AdExchanger
AdExchanger
Jun 17, 2020
The Operative Word, With CEO Lorne Brown
Play episode · 45 min

Operative is an ad management technology platform serving some of the world’s biggest media companies. Its longtime CEO talks about the growth of his company, its 2016 merger with SintecMedia and what the future holds. "We always wanted to be the company that helps media businesses with their direct advertising business," he says.

Tribe of Mentors
Tribe of Mentors
Tim Ferriss
Naval Ravikant, Susan Cain, and Yuval Noah Harari
Please note that this episode originally aired on The Tim Ferriss Show podcast.  This episode features some of my favorite advice and profiles from Tribe of Mentors. Thousands of you have asked for years for the audiobook versions of Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors, and they are now both finally available at audible.com/ferriss. Today’s episode will focus on my first chapter in Tribe of Mentors, as well as the profiles of Naval Ravikant, Susan Cain, and Yuval Noah Harari. Just a few notes on the format before we dive in: I recorded the introduction and selected three fantastic, top-ranked narrators to handle the rest.  The short bios, which you will hear at the beginning of each profile, are read by Kaleo Griffith. Ray Porter reads my words as well as those of the male guests. The words of the female guests are performed by Thérèse Plummer. Tribe of Mentors is the ultimate choose-your-own-adventure book—a compilation of tools, tactics, and habits from more than 100 of the world’s top performers. From iconic entrepreneurs to elite athletes, from artists to billionaire investors, their short profiles can help you answer life’s most challenging questions, achieve extraordinary results, and transform your life. I am really happy with how the book turned out, and the universe helped me pull off some miracles for Tribe of Mentors (e.g., Ben Stiller; Temple Grandin; Ayaan Hirsi Ali; Yuval Noah Harari, whom you will hear in this episode; Arianna Huffington; Marc Benioff; Terry Crews; Dan Gable; and many more). It includes many of the people I grew up viewing as idols or demi-gods. So thanks, universe!  And if you only get one thing out of this book, let it be this: In a world where nobody really knows anything, you have the incredible freedom to continually reinvent yourself and forge new paths, no matter how strange. Embrace your weird self. There is no one right answer… only better questions. I wish you luck as you forge your own path. Please enjoy this episode, and if you’d like to listen to the other 100-plus profiles from Tribe of Mentors, please check out audible.com/ferriss.
1 hr
The Best 10% Of Tim Ferriss
The Best 10% Of Tim Ferriss
Tim Ferriss
Inside the Mind of Glenn Beck, You Find…Walt Disney and Orson Welles?
Contact: best10.timferriss@gmail.com Original: http://fourhourworkweek.com/2015/04/06/glenn-beck/ “When I turned 30, I knew my life was at a crossroads. It was either over, or I was going to restart.” – Glenn Beck [9:10] The goal of my blog and podcast is to push you outside of your comfort zone and force you to question assumptions. This is why I invite divergent thinkers and world-class performers who often disagree. I might interview Tony Robbins and then Matt Mullenweg. Or I might have a long chat with Sam Harris, PhD, and later invite a seemingly opposite guest like… Glenn Beck. This interview is a wild ride, and it happened — oddly enough — thanks to a late-night sauna session. I was catching up with an old friend, who is mixed-race, a Brown University grad, and liberal in almost every sense of the word. I casually asked him, “If you could pick one person to be on the podcast, who would it be?” “Glenn Beck,” he answered without a moment’s hesitation. “His story is FASCINATING.” He described how Glenn hit rock bottom and restarted his life in his 30’s, well past the point most people think it possible. Fast forward to 2014, Forbes named him to their annual Celebrity 100 Power List and pegged his earnings at $90 million for that year. This placed him ahead of people like Mark Burnett, Jimmy Fallon, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Will Smith. Glenn’s platforms — including radio, tv, digital (TheBlaze.com), publishing, etc. — get somewhere between 30 and 50 million unique visitors per month. This interview is neither a “gotcha” interview nor a softball interview. I ask some tough questions (e.g. “If you were reborn as a disabled gay woman in a poor family, what political system would you want in place?”), but my primary goal is to pull out routines, habits, books, etc. that you can use. This show is about actionable insight, not argument for argument’s sake. First and foremost, this is a story of entrepreneurship, and whether you love Glenn, hate Glenn, or have never heard his name, there is a lot to learn from him.
1 hr 50 min
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Ep 347: The Grape Miniseries -- Viognier
Saved from the brink of extinction just 50 years ago, Viognier (pronounced vee-ohn-yay), is a white grape that's native to the Northern Rhône in France – mainly the areas of Condrieu and Ampuis. The grape produces effusive wines with a strong aromatic character -- peaches, apricots, flowers, herbs, and ginger are common -- and when made well it has a medium body with a touch of acidity and a pleasant bitterness. This week we continue the grape mini-series (maxi series now?) by exploring this comeback kid and the pleasure it can bring when in the right hands. History Viognier's parentage is a bit ambiguous, but it is related to Mondeuse Blanche, which makes it either a half sibling or grandparent of Syrah (as MC Ice points out, we could definitely make a word problem out of this – it’s a brain twister to think about, but possible!). The grape is also tied to Freisa and may be related to Nebbiolo, both which are native to the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. Viognier was once grown pretty widely in the northern Rhône but the combination of the phylloxera outbreak in the mid- and late-19th century, followed by WWI, the Depression, and WWII drove a lot of growers to cities and left vineyards abandoned. By 1965, only about 30 acres (12 hectares) of Viognier vines remained in France, and the variety was nearly extinct. In the mid-1980s, interest started to grow both in France and from winegrowers in Australia and California. Growing interest lead to more plantings and today the grape is grown in Condrieu, Chateau Grillet, and Côte Rôtie in the Northern Rhône, all over the southern Rhône for blends, the Languedoc in southern France, as well as in North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and Spain. Climate and Vineyard * Viognier needs a long, warm growing season to fully ripen, but not so hot it develops excessive levels of sugar before its aromatic notes can develop. Viognier must get ripe to allow flavor to develop and that happens late, often after sugars develop. * Viognier is a small thick-skinned berry with good resistance to rot. It does well on acidic, granite soils. Older vines – more than 30 or 50 years old are best for the grape. * There are at least two clones of Viognier. The older, original one from Condrieu is highly aromatic and tight clustered. The other is healthier, higher yielding and looks and tastes different according to some. This clone, likely made at the University of Montpellier, is widespread in Australia. Winemaking begins in the vineyard – picking decision is vital: * Pick too early and the grape has no flavor, and makes a flat wine. Pick too late the wine is flabby and oily. Must be ripe but not overripe, with lower yields. * Although it is likely best to make the wine in stainless or neutral oak with perhaps some skin contact for a few hours before fermenting, the barrel fermentations, malolactic fermentations, and aging on lees can squash the unique flavor and scent of Viognier. Flavors and Styles * Viognier is like peach, apricot, clementine, honeysuckle, chamomile, jasmine, thyme, pine, spice, ginger, crème fraiche, and honey with a full body and can be oily, or sometimes a bit bitter. It is low in acidity. When aged in oak it tastes like vanilla bean and with malolactic fermentation it is creamy and custard-like. It is almost always high in alcohol, with 14.5% ABV being common. The best Viognier from France often doesn’t age, and even loses aromas after a few years in the bottle. Some of the styles from Australia and the US, which have been aged in oak, last a few more years. * The grape is often bottled as a single variety but can be blended with Roussanne, Marsanne, and Grenache Blanc. * We didn’t mention this in the show, but the wine can be off-dry or even late harvest and sweet. Condrieu and Château-Grillet produce sweet wines in warmer years. Regions... France Northern Rhône: Viognier is grown as single variety in Rhône appellations Condrieu and Château Grillet on right (west) bank of Rhône River. In Côte Rôtie, winemakers can include up to 20% of Viognier though most growers add no more than 5%. Condrieu * Includes seven communes along 14 miles, and makes wines that are usually dry, delicious young, and very aromatic wit structure. The area includes steep hillside vineyards, that face south-southeast to maximize morning sun, not hot evening sun. The soils are granite with a deep sandy topsoil called arzelle. This soil makes the best wine. Yields must be low, and picking must be after the grape has full aromatics. * Top producers: Guigal, Rostaing, Delas, Pierre Gaillard, Vernay, Francois Villard Chateau Grillet * This appellation is owned by one producer, it is a monopole. It is just 7.6 acres/3.08 ha on granite soil with mica – making the wines higher in acid. Vines are 80+ years old and although the area seems ideal, there have been problems with wine quality. Recently the owner of Château Latour of Bordeaux acquired the monopole; there’s hope for restoration of its former glory. Côte Rôtie * We did a whole podcast on this area, but north of Condrieu is Côte Rôtie, a Syrah appellation that can include up to 20% Viognier in the wine (in reality it’s more like 5%). Viognier helps darken the color of the Syrah in co-pigmentation but it takes up valuable real estate so it’s not used as much as it could be. Other French areas: The southern Rhône, where it is blended, the Languedoc and Ardeche, where it makes serviceable Vins de Pays varietal or blended wines. Other Europe: Switzerland, Austria, Italy New World Australia * Yalumba was the pioneer producer in South Australia’s Eden Valley in 1979. The Virgilius is their top wine (aged in oak). * McLaren Vale, Barossa, Adelaide Hills, Heathcote, Geelong, Central Victoria, and more grow the grape, which is a challenge to growers because it stays flavorless for much of the growing season and then transforms into something delicious – patience is a virtue! * One of the best uses for Viognier in Australia is its blends with Shiraz: * Clonakilla (Canberra), Yering Station (Yarra), Torbreck (Barossa) United States California * Viognier came in 1980s to California when John Alban (Alban Vineyards in Edna Valley), Josh Jensen of Calera (Central Coast), and Joseph Phelps (Napa), brought it into the United States in small quantities. The plantings and interest grew as a group of producers dedicated to growing Rhône varieties, called the Rhône Rangers, grew in numbers and popularity. Today California has more than 3,000 acres of Viognier. * Yields are high compared to France, the wines can often be overblown if grown in too-hot weather but the greatest examples are full-bodied and rich. * Top Producers: Tablas Creek, Crux, Qupé, Alban, Calera, Kunde Virginia * Viognier is a signature grape of Virginia because the thick skins of the grape work well in the humidity and the diurnals of the mountains mean Viognier can ripen but maintain acidity over a long growing season. The typical VA Viognier has great fruit, slight bitterness, medium body and good acidity. * Top producers: Barboursville, King Family, Horton * Other US: Oregon, Washington (we mention ABEJA), Texas * Around the World: New Zealand, South Africa, South America (Argentina has a lot, Chile some – all young plantings) Food: The wine is great with dishes that have rosemary, thyme, saffron, and creamy sauces. Expect to spend more than $50 a bottle for good Viognier (we had the 2017 version of the Guigal below. It was US$50). ___________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Thanks to YOU! The podcast supporters on Patreon, who are helping us to make the podcast possible and who we give goodies in return for their help! Check it out today: https://www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople And to sign up f…
43 min
The Straits Times Audio Features
The Straits Times Audio Features
The Straits Times and The Business Times
Over $5.5B to be paid out under Jobs Support Scheme from Oct 29: The Big Story Ep 48
The Big Story Ep 48: Over $5.5B to be paid out under Jobs Support Scheme from Oct 29 8:56 mins Synopsis: This is a special episode of The Straits Times' video series The Big Story. Over $5.5 billion under the Jobs Support Scheme will be paid out to more than 140,000 employers from Oct 29, to help them retain their workers amid the Covid-19 pandemic. With this latest round of payouts, the total amount disbursed under the scheme will exceed $21.5 billion. The Big Story hosts Hairianto Diman and Olivia Quay speak with the CEO of the Singapore Business Federation Ho Meng Kit as he weighs in on the extent to which the scheme has helped businesses. Read the story: https://str.sg/J6Y8 Produced and edited by: ST Video team and Muhammad Firmann Discover The Straits Times Videos: https://str.sg/JPrc Discover ST & BT podcasts: Channel: https://str.sg/JWVR Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2PwZCYU Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2Lu4rPP Google podcasts: http://str.sg/googlestbt Websites: http://str.sg/stbtpodcasts https://bt.sg/moneyhacks Feedback to: podcast@sph.com.sg  --- Discover more niche podcast series by ST and BT below: Follow Money Hacks Podcast on: http://bt.sg/btmoneyhacks Follow Health Check Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWaN Follow Asian Insider Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWa7 Follow Green Pulse Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWaf Follow Life Picks Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWa2 Follow #PopVultures Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWad Follow Bookmark This! Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWas Follow #GameOfTwoHalves Podcast on: https://str.sg/JWRE Follow our shows then, if you like short, practical podcasts! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
9 min
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Travis Sherry
20 Questions About Our New Beach House - Answered!
Heather and I have had a lot of questions about our new beach house in North Carolina and today they are getting answered. The questions are broken down into 3 categories which include general, logistics, and rental opportunities, and let's get started! Do you want to live on the beach? Would you like to rent Trav & Heather's beach house? Let us know by tagging us in a post on Instagram at @ExtraPackofPeanuts. Today's podcast is sponsored by Oregon State University ECampus.In This Episode * 07:30 How Long Do You Plan To Spend At The Beach House? * 12:00 Did You Sell The Philly House? Are You Renting The Philly House? * 14:15 How Did We Decided On The Location? * 19:20 Why Did You Decided To Buy Something So Far From Philly? * 21:15 Why The Carolina's And Not Abroad? * 22:20 Where Do You See Yourselves Buying Next? * 24:00 Where Did We Get Those Chairs?! * 24:45 How Did We Find This Property? * 27:20 How Did We Find A Realtor In North Carolina? * 33:00 What Was The House Buying Process Like For You? * 38:45 Is Flood & Hurricane Insurance Expensive? * 42:10 Do We Have Concerns About An Investment This Large During A Pandemic? * 45:55 Any Tips On Budgeting For Someone Who Wants To Buy A Place * 53:35 Are We Hiring A Property Manager For The Rental Of This House? * 55:25 Was The Beach House Previously A Vacation Rental? * 57:55 How Do We Home Renovate With 2 Little Ones? * 59:30 Has It Turned Out How We Thought It Would? Important Links * Oregon State University E-Campus * Never Split The Difference By Chris Voss * Location Indie * Want to follow our adventures? Check out our Instagram's @ExtraPackOfPeanuts, @HeatherSherry, and @TravelingWhitMyles Want More? * Top10 Favorite States * 16 Best Places To Live For 3 Years * Destination Diary: Asheville, North Carolina Leave a Review! Apple Podcast reviews are one of THE most important factors for podcasts. If you enjoy the show please take a second to leave the show a review on Apple Podcasts! * Click this link: Leave a review on Apple Podcasts * Hit “View in iTunes” on the left-hand side under the picture. * Leave an honest review. * You’re awesome!
1 hr 7 min
The Tech Talks Daily Podcast
The Tech Talks Daily Podcast
Neil C. Hughes
1376: Omnitracs: The Fleet Management Tech Driving Innovation
Omnitracs helps drive the transportation and distribution industries through key innovative software and SaaS fleet management solutions. Companies of all sizes trust them to improve visibility into real-time action for back-office and dispatch teams, create a more efficient driver experience through intuitive workflow and compliance tools, enable streamlined communications for better customer service, and help leadership teams make improved business decisions through actionable insights into fleet-data. Michal (Mic) Yariv discusses how the supply chain and trucking industry leverages data analytics to react to the pandemic in real-time and keep much-needed goods moving. She also shares how she has led an initiative to supply truckers with real-time alerts about COVID-19 cases in regions they were driving through as well as updates on stay-at-home orders, mask requirements, and restaurant and rest stop closures. We also discuss location intelligence and leveraging data to provide information about mechanics, food, rest stations, as well as calculate how long truckers are likely to spend at warehouses and where they need to go within those locations. Finally, we talk about the technology that provides real-time micro-weather information for truckers, helping them make decisions on the road that increase safety and efficiency. For example, if heavy rain is approaching, a driver can turn off cruise control before hitting bad weather.
30 min
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