AdExchanger
AdExchanger
May 13, 2020
Social Distancing With Friends: Matt Kilmartin
24 min

There’s no playbook for being head of a startup during a global pandemic, says Matt Kilmartin, CEO and co-founder of Habu, which launched in mid-February – just under a month before the lockdowns started. Also in this episode: Why the walking meeting is good for both health … and sanity.

Perpetual Chess Podcast
Perpetual Chess Podcast
Ben Johnson
Book Recap- Talking Improve Your Chess Now, with FM Alex Chua
Welcome back to another edition of Perpetual Chess, Chess Books Recaptured, a monthly bonus book recap podcast. This week, I am joined by FM Alex Chua, a 32 year old Texas based dad, who works for a green chemical manufacturing startup called Solugen. Alex wanted to discuss the underrated gem, Improve Your Chess Now by GM Jonathan Tisdall, which he and I both love. We think it provides a great blend of instructive games, practical advice, philosophizing, and humor. It presents fairly challenging material, which is probably best suited to intermediate to advanced players, but anyone can pick up at least a few things from this book, as we hope they can from this podcast. Please read on for more details and timestamps.  0:00- FM Alex Chua and I begin by discussing why we love this book and wanted to talk about it.    12:45- For what rating level is this book most appropriate? Alex thinks 1400-2000, I think 1800-2300.    17:30- As always, Perpetual Chess is brought to you in part by Chessable.com. Two great courses to improve your chess now are: The Checkmate Patterns Manual and the Visualize Series. Links below: https://www.chessable.com/the-checkmate-patterns-manual/course/17841/ https://www.chessable.com/visualise-1/course/25695/   18:30- We list the chapters and then discuss our favorite chapters.  Mentioned: The Complete Chess Swindler, The Seven Deadly Chess Sins  26:30- Why discuss two of the key concepts investigated in the book, GM Alexander Kotov’s “tree of analysis”, and the idea of using “stepping stone diagrams” to improve blindfold/visualization skills.  Mentioned: Book Recap Podcast of Think like a Grandmaster with NM Christopher Chabris, GM Alexander Kotov’s Think Like a Grandmaster, GM Anatoly Lein, GM Jacob Aagaard, Book Recap Podcast of Blindfold Chess with Jerry Wells, Zurich 1953 by GM David Bronstein, GM Lubosh Kavalek, GM Anatoly Karpov, GM Ljubomir Ljubovic, GM Efim Geller, GM Vassily Ivanchuk, GM Boris Gelfand    48:00- We share a few of our favorite quotes and aphorisms from the book.  Mentioned: GM Sam Shankland’s Small Steps to Giant Improvement    1:00:00- What are favorite games shared in the book? What are the chess improvement takeaways?    Ljubobevic-Torre 1975 , Polugaevsky-Petrosian 1983, IM Cyrus Lakdawala’s Rewire Your Chess Brain,GM Baadur Jobava’s Twitch Channel, Chessable’s Checkmate Patterns Manual    1:14:00- In lieu of payment, I am making a donation of Alex’s behalf to Lichess.org. Keep up the great work, Team Lichess!  Mentioned: Simple Chess by Michael Stean, coming next month    You can message FM Alex Chua on lichess. Here is his account: https://lichess.org/@/highlama   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1 hr 27 min
Business of Architecture Podcast
Business of Architecture Podcast
Enoch Bartlett Sears
344: An Intentional Architecture Business Model with Nicole Hardman
Today I speak with Australian architect Nicole Hardman. Over 15 years ago Nicole and architect Bryan Miller started Practicing ARChitecture Pty Ltd (PARC), a small education provider specialising in professional development programs for Architects, specifically helping emerging architects pass the Australian Architecture Practice Examination. On today's episode you'll discover how Nicole and Bryan developed one of the most influential practice courses in Australia. You'll also learn about Nicole's intentional business model that let's her work on the parts of projects she finds most fulfilling. ► Subscribe to my YouTube Channel for updates: https://www.youtube.com/c/BusinessofArchitecture ******* For more free tools and resources for running a profitable, impactful and fulfilling practice, connect with me on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/businessofarchitecture Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/enoch.sears/ Website: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BusinessofArch Podcast: http://www.businessofarchitecture.com/podcast/ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/business-architecture-podcast/id588987926 Android Podcast Feed: http://feeds.feedburner.com/BusinessofArchitecture-podcast ******* Access the FREE Architecture Firm Profit Map video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Download the FREE Architecture Firm Marketing Process Flowchart video here: http://freearchitectgift.com Come to my next live, in-person event: https://www.businessofarchitecture.com/live Carpe Diem!
38 min
App Marketing by App Masters
App Marketing by App Masters
Steve Young
812: Framework for Scaling New Growth Channels with Shoji Ueki
Coming up is an interview from our first virtual summit from July 2018 with then Senior Director of Growth Marketing at SeatGeek, Shoji Ueki. You will discover how to find new growth channels, the framework for scaling that new channel and a better understanding of how your marketing efforts drive value to your company. Shoji Ueki is currently the VP of Marketing at Grailed. When we did this interview he was the Senior Director of Growth Marketing at SeatGeek. *************** SPONSORS SocialPeta is the world’s leading advertisement creative spy and analysis platform, dedicated to offering top ads creative and marketing strategy for both advertisers and publishers. Serving as an essential ad and marketing intelligence platform, SocialPeta focuses on Ad Intelligence, Cost Intelligence, and Ad Creatives. SocialPeta has more than 200 enterprise clients including Google, Supercell, Fun Plus, Bigo Live and 37games. Checkaso is an analytical ASO platform that provides you with up-to-date data on keywords, competitors, ratings, and reviews. It also rates your ASO level and gives you custom tips on how to improve it. This way, you can increase your app page visibility, organic traffic, and installs with every update. Try it now for 7 days for free at checkaso.io. *************** Follow us: YouTube: AppMasters.com/YouTube Instagram: @stevepyoung Twitter: @stevepyoung Facebook: App Masters ***************
31 min
FOR DUMMIES: The Podcast
FOR DUMMIES: The Podcast
TWA Podcast Studio
While you’re home learn the lucrative world of day trading!
There’s a common misconception that you can declare yourself a day trader, sit down at the computer in your bathrobe, and you’re going to be so busy counting the money you make, you’ll hardly have a chance to take lunch breaks. In reality, it is an incredible amount of work and requires discipline, education, attention to detail, and expert advice! This week we are joined by Annie Logue, MBA, the author of “Day Trading for Dummies.” Annie's an accomplished financial journalist as well as a lecturer at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This podcast may not earn you a UIC diploma, but I promise it’ll make you smarter about day trading. About Eric Martsolf With over 3500 episodes of television under his belt, Mr. Martsolf has been providing "love in the afternoon" for NBC Daytime for the last 17 years. His portrayals of Ethan Winthrop on "Passions" and currently Brady Black on "Days of our Lives" have resulted in numerous industry accolades. He made daytime history in 2014 by being the first actor ever to win an Emmy in the Best Supporting Actor category for "Days of our Lives." His television credits expand into primetime (Extant, NCIS, Rizzoli & Isles), and his musical theatre repertoire consists of over 40 productions, including his critically acclaimed role as the Pharaoh in the Osmond Broadway Tour of "Joseph." Fans of the DC Universe will most notably recognize him as Justice League member and futuristic hero Booster Goldfrom the series Smallville. @ericmartsolf - Twitter (Blue check mark) ericmartsolf - Instagram (Blue check mark) About Annie Logue, MBA Annie is highly experience in financial services and has taught business administration at the University of Illinois. She is a finance writer who has written numerous articles on investment and has edited publications on equity trading and risk management. @annielogue - Twitter
27 min
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Ep 353: Women in Wine and the Subtle Symphony of Quiet Misogyny
This is a transcript of the first part of the podcast. The second part of the show discusses these points in more detail. Women in Wine and the Subtle Symphony of Quiet Misogyny After mulling over the various scandals in wine lately, and thinking about my position in the wine world, I have a perspective to add beyond just a social media post to call out the behavior of those in the wine business, those who have minimized the situation, and the hollow calls for change that likely won’t happen. Part I: What’s in the news, and what I have seen… If you missed it, in the past few months, a spate of “scandals” has broken out in the wine world regarding women in wine. First, it was the #winebitch scandal in the United Kingdom. This occurred when a well-known TV wine personality from the “Wine Show” in the UK and his cronies passed around text messages debasing young female and “softer” male wine influencers. I didn’t see these messages before they were removed from the web, but I’ve heard from those who did that the threads were raunchy, rude rants. They were also far-reaching – covering everything from the lack of value of these people’s contributions to the wine world (one could say that topic is at least ok to discuss although not in the manner raised) to criticizing their looks, children, and families (not even remotely ok). On the heels of this, an exposé in the New York Times revealed that the highest-ranking men of the cult of Master Sommeliers, as I like to call it and have written about before, have been demanding sexual favors and even raping (young) women in exchange for guaranteed career advancement. I have made the argument for a long time that the Court of Master Sommeliers is an exclusive in-crowd of people who know each other and who dictate membership based not only on skill but on favoritism. Apparently, that favoritism stretches far beyond the run of the mill BS that I had speculated about. Is this surprising? No. When I worked at the big hulking winery in the mid-2000s, executive assistants who had been there for 35 years told me that the senior executives and owners used to say wildly inappropriate things to them, and kiss and grope them while they were trying to work. Although these women tried (literally) to run away from these predators, this mistreatment was acceptable behavior and the women’s silence was the only way to maintain employment. I’m not excusing the behavior, but maybe this legacy means we need to take a historical view to understand the issues. Wine in the United States is an old school industry. Its very structure is based on something that was set up in 1933 after Congress’s failed attempt to ban alcohol through a constitutional amendment. Doubting the public could handle itself properly, Congress encouraged states to set up roadblocks and a three-tier system that treats adults as children with choices made for them about what, when, and how they can buy wine, gives certain huge producers and distributors power over markets, and in certain states, despite Supreme Court rulings, denies citizens the ability to procure the wines they prefer to drink. Further, for those in the industry, if you don’t drink copious amounts with your customers and co-workers, and if you are a woman not willing to be a good old boy and listen to piggish talk and smoke cigars, you’re a pariah. It’s an industry based on power in the hands of the few (like many industries). The deification of sommeliers, who completely disconnect with the very people they are supposed to serve in pursuit of a title that will give them power, is another outgrowth of this. The conclusion: the wine industry is based on other people who apparently know better than you (whomever you are), making decisions for you that you may or may not agree with. The recent scandals prove that little has changed since the incidents of the “Mad Men” era the women at the big winery told me about. And as more women have entered the industry, the opportunities for this kind of behavior have just multiplied. Sexism in the wine industry is a subtle symphony of quiet misogyny. As for me, I can’t count the number of times I have been ignored when I am in a group of industry men talking about wine. I am usually invisible to them and generally have no value. When I am with MC Ice in a setting that is not for podcast fans and listeners, men ask him the questions about wine even after he tells them what I do. And although I was too old and not cute enough to be a candidate for sexual harassment when I entered wine (I’m not sad about this, don’t worry!), the invisibility factor and belittlement factor was high with my male colleagues and bosses. Women in high positions in wine are also guilty of this type of behavior – ignoring those they feel are unimportant or who lack status (men and women at conferences will ignore me until someone else tells them my audience is large and then there’s huge interest on their part, huge disgust on mine). Plenty of women in wine are just about self-preservation. In fact, an article by Jancis Robinson is nothing short of a “there’s nothing to see here” rant about how the younger generation has social media to make “a fuss” as she puts it. She argues that change should come for the economic viability of the wine industry, not for the absolute immorality of the acts of misogyny and inequality. I fear that her stance and that of those who support her show us that many women of the old guard are equally at fault for ignoring what goes on in the real world with normal wine people, AKA, the unwashed masses. Part II: The Solution -- No, it’s not more women’s only groups or women’s scholarships I don’t really consider myself part of the industry -- I chose to blaze my own path and work with what I consider to be the best sides of wine – producers and wine drinkers – and abandon the business for the very reasons I just described. Because of that I often stay out of these debates. But this is one that I need to discuss. Because like everything else in wine, the issue has been framed in a way that just doesn’t work and won’t bring structural change. So now I’d like to talk about the fix. Because the fix is not letting the men and women with stale ideas in the wine industry and financial interest steer this ship. And this is what is happening now. The wine industry LOVES to take the issue of the day, elevate it, and sweep it under the rug, or marginalize it so it becomes a splinter group. That’s what I see happening now: women’s initiatives! Let’s create a group to forward the cause of Women in Wine! Let’s make it so that women get promoted and we have our own safe space! Let’s give scholarships to women! This tack lacks imagination and accomplishes nothing: We’ve already done this and it doesn’t work. The large corporations become sponsors of these “women-first” organizations so the problems they themselves create in the industry can’t be discussed in an open forum. Further, often the events are too costly and in places where the people who would benefit most can’t afford to get to (Napa and New York ain’t cheap). And frankly, once these organizations are off the ground, the women form their own in-crowd and never reach the people who may need the most help; Think of the young woman starting out in wine in Alabama who may be getting harassed but has nowhere to turn, or the sommelier in Omaha who has been told she can’t advance because men won’t take her seriously at a steakhouse. The elite women’s groups and scholarships for the few lucky enough to get them do nothing to help the majority of women. And while I applaud the people who are trying to lift up other women (unlike many in the old guard who feel they need to keep rising stars down to maintain their own status), we do not and cannot operate in a bubble. These organizations that are…
43 min
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