AdExchanger
AdExchanger
Jul 9, 2020
Cardlytics CEO Lynne Laube
40 min

You've probably seen ads served by Cardlytics within your digital banking interface, with card-linked offers (e.g. 10% back at Starbucks) matched to your past purchases. New CEO Lynne Laube talks about unlocking relationships with financial institutions, data privacy and other topics.   

Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Ep 351: Severine Schlumberger of Domaine Schlumberger and the very French side of Alsace
Séverine Schlumberger joins us for the third installment of our mini-tour of Alsace (first installment was Ep 343). To provide a counterpoint to Phillippe Blanck of Domaine Paul Blanck (Ep 250), the Schlumberger family is more devoutly French in attitude and Séverine tells us a different story of her family’s heritage, attitudes, and how Domaine Schlumberger developed and grew to become one of the largest family-owned domaines in Alsace. Founded by Nicolas Schlumberger in 1810, Domaine Schlumberger produces all estate-bottled wines from southern Alsace. The Schlumberger vineyards are among the largest in Alsace, and one of the largest blocks of contiguous vineyards in all of France. The Schlumberger domains operate and vinify 140 ha/346 acres of vines, half of which are spread over 4 Grands Crus, which have been in the family since 1810 -- Kitterlé, Kessler, Saering and Spiegel. The vineyard is sustainably managed, 30 ha is biodynamically farmed, and the Domaine is working on organic certification for the whole property. Séverine Schlumberger, co-owner of the Domaine, is part of the 7th generation running the estate. Here are the show notes: First we tackle history, as it is so essential in Alsace… * Séverine tells us about her family history in Alsace. She discusses how her family came from Germany to Guebwiller and how their family grew in size and diversified from wine to textiles, finance and oil in a network that stretched from Alsace, to Paris, to the United States. Séverine paints a picture of a family who very much considered themselves French and defied German occupation each time it occurred in the 19th and 20th * I ask Séverine if she finds that her family was particularly egalitarian because the prestige cuvées are named after the women: Christine, Anne, and Clarisse. In her very matter-of-fact, brass tacks style, Séverine tells us that her family was actually quite sexist, and that the women either needed to die or become very old to even be considered important in the domaine! I love the honesty! * We speak briefly about Michel Schlumberger in Sonoma, which a distant relative of Séverine’s established and then sold. In case you were wondering, there is no close tie between the wineries and wasn’t even before the sale to a holding company. Next we address the estate: * The Domaine is located on steep, dry, infertile hills with slopes of up to 50% gradient and at an altitude ranging from 820- 1280 ft/250 - 390 meters. It’s in the Haut-Rhin area of Alsace (the south), which is dry and considered top quality. * We discuss the Grand Cru vineyards and what makes each so special, Séverine likens each to her children and makes the analogy crystal clear for us. We also talk about some of the unique features of the vineyards – the use of stone terraces to prevent erosion, and the “franc-comtois” plough horses that the Domaine has used continuously since 1810. * Cool fact: this is one of the only types of horses that don’t have vertigo, and so they are perfect for steep vineyard work. * Séverine talks about how much of the Grand Cru grapes go into the basic tier, “Les Princes Abbés” wines. The wines aren’t mature for 15 years and the basic wines are essential for introducing wine drinkers to the world of Alsace, so they get special care. * We discuss the new classification system that is proposed (it would be like Burgundy’s system) and some of the qualms Séverine has with it. Then we discuss the standardization of a sweetness scale of the wines, tradition styles of Alsace, the use of very limited oak, and how climate change has affected the wines. Finally, Séverine tells us her wish for the future: that Alsace wines become as popular on wine lists and in shops as Bordeaux or Rhône, and that wine lovers recognize that every white wine style made exists is in Alsace and is readily available. I’m doing my part in drinking Alsace, I hope you are too! My favorite quote from the show... “For me the luxury of a wine producers is not to drive a Ferrari or to dress Chanel, it’s to be able to skip a wine if the vintage is not good enough, and that’s exactly what we’re doing…and the only reason we can do that is because we are family owned. If you belong to a big financial group, it’s over” (32:15) *All photos from https://www.domaines-schlumberger.com ________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Wine Access Visit: www.wineaccess.com/normal and for a limited time get $20 off your first order of $50 or more! I’m so excited to introduce Wine Access to you. Wine Access is a web site that has exclusive wines that overdeliver for the price (of which they have a range). * They offer top quality wines by selecting diverse, interesting, quality bottles you may not have access to at local shops. * Wine Access provides extensive tasting notes, stories about the wine and a really cool bottle hanger with pairings, flavor profile, and serving temps. * Wines are warehoused in perfect conditions and shipped in temperature safe packs. Satisfaction is guaranteed! Check it out today! www.wineaccess.com/normal Thanks to YOU! The podcast supporters on Patreon, who are helping us to make the podcast possible and who we give goodies in return for their help! Check it out today: https://www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople And to sign up for classes (now for UK and Euro time zones!) please go to www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes! Don't forget the bookplate offer for the book:
53 min
Secret Leaders
Secret Leaders
Dan Murray-Serter, Rich Martell
Alain de Botton & Anne-Marie Huby: How to do good, better
With host Dan Murray laid up in hospital, this special live episode is hosted by none other than the feisty, joyous force of nature, Resi founder, Alex Depledge. “We have a foundation at Resi that does pro bono work for architecture. People look at me a little bit sceptical, like, what's the motivation? You can't really earn a profit and do good at the same time. So why is building a for profit company better for society than building a charity?” Alex, alongside special guests Anne-Marie Huby of Just Giving and Alain de Botton of School of Life, discuss social enterprise, building for profit companies for good, and the question of whether this does or doesn't make more of an impact on society than charities. “When you think of the size of the charity sector, which in this country is commendably big, but you look at the wider overall economy, it stands to reason that if we want to live in a more fulfilling, equal, decent society, we're going to have to attend to what companies do.” Both of our guests, Anne-Marie and Alain, share their motivations for why they chose to create their businesses as for profits, rather than as charities, and spoiler alert, it’s not all about financial gain. “A business that wants to achieve good and make money has a double role, a business that merely wants to make money has a single mission. It's much harder to be a so-called good capitalist, because you're trying to hit two targets. You’ve got to work doubly hard.” Inspirational and insightful, this is another cracking, not-to-be-missed live episode. We chat about: * Churches don't have the monopoly on doing good * Good capitalism v bad capitalism * Maslow’s hierarchy of needs * The core issues with building charities * How can we make capitalism work * The effective altruism movement Links: * https://www.secretleaders.com/alex-depledge * https://www.secretleaders.com/alain-de-botton * https://www.secretleaders.com/anne-marie-huby Want to receive our podcast on a weekly basis? Subscribe to our newsletter!
1 hr 4 min
Gemba Academy Podcast: Lean Manufacturing | Lean Office | Six Sigma | Toyota Kata | Productivity | Leadership
Gemba Academy Podcast: Lean Manufacturing | Lean Office | Six Sigma | Toyota Kata | Productivity | Leadership
Ron Pereira: Lean Thinker & Co-Founder of Gemba Academy
GA 346 | Navigating the Gemba with Jay Hodge
This week's guest is Jay Hodge. Ron and Jay discussed the confusion around the word gemba and how gemba relates to kaizen. Jay has worked at GM, Toyota, and Caterpillar, to name a few, so he shared what it's like to make these transitions. A MP3 audio version of this episode is available for download here. In this episode you'll learn:  The quote that inspires Jay (2:38) Jay's background (3:19) Confusion around the gemba (5:01) Examples of kaizen and gemba (6:17) What it was like being at Toyota (9:59) What it's like going to other companies (14:37) Effectively using tools to sustain improvements (18:57) Factors in creating a culture of excellence (21:47) The lean treasure chest (24:16) Podcast Resources Right Click to Download this Podcast as an MP3 Download a Free Audio Book at Audible.com Jay's Website The Lean Treasure Chest Subscribe & Never Miss New Episodes! Click to Subscribe in iTunes If you enjoyed this podcast please be sure to subscribe on iTunes. Once you're a subscriber all new episodes will be downloaded to your iTunes account and smartphone. The easiest way for iPhone users to listen to the show is via the free, and incredible, Podcast app.  NEW! You can now follow the podcast on Spotify here.  You can also subscribe via Stitcher which is definitely Android friendly. What Do You Think? What does the word "gemba" mean to you?
28 min
Badass Digital Nomads
Badass Digital Nomads
Kristin Wilson
On Life, Death, and Coping with Grief
Reflections on life, death, and how to cope with grief, guilt, or regret after the passing of a loved one. Lessons learned from my grandparents, advice from Steve Jobs on how to seize the day, a song to make you think, and quotes from my favorite Stoic philosophers on how to live the good life without fearing death. Bonus: Questions to ponder from The Daily Stoic Journal: * What’s your role in the play of life? * Are you prepared for the randomness of fate and luck? * What principles will steer you through the flow of change? * What will remain when all else passes away? SHOW NOTES & RESOURCES * Book: The Daily Stoic Journal * Article: "A Stoic Response to Grief" * Article: "Lessons Learned in 15 Years as a Digital Nomad" * Song: Burgs by Mt. Wolf * Lyrics Video on YouTube ..................................................................................................... WORK WITH KRISTIN * Book a private consultation * Join the Make Money Mentorship 6-week program (Special offer for podcast listeners $100 off) * Relocate abroad with Orbis Relocation or Poker Refugees Support the Badass Digital Nomads Podcast: * Become a Patron * Leave a 5-Star Review * Leave a voice message * Submit a question or recommend a guest (feedback survey) * Buy new Badass Digital Nomads Merch (Teespring.com/Stores/TravelingwithKristin) Connect With Kristin on Socials: * * Follow on Instagram * Subscribe to Traveling with Kristin on YouTube * Subscribe to Digital Nomad TV on YouTube * Join the Badass Digital Nomads Facebook Group Podcast descriptions may contain affiliate links of products and services we use and recommend at no additional cost to you.
58 min
Chalk Radio
Chalk Radio
MIT OpenCourseWare
Searching for the Oldest Stars (Prof. Anna Frebel)
For millions of years after the Big Bang, nearly all the matter in the universe was in the form of hydrogen and helium; other elements like carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen only formed later, in nuclear reactions inside stars. To learn what the universe looked like back then, MIT astrophysicist Anna Frebel studies the oldest stars we can find—13 billion years old, to be precise—scanning them for traces of elements that will give a clue to their history. As Professor Frebel explains to Sarah Hansen in this episode, curiosity about the origins of the universe we live in is a profoundly human trait, just like curiosity about one’s own family history. To help communicate to laypeople the wonder and amazement that motivates astronomers like herself, Prof. Frebel has written a book and recorded a companion series of videos, both of which are intentionally designed to be as user-friendly as possible. It doesn’t matter, she says, if viewers and readers don’t grasp all the details; her hope is that they will develop the desire to understand more, and that that desire will spark further learning. Relevant Resources: MIT OpenCourseWare The OCW Educator Portal "Cosmic Origin of the Chemical Elements" on OCW Professor Frebel’s book_ Searching for the Oldest Stars_ Professor Frebel’s faculty page Music in this episode by Blue Dot Sessions Connect with Us If you have a suggestion for a new episode or have used OCW to change your life or those of others, tell us your story. We’d love to hear from you! Call us @ 617 475-0534 On our site On Facebook On Twitter On Instagram Stay Current Subscribe to the free monthly "MIT OpenCourseWare Update" e-newsletter. Support OCW If you like Chalk Radio and OpenCourseware, donate to help keep those programs going!
15 min
Business of Architecture Podcast
Business of Architecture Podcast
Enoch Bartlett Sears
343: Content Marketing for Design-Build Firms with David Pollard
Architect Dave Pollard started LivCo in 2012 to provide quality design to suburban homeowners, but with some twists to the traditional architectural services model. Following on the heels of his graduate thesis work stating “to make architecture more accessible, it’s time we stop trying to re-design the building systems, and architects lead the charge in re-thinking the design systems.” This evolved into his design-build model which allows simplified deliverables and a fully integrated and accountable team to deliver “the project”. LivCo has won numerous awards including fourteen Chicago Remodeling Excellence Awards, four regional remodeling excellence awards, Home of the Year Award, Contractor of the Year Award, five consecutive years Houzz Best in Service, Remodeling Big50, and in 2018, Dave was on ProRemodelers 40 under 40 list. In today's episode, you'll discover how Dave uses simple weekly videos to expand his company's visibility and win new work. ► Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for updates: https://www.youtube.com/c/BusinessofArchitecture ******* For more free tools and resources for running a profitable, impactful and fulfilling practice, connect with me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/businessofarchitecture Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/enoch.sears/ Website: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BusinessofArch Podcast: http://www.businessofarchitecture.com/podcast/ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/business-architecture-podcast/id588987926 Android Podcast Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/BusinessofArchitecture-podcast ******* Access the FREE Architecture Firm Profit Map video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Download the FREE Architecture Firm Marketing Process Flowchart video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Come to my next live, in-person event: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/live Carpe Diem!
21 min
Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Guy Kawasaki
Sarah Frey: Founder of Frey Farms, Author, and "Pumpkin Queen"
This episode’s guest is Sarah Frey, founder of Frey Farms. Sarah is an American farmer and entrepreneur, and author of The Growing Season. She is the CEO and owner of Frey Farms, which she founded at age sixteen. Frey Farms is the largest H-2A visa employer in Illinois as well as the largest grower of pumpkins in the United States. Sarah was branded The Pumpkin Queen by the New York Times. Frey's business negotiations with Walmart have been featured in a Harvard Business School study. In this episode we discussed:- How Sarah walked into Walmart at 19 and cut a deal- The Harvard Business reviews of her negotiation tactics- How to negotiate the best deal- What she wishes everyone knew about farmers and farming- How to scale your business This episode is brought to you by reMarkable, the paper tablet. It's my favorite way to take notes, sign contracts, and save all the instruction manuals to all the gadgets I buy. Learn more at remarkable.com I hope you enjoyed this podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes It takes less than sixty seconds, and it really makes a difference in swaying new listeners and upcoming guests. I might read your review on my next episode! Sign up for Guy's weekly email at http://eepurl.com/gL7pvD Connect with Guy on social media: Twitter: twitter.com/guykawasakiInstagram: instagram.com/guykawasakiFacebook: facebook.com/guyLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/Read Guy’s books: https://guykawasaki.com/books/ Thank you for listening and sharing this episode with your community.
1 hr 8 min
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