AdExchanger
AdExchanger
Oct 26, 2020
Fifty-Five’s Hugo Loriot On Why Advertisers Need To Speak Up As The Cookie Crumbles
37 min

Hugo Loriot, a partner at You & Mr Jones-owned data agency fifty-five, weighs in on the unfortunate lack of participation from the buy side in the cookie debates, the growing role of clean rooms and why Ads Data Hub probably doesn’t pose an antitrust concern for Google.

Design Better Podcast
Design Better Podcast
InVisionApp, Inc
Author Bill Burnett: Designing Your Work Life
In the wake of a worldwide pandemic and economic catastrophe, many of our friends and colleagues in the world of digital product design are fortunate to have kept their jobs, but there have also been many who were not so lucky. We thought it would be timely to bring in an expert who has been using a designer’s mindset to help people reframe their approach to their careers. Bill Burnett, co-author of the bestselling book Designing Your Life, has written a new book called Designing Your Work Life. Bill has been the executive director of the design program at Stanford for 13 years and has also taught one of the most popular elective classes there (which his first book was named from). He and his co-author Dave Evans have taken what they have learned from teaching and running workshops for adults in the midst of a career or life transition to come up with a framework for using tools like curiosity, reframing, radical collaboration, and a bias to action to transform your work life and find the best job for you. In this interview, we speak with Bill about how adopting a designer’s mindset can help you through your current challenges if you’re searching for work. We also chat about how grit and perseverance maps to happiness at work, and how setting aside time for reflection can help you understand what changes you need to make to find a better job (which may even be in your current company). Takeaways: * How setting micro-goals can help you achieve positive change at work. * Why you might think about redesigning and iterating on your role at your current company if you’re unhappy. * What the idea of “generative quitting” is, and why asking the question “What am I doing wrong?” might be a good idea before you decide to quit. Bio Bill Burnett is the co-author of the NYT Best-seller Designing Your Life. He’s also co-director of the Life Design Lab at Stanford University. He’s a designer, educator, and an Adjunct Professor at Stanford University. He’s also the Executive Director of the Design Program where he manages the undergraduate and graduate degree-granting programs and advises 70 -100 students annually.
1 hr 1 min
Design Thinking 101
Design Thinking 101
Dawan Stanford
Teams, Sprints, Prototyping, and Better Meetings with Douglas Ferguson — DT101 E59
Douglas Ferguson is the founder of Voltage Control, a workshop agency on a mission to rid the world of horrible meetings. We talk about teams, design sprints, prototyping, and creating meetings that matter. Show Summary As a coder during the 90s tech bubble, Douglas discovered that he loved working as part cross-functional teams often found in startup companies, and wearing different hats as needed during a project. When the Agile Manifesto came out in early 2001, Douglas realized that a lot of its principles were things he and his teams had already been doing. He began combining Agile and Lean methodologies to find ways teams can work together better. Douglas’ company, Voltage Control, focuses on helping teams learn how to better collaborate. During our conversation, we talk about the hallmarks of a well-functioning team, Douglas’ work with organizations using design sprints and prototyping, and how Douglas’ new book, Magical Meetings, is helping us all be able to have better, more meaningful and productive meetings. Listen in to learn more about: * The traits of a well-functioning team * How prototyping can help an organization * The ins and outs of design sprints * The two questions to ask when designing the test for a prototype * Douglas’ new book, Magical Meetings * How to have better meetings, no matter what industry you’re in * Adapting to the new virtual meeting space Our Guest’s Bio Douglas is an entrepreneur and human-centered technologist with over 20 years of experience. He is president of Voltage Control, an Austin-based workshop agency that specializes in Design Sprints and innovation workshops. Prior to Voltage Control, Douglas held CTO positions at numerous Austin startups, where he led product and engineering teams using agile, lean, and human-centered design principles. While CTO at Twyla, Douglas worked directly with Google Ventures running Design Sprints and now brings this experience and process to companies everywhere. Show Highlights [01:36] Douglas talks about how he got into design and his focus on teams and teamwork. [03:57] Launching Voltage Control to help teams work better together. [04:30] How a well-functioning team evolves. [05:05] The importance of trust between team members. [05:36] Douglas connects the Gallup’s Q12 survey to team trust. [08:06] How Douglas introduces teams to prototyping. [08:51] Creating a vision document of how the team might use prototyping. [09:23] Why Douglas needs to understand the shared values of a team. [11:01] Two tactics Douglas uses to help teams come to a shared understanding. [14:30] Douglas defines prototyping. [14:43] Douglas shares one of his favorite examples of prototyping: the five pound weight. [17:16] Prototypes help teams separate the problem space from the solution space. [18:50] How Douglas facilitates team prototyping. [19:41] The two components of a design sprint. [20:10] The importance of the question “What is the test we need to run?” when designing a prototype. [20:30] The Riskiest Assumption Test (RAT). [22:00] The two questions Douglas asks after deciding on the prototype test. [22:57] Setting expectations for a design sprint and avoiding the “design sprint slump.” [23:44] A design sprint is only the beginning of the work. [24:30] Why it’s important for an organization’s leadership to understand what design sprints can and can’t do. [25:00] Prototyping is intended to give insights and understanding of the problem space to provide direction for the work to come. [26:55] Leadership must understand there is more work to do after the design sprint. [28:49] Design sprints as design research. [29:46] Douglas talks about “branding” the design sprint. [31:11] How Douglas is gathering facilitation techniques and tools from different industries and applying them to help us all improve our meetings. [33:22] Douglas’ new book, Magical Meetings. [34:03] How meeting participants can help the meeting facilitator. [35:10] Magical Meetings offers action steps and principles anyone can use to improve their meetings. [36:11] Douglas offers his thoughts on remote work and virtual meetings, and COVID-19 is changin his work. [37:53] Advice for those holding virtual workshops and meetings. [38:45] Intentionally designing virtual experiences. [40:35] Two virtual tools Douglas recommends for those creating online experiences. [42:21] Where to find out more about Douglas and his work. Links Douglas on LinkedIn Douglas on The Future Shapers Douglas' posts on Medium What is design thinking? Bringing Design Thinking into Technology Voltage Control Beyond the Prototype Inside Innovation - Inside Outside podcast with Douglas Beyond the Prototype - Techblog Writer UK podcast episode with Douglas Gallup’s Q12 Survey Loom screencasting tool Session Lab workshop planning tool Other Design Thinking 101 Episodes You Might Like Stakeholder-Centered Design, Design Thinking in Large Organizations, and Critique for Design Teams with Jean-Louis Racine — DT01 E3 Teaching Yourself Design Thinking + Innovating in Government with Amy J. Wilson — DT101 E19 Designing Your Team + Teams in Design Education + Coaching Design Teams with Mary Sherwin and David Sherwin — DT101 E49 ________________ Thank you for listening to the show and looking at the show notes. Send your questions, suggestions, and guest ideas to Dawan and the Fluid Hive team. Cheers ~ Dawan Fluid Hive’s Ask Like a Designer — Monthly articles with design ideas, methods, frameworks, templates, and a question-fueled approach to design-driven innovation. Discover new ways to learn, lead and apply design-driven innovation. Free Download — Design Driven Innovation: Avoid Innovation Traps with These 9 Steps Innovation Smart Start Webinar — Take your innovation projects from frantic to focused!
44 min
Below the Line with James Beshara
Below the Line with James Beshara
James Beshara
Airbnb IPO with Lenny Rachitsky and Marc McCabe
https://bit.ly/Dive_further_BelowtheLine "The most exciting new podcast in the startup world.” - Eric Ries, Founder, and NYTimes bestselling author James is joined by fellow former Airbnb Execs Larry Rachitski and Marc Mccabe for this #deepdive on the impending and highly anticipated Airbnb IPO.  The conversation begins with Lenny, Marc and James sharing their respective journeys that led them to joining the Airbnb team, and the factors that played into that decision. They continue to dissect what each believes are challenges Airbnb faces heading into the IPO, as well as what they believe to be it's strongest leverage points, and ultimately how both play into their forecasts for the company. They close the show deciding how much of a hypothetical $100,000 cash surplus they would invest into the travel juggernaut. Lenny https://twitter.com/lennysan  Marc https://twitter.com/mccabe About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He’s been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine’s “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. You can email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline — “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Straight Up Podcasts LLC.
1 hr 47 min
Marketing Trends
Marketing Trends
Mission
Why Your Inbox is the New Newspaper
For years, your favorite cup of coffee and your daily newspaper have been synonymous with each other. But it turns out that that morning routine is just another thing being disrupted by the digital age. Kerel Cooper, the Senior Vice President of LiveIntent, explains it like this: _“More people are waking up in the morning, grabbing a cup of coffee and opening up their inbox. So gone are the days of opening up your door and there's the newspaper on the front step. It's, it's now your inbox. And I think publishers and brands recognize that.”_ So how can brands take control of a consumer’s inbox? And where should they be focusing those efforts to win open rates? Kerel joined Marketing Trends to discuss why email marketing continues to thrive, why content is more important than ever, and the need for marketers to understand why the death of third-party cookies might be a good thing. Main Takeaways: * Time to Level-Up: Content marketing has never been more important. With more and more people at home, every chance you get to reach a customer must be more creative, and it should center around how you are retaining customers, how you are selling products, and how you are educating the marketplace on your products. * Inbox is the Hot New Thing: Email inboxes have steadily replaced newspapers as consumers’ go-to source for early morning information. Marketers who think email marketing is a thing of the past need to shift their focus to how they are connecting with consumers via newsletters. * Gimme that Cookie: As third-party cookies begin to fade away, marketers must start understanding where they are getting their data and how they are utilizing that data. If you have been heavily reliant on third-party data, you need to shift your focus to gathering your own data. The larger your dataset is from a first-party data perspective, the more in control marketers will be of their own destiny. --- Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world’s number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. To learn more or subscribe to our weekly newsletter, visit MarketingTrends.com.
46 min
The Disruptors
The Disruptors
Matt Ward
Neanderthal King: A Medieval Epic Adventure: Part Seven
Imagine Game of Thrones, but Neanderthals never died off: MORE INFORMATION AT: neanderthalking.com It’s 1107, and the once-great Neanderthal empire is no more, laid waste by the dark Sapien king, Isaac, the same bastard who slaughtered the Thal queen’s young heirs. A brutal reversal of medieval power forged in blood and fueled by Sap ingenuity. But one babe escaped the mad king’s wrath. Raised the son of a simple Thal herder, Maralek’s a rough lad with the ferocious pride and temper of his ruined people, a scorn for rules and rulers, and less than a little creativity in his thick skull. In a word, your average Neanderthal. And life’s livable, until King Isaac resumes his bloodthirsty crusade, and Maralek’s forced into slaving shackles. Then, a rowdy caravan, a mysterious gypsy, a whispered prophecy… A whirlwind of devastation and war as his master is murdered, his fate unwoven, and his world ripped asunder in an epic battle to end all. Neanderthal King is a historic epic YA fantasy by renowned science fiction and fantasy author, Matt Ward, that features savage twists and darker secrets, raging kings and enslaved heirs, and an audaciously ambitious coming of age quest set in an alternative medieval Europe. If you love Brandon Sanderson, Ursula le Guin, or Robin Hobb, or explosive high and low fantasy classics like Lord of the Rings, the Kingkiller Chronicles, and the Earthsea Cycle, you’ll love this heroic historical tale. For more information, to purchase the complete audio adventure or to download the entire technothriller free with a free trial of Audible, visit neanderthalking.com -- Want to follow along with Maralek's adventure? For a limited time, grab your FREE illustrated map of Tharkal and the six kingdoms of Sapdom by visiting mattwardwrites.com/map. -- More information on the author at mattwardwrites.com.
30 min
Me, Myself, and AI
Me, Myself, and AI
MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group
Tech and Ethics: The World Economic Forum’s Kay Firth-Butterfield on Doing the Right Thing in AI
Kay Firth-Butterfield was teaching AI, ethics, law, and international relations when a chance meeting on an airplane landed her a job as chief AI ethics officer. In 2017, Kay became head of AI and machine learning at the World Economic Forum, where her team develops tools and on-the-ground programs to improve AI understanding and governance across the globe. In the final episode of the first season of the Me, Myself, and AI podcast, Kay joins cohosts Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh to discuss the democratization of AI, the values of good governance and ethics in technology, and the importance of having people understand the technology across their organizations — and society. She also weighs in on other themes our hosts have discussed this season, including education, collaboration, and innovation. Your reviews are essential to the success of Me, Myself, and AI. For a limited time, we’re offering a free download of MIT SMR’s best articles on artificial intelligence to listeners who review the show. Send a screenshot of your review to smrfeedback@mit.edu to receive the download. Me, Myself, and AI is a collaborative podcast between MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group, hosted by Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh. Its engineer is David Lishansky, and the coordinating producers are Allison Ryder and Sophie Rüdinger. Guest bio: Kay Firth-Butterfield is head of AI and machine learning and a member of the executive committee of the World Economic Forum. In the United Kingdom, she is a barrister with Doughty Street Chambers and has worked as a mediator, arbitrator, part-time judge, business owner, and professor. She is vice chair of the IEEE Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems and serves on the Polaris Council of the U.S. Government Accountability Office advising on AI.
28 min
Resourceful Designer
Resourceful Designer
Mark Des Cotes
Six Steps To Running A Design Business From Home - RD239
Do you have what it takes to run a design business from home? If there’s one positive takeaway from the 2020 Pandemic, it’s that a lot of people got to experience what it’s like to work from home. Some realized right away that it’s not for them. They need people around them and an office environment to be productive. In contrast, others got a taste of what being a home-based business owner is like. And they like it. But to run a design business from home, full-time, permanently, you need to know what you’re getting into. Some designers think that working from home is an easy life and that once you set up your design business, new clients and projects will just flow in. But it doesn’t work that way. This is not Field Of Dreams. Just building it does not guarantee they will come. Running a successful design business takes more than design skills. For your design business to succeed, you need solid skills in business development, lead generation, marketing, communication, leadership to work with your team, and of course, sales. Being a designer and owning a design business are two completely different things. So how do you make the most of it? How do you set yourself up for success? How do you ensure that you can sustain this lifestyle long term? The answer–you need to plan. How does that saying go? “By failing to prepare, you’re preparing to fail.” So prepare yourself. Because chances are, it’s going to be a rocky start. Step 1: Create an environment you’re comfortable in. The first step in feeling like you’re running a home-based business is to treat your working space as your business office. Having a place in your dwelling where you can transition from home life to business life is key. If you have a separate room that you can designate as your office, all the better. But if that’s not the case, pick a corner and set it up to be your working environment. Get yourself a good office chair and set up your computer so that it’s ergonomically comfortable to work at. Then fill the space with everything you need to work productively. The more your environment feels like your “working space,” the more productive you’ll be. Step 2: Keep your overhead to a minimum. Everyone dreams of making big bucks and living the dream. But that’s not the way you should be thinking. Remember, it’s not how much money you make that’s important, but how much of the money you keep and what you do with that money, especially at the start. Even though a good office chair is important, don’t spend $1000 on one if you don’t have the money to invest yet. Keeping your overhead low is important. You want to keep your expenses to a minimum to benefit more from the money you make designing. A wise man once said you could save 100% of your money by choosing not to buy something. So even though I’m a proponent for things such as lifetime deals. It’s only a deal if you can afford it and if you’re going to get enough use from it to cover the cost of the deal. Especially when you’re just starting, be careful what you spend. Step 3: Work on your business, not in your business. One of the biggest mistakes freelance designers make is focusing all their time and energy on the projects they do for their clients. Yes, you want to give 100% to your clients. But that 100% doesn’t have to mean all of your time. There’s a big difference between working in your business and working on your business. You must make time to work on aspects of your business as well. Like finances, to make sure you’re keeping your overhead low and doing the most with the money you’re earning. Then there are marketing plans to figure out how you’re going to reach out to new clients. There are also processes and systems you need to develop for your business to succeed, like how you will communicate with your clients and your team? How are you going to organize all the assets you acquire? Don’t forget your goals. Goals are your destination. Where you want to be a year, two years, 5 years from now. Without goals, you have no way to measure your success. Just because you’re an office of one, making money from the few clients you have, don’t think you can avoid treating what you do as a business. And for any business to succeed, it needs to evolve with the times. So make time to work on your business, and not just in your business. Step 4: Be proud of your home-based business. Never shy away from the fact that you are working from home. There was a time when working from home was looked down upon. But not anymore. It’s the end of 2020, and if there’s anything this year has taught us, is that working from home is a viable option. It no longer has the negative stigma it once had. In fact, many people will be envious when you say you’re working from home. Take the attitude that you are working from home, not working at home. There’s a difference. You are running a business, just like every brick and mortar business out there. It just so happens that your business is situated in the same location you call home. Step 5: Look the part. Just because you’re working from home is not an excuse to be unprofessional. How you present yourself and your business is vitally important to your success. I’m a T-Shirt and jeans kind of guy, but any time I meet with a client, either in person or virtually, I make sure to dress up, shave and look presentable. If you present yourself as a starving artist, your clients won’t take you seriously. If you need an actual business environment to meet with clients, look into daily office or conference room rentals at local co-working spaces. Looking professional also applies to your visual brand. Your logo, your website, your social media, etc. You’re a designer; I shouldn’t have to tell you the importance a good brand can have on a business. The same applies to you. Step 6: Be honest with yourself. All of this may be well and good, but you have to be honest with yourself before you get too far down this path. Not everyone is suited to working from home. Nobody knows you better than yourself. Do you have the work habits required to do this all alone? Do you have the discipline to work unsupervised and not be distracted by the things around you? Can you remain happy and motivated after doing this for a long time? Are you capable of dealing with the isolation of being alone every day? This last one is important. Isolation can lead to depression, which can lead to poor working habits and bad business decisions. Which, if left unchecked, can result in a failed business. Find something to help with isolation. Join groups and communities to help combat isolation. The Resourceful Designer Community is a great place for this. Or find local groups where you can interact in person. Not only will these activities aid your social mindset, but they can also enhance your business and quality of life significantly. Think about it before you try it. So there you have it, six steps to running a business from home. If you’ve already taken the plunge and are currently running a home-based design business, make sure you have everything in place to ensure your success. Remember, A goal without a plan is just a wish. And the last time I checked, wishes don’t put food on the table. How much thought have you given to working from home? Let me know by leaving a comment for this episode. Tip of the week Chrome Application Shortcuts A convenient way to turn a website into a desktop application is by using Chrome Applications Shortcuts. This is especially useful for browser-based tools such as invoicing/bookkeeping and Customer and Project Management Software. Instead of searching through dozens of open browser tabs for the right one, create an application shortcut and treat the webpage as a desktop application. To create a Chrome Application Shortcut, open the website, you would like to turn into an applicat…
23 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu