AdExchanger
AdExchanger
Apr 14, 2020
Social Distancing With Friends: Bob Liodice
Play • 25 min

Bob Liodice, president and CEO of the Association of National Advertisers, is at his computer by 6 a.m. every morning until nearly 7 p.m. every night talking to CMOs as they try to navigate the coronavirus craziness together. Evenings you can find him with his family on Long Island rediscovering the joy of board games. New favorite: The Game of Life.

Marketing Today with Alan Hart
Marketing Today with Alan Hart
Alan B. Hart
Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale
On this 243rd episode of "Marketing Today," host Alan Hart speaks with Esperanza Teasdale, vice president and general manager of the Hispanic Business Unit for Pepsico Beverages North America. Teasdale is responsible for the overall strategy, engagement, and sales for a Hispanic business unit that brings in over $2 billion per year. We start our conversation with Teasdale's experience from growing up with two parents that had both immigrated to the US from Ecuador in search of a better life. Since they both had demanding blue-collar jobs, Teasdale "grew up as a latch key kid," taking herself to and from school as a child, essentially responsible for herself. Teasdale then discusses her engineering education, spending time in manufacturing environments after graduation until attaining her MBA and ultimately moving onto sales. Once Teasdale realized that the sales sector wasn't for her, she moved to marketing. We then dive into the Hispanic business unit and the "untapped potential" that led to its creation. Now and into the future, Teasdale and her team are focused on multicultural marketing, as "everything we do should be multicultural because that is the fabric of our country." Teasdale takes us through the helping hands she received throughout her career as a result of her willingness to be vulnerable. "You don't have to wait for someone to ask you to take a seat; you can take it yourself." Lastly, we discuss the opportunity that marketers have today to think differently about their previously rejected ideas because "the world today is different than it was before!"   Highlights from this week's "Marketing Today": As the daughter of immigrants, Esperanza greatly appreciates the sacrifices that her parents made to have a better life. 1:37 Esperanza's parents came from the hot ecosystem of Ecuador to the cold winter in the US. 2:30 Equality is something that everyone is trying to achieve in today's world, especially with all that has gone on this year. 3:22 There were times when Esperanza's parents were injured or sick, and no money came in the door. 3:54 After studying engineering in her undergrad in college, Esperanza spent quite a bit of time in a manufacturing environment. 6:58 Esperanza's company paid for her MBA, after which she had her choice of path, ultimately choosing marketing. 7:48 The Hispanic Business Unit at PepsiCo was created to tap into the previously untapped Hispanic sector. 10:36 Multicultural marketing has gone through a revolution that parallels the makeup of our country. 12:29 There is no one-size-fits-all in the melting pot that is the US, even within each culture. 13:13 P&G has shown to be a champion of diversity and inclusion by driving cultural relevance through its advertising. 16:03 Heading into the future, we need to be more culturally relevant, and the Hispanic Unit is an example of what the marketing industry should look like. 19:10 The chaos and uncertainty of 2020 caused PepsiCo to pause during the initial breakout of COVID. 22:10 Esperanza and her team made sure to study the effects of COVID on the habits of Hispanic consumers. 22:50 The Hispanic population has shown resilience in its journey to get to the US and this helped maintain optimism in the face of chaos. 24:37 To promote passionate multicultural youth's ability to vote, PepsiCo launched its Unmute Your Voice Campaign. 26:12 Esperanza's team is focused on leaning into the communities that need the most help as it enters 2021. 28:06 2020 has shown Americans to be empathetic, looking for ways to help however they can. 29:30 PepsiCo finds itself in so many households in the US that the decision to make a bold message brings a lot of risk. 32:41 Esperanza takes responsibility in her role as a Latina executive to bring others along to change their paths for the better. 35:06 The ability to show up, take action without someone asking, and put yourself out there will bring the greatest rewards. 38:30 Throughout her career, Esperanza has received advice and help from high-level executives to be successful. 39:15 The experience of losing both of her parents, while devastating, taught Esperanza a lot about herself and her family history. 42:10 Esperanza feels a responsibility to be empathetic to the motivations behind the actions of the people around her. 44:15 Looking back, Esperanza would encourage herself to take the offered hands of anyone that had done her wrong. 46:01 The Mastercard Initiative created a card that allowed anyone that is transgender to have their true identity on the card. 48:35 For those marketers with a fixed mindset, current times offer the opportunity to think about things differently. 50:52   Resources Mentioned: Ecuador Latchkey kid P&G's Marc Pritchard Marc Pritchard's work to drive diversity (Adweek) Marc Pritchard from P&G on Marketing Today Pepsi Unmute Your Voice Campaign Scott Finlow from PepsiCo on Marketing Today Growth mindset Orange Theory Arm Band Mastercard Card for LBTQIA+   Subscribe to the podcast: Listen in iTunes (link: http://apple.co/2dbdAhV) Listen in Google Podcasts (link: http://bit.ly/2Rc2kVa) Listen in Spotify (Link: http://spoti.fi/2mCUGnC ) Connect with the Guest: https://www.linkedin.com/in/esperanza-teasdale-a867225/ https://twitter.com/espyt https://twitter.com/PepsiCo Connect with Marketing Today and Alan Hart: http://twitter.com/abhart https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanhart http://twitter.com/themktgtoday https://www.facebook.com/themktgtoday/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketing-today-with-alan-hart/   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/marketingtoday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
54 min
In Depth
In Depth
First Round
Plaid & Dropbox’s Jean-Denis Grèze’s playbook for building an engineering culture of ownership
Today’s episode is with Jean-Denis Grèze, Head of Engineering at Plaid, which securely connects your bank to your apps. Before joining Plaid, Jean-Denis served as Director of Engineering at Dropbox, and even had a stint in law school and one year as a lawyer under his belt before diving deep into the world of CS. While he says becoming a lawyer was a “four-year detour he probably didn’t need,” there’s a lot to be said for how it’s shaped his engineering career and management philosophy. As he puts it, he strongly favors pragmatism over perfection, and it’s something he hammers home within his engineering teams. In today’s conversation, Jean-Denis pulls on threads from across his career to weave together a modern playbook for engineering leadership — and the hard-won lessons that stick with him. He also shares his insights on why his engineering org doesn’t have titles, the one question he asks every engineering manager candidate, and how his team prioritizes technical debt and keeping the lights on versus sexy, brand-new projects. Today’s conversation is a must-listen for technical leaders or those who are eyeing the engineering leadership track. From motivating a team to tracking the right KPIs, Jean-Denis has got tons of great tactics and stories from his time at Plaid and Dropbox for you to learn from. You can email us questions directly at review@firstround.com or follow us on Twitter @twitter.com/firstround and @twitter.com/brettberson
57 min
Wharton FinTech Podcast
Wharton FinTech Podcast
Wharton Fintech Podcast
Sam Bobley, Co-Founder and CEO of Ocrolus - Transforming Documents into Data Analytics
Miguel Armaza sits down with Sam Bobley, Co-Founder and CEO of Ocrolus, an infrastructure company that transforms documents into data analytics with incredible accuracy designed to help financial services companies make high quality decisions at unprecedented speed. Sam started building Ocrolus in his parent’s kitchen when he was only 22 and seven years later, the company employs nearly 1,000 people globally and has raised close to $50 million in equity from top VC funds, including Stage 2 Capital, QED, Fintech Collective, Oak HC/FT, and Bullpen Capital. We talked about: - Company origins - Sam’s entrepreneurial journey - Strategies on building and hiring the initial team - Finding product-market fit and how he decided to shift and expand his client base - The fast-changing and fast-moving fintech ecosystem - Entrepreneurial advice - And a whole lot more Sam Bobley Sam started building Ocrolus in his parent’s kitchen when he was 22-years-old. Six years later, the company employs nearly 1,000 people globally, spread across four offices. As Ocrolus matured, Sam authored a patent application and helped raise more than $30 million in venture capital. He was named to Forbes 30 Under 30 in Finance, Class of 2020. About Ocrolus Ocrolus is a human-in-the-loop infrastructure company that transforms documents into data analytics with over 99% accuracy. Ocrolus technology is designed to help financial services companies make high quality decisions with trusted data and unprecedented speed. Inc. Magazine recognized Ocrolus as the #1 fastest-growing fintech nationwide, and the #1 fastest-growing software company in NY. Visit ocrolus.com to learn more.
32 min
Acquired
Acquired
Ben Gilbert and David Rosenthal
Bitcoin
We had to do it. After 12 years and 3,000,000x appreciation, we kick off Season 8 with the best investment of all-time and our biggest episode ever: Bitcoin. From the first bitcoin transaction of 10k for two Papa John's pizzas (worth about $350m today!!) to $40k+ BTC and maybe the moon beyond, we cover the whole crazy, improbable journey of how a single 8-page PDF document changed the world of money — and perhaps the world itself — forever. If you love Acquired and want more, join our LP Community for access to over 50 LP-only episodes, monthly Zoom calls, and live access for big events like emergency pods and book club discussions with authors. We can't wait to see you there. Join here at: https://acquired.fm/lp/ Sponsors: * Thanks to Tiny for being our presenting sponsor for all of Acquired Season 8. Tiny is building the "Berkshire Hathaway of the internet" — if you own a wonderful internet business that you want to sell, or know someone who does, you should get in touch with them. Unlike traditional buyers, they commit to quick, simple diligence, a 30-day or less process, and will leave your business to do its thing for the long term. You can learn more about Tiny here: http://bit.ly/acquiredtiny * Thank you as well to Vouch and to Capchase. You can learn more about them at: * https://bit.ly/acquired-vouch * http://bit.ly/acquiredcapchase The Bitcoin Playbook: (also available on our website at https://www.acquired.fm/episodes/bitcoin ) 1. Technological paradigm shifts are ideal opportunities for attacking incumbents. * The traditional finance system worked fantastically well for 500 years, but it wasn't built for the internet. The fact that sharing your bank account or credit card number is required in order to transact, but there's no really robust way to protect against fraud when doing so, provided the perfect seam for a new entrant. Bitcoin and its creators saw this shortcoming and created a new form of money that worked like email. 2. In the early days of a network-effect system, usage matters more than use-cases. * Because the value of a network grows as a function of Metcalfe's Law (value = # of engaged participants squared), in the early days simply growing the number of engaged participants matters more than the specifics of what those participants are actually doing. As the network's value grows, it will become attractive to successively more groups of users and use cases. * Bitcoin started as the domain of researchers and fringe libertarians, then illicit transactions (Silk Road), then speculation (the ICO boom) before finally reaching adoption by the mainstream investment community. Each wave built enough monetary value in the network to make it attractive to the next set of users. Similarly Facebook went from sharing photos of attractive undergrads to how billions communicate, and Airbnb went from ratty airbeds to ~10x larger than any hotel chain, all within a few short years. 3. Distributing network value out to its participants creates large incentives for adoption. * Rewarding miners with bitcoin itself created a huge incentive for participants to join and stay in the Bitcoin network. Although this dynamic got a bad rap during the ICO bubble when it was overused and overpromised by grifters and scammers, it remains a powerful strategy and will likely be used more going forward. * Perhaps most excitingly, this incentive unlocks massive new potential for open-source software development: people who work on open-source software (or provide other functions) can now receive direct value for their contributions, without being employed in any traditional sense. 4. Just HODL, baby. (aka let your winners run) * You can get rich quickly by getting in early on a winning investment. But you can only get really rich by holding a compounding asset for an extended period of time. Sequoia learned this lesson painfully with its Apple investment in the 1970's: selling its entire position for just a ~$6m profit within a few years. Similarly, anyone who bought 1,000 bitcoin for $10 a piece in 2012 could have sold them for $1m four years later in 2016. But four years on from that, they're now worth $35 million. If you continue to believe Bitcoin has a bright longterm future (which, to be fair, you may not!), what could they be worth in 2024? 5. We're only just realizing the implications of digital scarcity. * For its entire existence before Bitcoin, computing and the internet was all about turning scarcity into abundance. (via infinitely replicable + easily distributable software and other digital goods) For the first time in history, Bitcoin and its underlying blockchain have introduced the opposite: scarce, non-replicable digital assets. Native digital currency (Bitcoin) and smart contracts (Ethereum) are the first big outcomes of this advancement, but there may be many more seismic shifts to come. Links: * Satoshi's Whitepaper: https://www.bitcoin.com/bitcoin.pdf * Matt Huang's "Bitcoin for the Open-Minded Skeptic": https://www.paradigm.xyz/Bitcoin_For_The_Open_Minded_Skeptic.pdf * Nellie Bowles's "Everyone Is Getting Hilariously Rich and You’re Not": https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/13/style/bitcoin-millionaires.html * Square’s $50m investment in BTC: https://images.ctfassets.net/2d5q1td6cyxq/5sXNrlEh2mEnTvvhgtYOm2/737bcfdc15e2a1c3cbd9b9451710ce54/Square_Inc._Bitcoin_Investment_Whitepaper.pdf Episode Sources: * Full list of episode sources available here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16QCDNm2qzG3Bn5h1j1KXisxL_JGT7egDx7czX9ThHLY/edit?usp=sharing
3 hr 12 min
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Kurt Nelson, PhD and Tim Houlihan
How Chaning Jang Works Around Not Being WEIRD
Chaning Jang is the CSO of the Busara Center for Behavioral Economics and has helped lead the organization since 2013. He is responsible for strategy, and a portfolio of projects, primarily focused on research. Prior to joining Busara, Chaning worked as an English teacher in the Czech Republic and an equities trader in Los Angeles. Chaning completed a Postdoc at Princeton University in Psychology and Public Affairs, holds a PhD in Economics from the University of Hawai'i with specialization in Behavioral Economics and Development, and a bachelor's in Managerial Economics from the University of California, Davis. He is also a CFA level II holder. We spoke to Chaning one night (for him) from his office in Nairobi, Kenya and we focused our discussion on context and how so much of psychological research has been focused in WEIRD countries (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic). Because of this focus and how behavior can be linked to cultural and social norms, countries that are not WEIRD are often unable to successfully apply the research that was executed in WEIRD cultures. Chaning is trying to change that. The work that the Busara Center is doing is important on many levels, the most significant is trying to eliminate poverty at the heart of where it is the worst on earth: Africa. Chaning’s work is fascinating, his ideas sparkle with intensity, and his comments are inspiring. We hope you enjoy our conversation with Chaning Jang. We are grateful to Allison Zelkowitz from Save the Children for connecting us. Links Chaning Jang, PhD: https://www.busaracenter.org/staff-bios?tag=Chaning%20Jang Busara Center for Behavioral Economics: https://www.busaracenter.org/ Dan Ariely, PhD: https://danariely.com/ WEIRD: https://www2.psych.ubc.ca/~henrich/pdfs/WeirdPeople.pdf Johannes Haushofer, PhD: https://www.tedmed.com/speakers/show?id=621210 Kahneman & Tversky: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kahneman The Linda Problem (Conjunction Fallacy): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjunction_fallacy Jeremy Shapiro, PhD: https://www.poverty-action.org/people/jeremy-shapiro Economic and psychological effects of health insurance and cash transfers: Evidence from a randomized experiment in Kenya: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0304387818310289 Trier Social Stress Test: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trier_social_stress_test Cold Pressor Test: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_pressor_test Kevin Parker: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Parker_(musician) Poverty Decreases IQ: https://scholar.harvard.edu/files/sendhil/files/976.full_.pdf Musical Links Tame Impala (Australian psych-rock): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C24hUt18RWY John Lennon “Instant Karma”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfBPbFEel5k Daft Punk with Pharrell Williams “Get Lucky”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkeIwhKIi84 Fleetwood Mac “The Chain”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O6P2_i0Y6ms Joji “Your Man”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrtkU7i0qD8 Fleet Foxes “Can I Believe You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L2E2DpWO3-Y Freddie Mercury “I’m The Great Pretender”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLRjFWDGs1g © 2021 Behavioral Grooves
1 hr 15 min
North Star Podcast
North Star Podcast
David Perell
Trevor Bauer: Playing Professional Baseball
My guest today is Trevor Bauer, who is arguably the very best pitcher in Major League Baseball. In 2020, he had the lowest Earned Run Average of any pitcher and won the National League Cy Young Award, which goes to the top pitcher in the game. I wanted to interview Trevor not only because he's an excellent pitcher, but because he takes a radical approach to the game. He's a physicist and a scientist. A scholar and an entrepreneur. And you don't find that combination very often. Furthermore, he might be the most polarizing figure in baseball. Some people love him; some people hate him. But every fan has an opinion on him. Off the field, he's the founder of Momentum, athlete-driven media company that uses storytelling to connect athletes and fans. To build it, he started a podcast and a YouTube vlog where he talks about pitching mechanics and what it's like to play professional baseball. Personally, this was one of the coolest episodes I've ever recorded. I grew up as an avid San Francisco Giants fan, and I still remember getting to the field early to get autographs and catch baseballs during batting practice. This interview would have made little 8-year old David proud, and I'm lucky to share it with you today. Please enjoy my conversation with Trevor Bauer. ____________________________ Show Notes 2:18 - How Trevor would change the way baseball is marketed and to whom it should be pitched. 5:45 - Why updating the game for a modern audience would be difficult, despite what Trevor believes would be a successful move. 11:23 - Why there aren't many unique fields like in San Francisco or Boston. 15:10 - How baseball is not being evangelized well by the people who could be doing it most easily. 19:51 - How general scientific literacy can and should be improved through sports. 23:28 - What it takes for Trevor to scientifically design his pitches and then implement them in a game. 31:00 - The business of baseball, and how Trevor has learned to maneuver its quirks and difficulties. 37:13 - If could choose anybody, who else in the sports world and beyond Trevor would want to talk to. 42:15 - How Trevor looks into the future to superpower his game. 48:07 - The dangers of getting too in-depth in analyzing your game, and how it can hurt you. 54:43 - Why you should practice analytically and perform intuitively. 56:13 - What breathing techniques Trevor employs in his game. 58:18 - The different aspects of building a business and how Trevor is handling each element differently. 1:07:30 - Why Trevor's actual goals in his work and his game aren't covered by the media. 1:10:44 - How his father helped Trevor succeed in baseball by giving him the tools he needed to work hard.
1 hr 14 min
The NFX Podcast
The NFX Podcast
NFX, Jed Kolko, Twilio, Pete Flint., Jeff Lawson, Dave Packard, HP
The Founders’ List: The Bitcoin White Paper by Satoshi Nakamoto
This is The Founders' List - audio versions of essays from technology’s most important leaders, selected by the founder community. Originally written under the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto, Bitcoin’s original white paper titled 'Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System' was released over 12 years ago. Considered the most seminal piece of work in the cryptocurrency movement, the Bitcoin White Paper outlines blockchain technology and the entire decentralized revolution. The content of this 9-page document incited what can only be described as a revolution in the world of fintech. More relevantly, Bitcoin’s white paper laid out an inspiring new definition of money at a time when faith in the traditional financial system was still being salvaged. Satoshi launched the first Bitcoin client in early 2009 and then handed the project off to the community in 2010, where it has since thrived as the open-source of study, work, and fascination for millions across the globe. Today we bring this infamous memo to The Founders' List so you have a chance to listen to his original outline of such a world-changing idea. Examining the white paper origins is a great exercise in understanding why Bitcoin has the influence it has in today's world. Satoshi Nakamoto’s blueprint is the official “birth certificate” of Bitcoin. Read the white paper here - https://bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf
14 min
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