Rhône in France – mainly the areas of Condrieu and Ampuis. The grape produces effusive wines with a strong aromatic character -- peaches, apricots, flowers, herbs, and ginger are common -- and when made well it has a medium body with a touch of acidity and a pleasant bitterness. This week we continue the grape mini-series (maxi series now?) by exploring this comeback kid and the pleasure it can bring when in the right hands. History Viognier's parentage is a bit ambiguous, but it is related to Mondeuse Blanche, which makes it either a half sibling or grandparent of Syrah (as MC Ice points out, we could definitely make a word problem out of this – it’s a brain twister to think about, but possible!). The grape is also tied to Freisa and may be related to Nebbiolo, both which are native to the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. Viognier was once grown pretty widely in the northern Rhône but the combination of the phylloxera outbreak in the mid- and late-19th century, followed by WWI, the Depression, and WWII drove a lot of growers to cities and left vineyards abandoned. By 1965, only about 30 acres (12 hectares) of Viognier vines remained in France, and the variety was nearly extinct. In the mid-1980s, interest started to grow both in France and from winegrowers in Australia and California. Growing interest lead to more plantings and today the grape is grown in Condrieu, Chateau Grillet, and Côte Rôtie in the Northern Rhône, all over the southern Rhône for blends, the Languedoc in southern France, as well as in North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and Spain. Climate and Vineyard * Viognier needs a long, warm growing season to fully ripen, but not so hot it develops excessive levels of sugar before its aromatic notes can develop. Viognier must get ripe to allow flavor to develop and that happens late, often after sugars develop. * Viognier is a small thick-skinned berry with good resistance to rot. It does well on acidic, granite soils. Older vines – more than 30 or 50 years old are best for the grape. * There are at least two clones of Viognier. The older, original one from Condrieu is highly aromatic and tight clustered. The other is healthier, higher yielding and looks and tastes different according to some. This clone, likely made at the University of Montpellier, is widespread in Australia. Winemaking begins in the vineyard – picking decision is vital: * Pick too early and the grape has no flavor, and makes a flat wine. Pick too late the wine is flabby and oily. Must be ripe but not overripe, with lower yields. * Although it is likely best to make the wine in stainless or neutral oak with perhaps some skin contact for a few hours before fermenting, the barrel fermentations, malolactic fermentations, and aging on lees can squash the unique flavor and scent of Viognier. Flavors and Styles * Viognier is like peach, apricot, clementine, honeysuckle, chamomile, jasmine, thyme, pine, spice, ginger, crème fraiche, and honey with a full body and can be oily, or sometimes a bit bitter. It is low in acidity. When aged in oak it tastes like vanilla bean and with malolactic fermentation it is creamy and custard-like. It is almost always high in alcohol, with 14.5% ABV being common. The best Viognier from France often doesn’t age, and even loses aromas after a few years in the bottle. Some of the styles from Australia and the US, which have been aged in oak, last a few more years. * The grape is often bottled as a single variety but can be blended with Roussanne, Marsanne, and Grenache Blanc. * We didn’t mention this in the show, but the wine can be off-dry or even late harvest and sweet. Condrieu and Château-Grillet produce sweet wines in warmer years. Regions... France Northern Rhône: Viognier is grown as single variety in Rhône appellations Condrieu and Château Grillet on right (west) bank of Rhône River. In Côte Rôtie, winemakers can include up to 20% of Viognier though most growers add no more than 5%. Condrieu * Includes seven communes along 14 miles, and makes wines that are usually dry, delicious young, and very aromatic wit structure. The area includes steep hillside vineyards, that face south-southeast to maximize morning sun, not hot evening sun. The soils are granite with a deep sandy topsoil called arzelle. This soil makes the best wine. Yields must be low, and picking must be after the grape has full aromatics. * Top producers: Guigal, Rostaing, Delas, Pierre Gaillard, Vernay, Francois Villard Chateau Grillet * This appellation is owned by one producer, it is a monopole. It is just 7.6 acres/3.08 ha on granite soil with mica – making the wines higher in acid. Vines are 80+ years old and although the area seems ideal, there have been problems with wine quality. Recently the owner of Château Latour of Bordeaux acquired the monopole; there’s hope for restoration of its former glory. Côte Rôtie * We did a whole podcast on this area, but north of Condrieu is Côte Rôtie, a Syrah appellation that can include up to 20% Viognier in the wine (in reality it’s more like 5%). Viognier helps darken the color of the Syrah in co-pigmentation but it takes up valuable real estate so it’s not used as much as it could be. Other French areas: The southern Rhône, where it is blended, the Languedoc and Ardeche, where it makes serviceable Vins de Pays varietal or blended wines. Other Europe: Switzerland, Austria, Italy New World Australia * Yalumba was the pioneer producer in South Australia’s Eden Valley in 1979. The Virgilius is their top wine (aged in oak). * McLaren Vale, Barossa, Adelaide Hills, Heathcote, Geelong, Central Victoria, and more grow the grape, which is a challenge to growers because it stays flavorless for much of the growing season and then transforms into something delicious – patience is a virtue! * One of the best uses for Viognier in Australia is its blends with Shiraz: * Clonakilla (Canberra), Yering Station (Yarra), Torbreck (Barossa) United States California * Viognier came in 1980s to California when John Alban (Alban Vineyards in Edna Valley), Josh Jensen of Calera (Central Coast), and Joseph Phelps (Napa), brought it into the United States in small quantities. The plantings and interest grew as a group of producers dedicated to growing Rhône varieties, called the Rhône Rangers, grew in numbers and popularity. Today California has more than 3,000 acres of Viognier. * Yields are high compared to France, the wines can often be overblown if grown in too-hot weather but the greatest examples are full-bodied and rich. * Top Producers: Tablas Creek, Crux, Qupé, Alban, Calera, Kunde Virginia * Viognier is a signature grape of Virginia because the thick skins of the grape work well in the humidity and the diurnals of the mountains mean Viognier can ripen but maintain acidity over a long growing season. The typical VA Viognier has great fruit, slight bitterness, medium body and good acidity. * Top producers: Barboursville, King Family, Horton * Other US: Oregon, Washington (we mention ABEJA), Texas * Around the World: New Zealand, South Africa, South America (Argentina has a lot, Chile some – all young plantings) Food: The wine is great with dishes that have rosemary, thyme, saffron, and creamy sauces. Expect to spend more than $50 a bottle for good Viognier (we had the 2017 version of the Guigal below. It was US$50). ___________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Thanks to YOU! The podcast supporters on Patreon, who are helping us to make the podcast possible and who we give goodies in return for their help! Check it out today: https://www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople And to sign up f…
43 min
McKinsey Recruiting
McKinsey Recruiting
McKinsey & Company Recruiting
Ellis on GLAM, McKinsey's LGBTQ+ network
What is the purpose of the McKinsey’s LGBTQ+ network GLAM? How does McKinsey introduce inclusion into the workplace and how can someone show support for LGBTQ+ colleagues? Tune in and find answers to these questions and more in our latest McKinsey Recruiting Podcast episode, with Ellis Griffith. Ellis Griffith is McKinsey’s people function leader for the Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa region, based in our Amsterdam office. Ellis is a thought leader in the areas of culture and diversity as well as learning, HR and organization development. # In 2019 Ellis moved from Atlanta to Amsterdam with her partner Meredith and four children. # When Ellis was a child, she moved from a small town in the US to Japan. She speaks Japanese fluently and majored in Asian languages and religion. # Within her learning program on conscious inclusion, Ellis visited 50+ McKinsey locations and shares her impressions of differences and similarities of our offices worldwide. # Ellis provides helpful insights for LGBTQ+ colleagues on how to navigate challenges in the (consulting) work environment. She also explains the purpose of McKinsey’s GLAM network. # In our “Ask me anything” section, Ellis explains the many ways to support the LGBTQ+ community as an ally. She also describes McKinsey’s recruiting process. For more information on our podcast, visit: http://mckinsey.com/recruitingpodcast Read more >    Listen to the podcast (duration: 37:06) >
37 min
Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki
Kara Goldin: Founder and CEO of Hint, Author of Undaunted
This episode’s guest is Kara Goldin. She is the founder, CEO, and chief taster of Hint, the lifestyle company that sells bottled water and hand sanitizers Prior to Hint, she has worked for are AOL, CNN, and Time. And, well, technically, the TeePee restaurant in Arizona. She is a graduate of Arizona State University. The episode starts with a story about an executive from a large beverage company in Atlanta addressing her as “sweetie” and how that was a pivotal moment in her undaunted quest to start a company that sold bottled water. Today Hint is over fifteen years old and sales exceed $150 million. It gone from employing Kara and her husband to over employs 200 people. In this episode we discussed: 🍊 what it takes to make a cold call 🍎 get your products into Whole Foods 🍋 and, in general, how to be undaunted This episode is brought to you by reMarkable, the paper tablet. It's my favorite way to take notes, sign contracts, and save all the instruction manuals to all the gadgets I buy. Learn more at remarkable.com I hope you enjoyed this podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes It takes less than sixty seconds, and it really makes a difference in swaying new listeners and upcoming guests. I might read your review on my next episode! Sign up for Guy's weekly email at http://eepurl.com/gL7pvD Connect with Guy on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/guykawasaki Instagram: instagram.com/guykawasaki Facebook: facebook.com/guy LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/ Read Guy’s books: https://guykawasaki.com/books/ Thank you for listening and sharing this episode with your community.
55 min
City of the Future
City of the Future
Sidewalk Labs
Generative Design
Generative design is the process of automatically producing thousands of designs based on goals and constraints you feed into a computer. In this episode, we ask: could you apply generative design to something as complex as the urban planning process? Could it reveal better designs for buildings, neighborhoods, districts — showing us options we didn’t even know were possible? And, in the future, could this new emerging field even empower urban development teams to create better, more human cities? In this episode: * [0:06 - 4:13] Hosts Vanessa Quirk and Eric Jaffe on the unintended consequences of the 1915 Equitable Building (the “monstrosity” that influenced New York City’s first zoning laws) * [4:15 - 11:42] Sidewalk Labs’ Senior Product Manager Violet Whitney and Senior Design Lead Brian Ho on Delve, a product that uses generative design to reveal unexplored urban design options for any given development project * [11:43 - 18:13] Carnegie Mellon University’s Associate Professor of Ethics & Computational Technologies Molly Wright Steenson on the history of architecture and computing — and the contributions of thinkers like Cedric Price, Christopher Alexander, and the MIT Architecture Machine Group * [18:14 - 20:16] Geographer and City Planner Evan Lowry on how visualization software could transform community engagement in Charlotte, North Carolina * [20:19 - 22:42] Violet and Brian return to explain why it’s important for cities to visualize how urban designs could impact their communities. To see images and videos of topics discussed in this episode, read the link-rich transcript on our Sidewalk Talk Medium page. City of the Future is hosted by Eric Jaffe and Vanessa Quirk, and produced by Benjamen Walker and Andrew Callaway. Mix is by Zach Mcnees. Art is by Tim Kau. Our music is composed by Adaam James Levin-Areddy of Lost Amsterdam. Special thanks to Violet Whitney, Brian Ho, Molly Wright Steenson, and Evan Lowry.
24 min
The Straits Times Audio Features
The Straits Times Audio Features
The Straits Times and The Business Times
Over $5.5B to be paid out under Jobs Support Scheme from Oct 29: The Big Story Ep 48
The Big Story Ep 48: Over $5.5B to be paid out under Jobs Support Scheme from Oct 29 8:56 mins Synopsis: This is a special episode of The Straits Times' video series The Big Story. Over $5.5 billion under the Jobs Support Scheme will be paid out to more than 140,000 employers from Oct 29, to help them retain their workers amid the Covid-19 pandemic. With this latest round of payouts, the total amount disbursed under the scheme will exceed $21.5 billion. The Big Story hosts Hairianto Diman and Olivia Quay speak with the CEO of the Singapore Business Federation Ho Meng Kit as he weighs in on the extent to which the scheme has helped businesses. Read the story: https://str.sg/J6Y8 Produced and edited by: ST Video team and Muhammad Firmann Discover The Straits Times Videos: https://str.sg/JPrc Discover ST & BT podcasts: Channel: https://str.sg/JWVR Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2PwZCYU Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Lu4rPP Google podcasts: http://str.sg/googlestbt Websites: http://str.sg/stbtpodcasts https://bt.sg/moneyhacks Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  --- Discover more niche podcast series by ST and BT below: Follow Money Hacks Podcast on: http://bt.sg/btmoneyhacks Follow Health Check Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWaN Follow Asian Insider Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWa7 Follow Green Pulse Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWaf Follow Life Picks Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWa2 Follow #PopVultures Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWad Follow Bookmark This! Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWas Follow #GameOfTwoHalves Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWRE Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu