292 | From Brexit to Scottish Independence
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We try to join the dots from the final days of the Brexit negotiations to the looming prospect of another referendum on Scottish independence. Can the government really risk a no-deal outcome? Will the SNP still hold a referendum if the courts say no? What will Labour do? Plus we ask how COVID politics intersects with the fate of the Union. With Helen Thompson, Anand Menon and Kenneth Armstrong.

The New Statesman Podcast
The New Statesman Podcast
New Statesman
Rules of the Roadmap
Boris Johnson has outlined his four-step plan to bring the UK out of lockdown. The Prime Minister announced pupils will return to schools on 8 March, with rules relaxing in phases thereafter. If strict criteria are met, all restrictions on social contact could be lifted by 21 June.  On this episode of the New Statesman podcast, Stephen Bush and Anoosh Chakelian look at the plan and read between the lines of Boris Johnson's choice of language. Then, in You Ask Us, they tackle your questions on the seeming mismatch between the drugs policies of major parties and public positioning on that issue. More from the New Statesman: Stephen explains why new Covid-19 variants are the greatest threat to Boris Johnson's lockdown roadmap. Martin Fletcher writes that Boris Johnson must now announce a public inquiry into the UK’s Covid-19 catastrophe. Martha Gill asks: how did the government get duped by the myth of "freedom loving" Britain? Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12. We'd love to hear from you. Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. You can follow Stephen Bush on twitter @stephenkb. Anoosh Chakelian is @Anoosh_C and Ailbhe Rea is @PronouncedAlva. More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our weekly global affairs show World Review If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26 min
Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill
The Intercept
The Democrats’ Long War on Immigrants
As Joe Biden took the oath of office this January, Guatemalan security forces at the Honduran border thwarted thousands of U.S.-bound migrants. While decades-long American imperialism has facilitated displacement throughout the region, the U.S. is increasingly outsourcing its deadly immigration policy. This week on Intercepted: The Biden administration announced it will begin to process the 25,000 asylum seekers stuck in squalid border town camps as part of Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy. But immigration advocates fear President Biden will not reverse the bipartisan trend of his predecessors to further militarize the southern border and expand the reaches of immigration enforcement — policies that have led to more migrant deaths and detention in recent decades. Despite Biden’s executive actions to reverse the Muslim ban, initiate migrant family reunification, and fortify DACA, his administration has indicated that it will continue to support Mexican and Guatemalan armed enforcement of their borders on behalf of the U.S.T The activist and writer Harsha Walia joins Intercepted to discuss the Democratic Party’s fundamental role in shaping the long arc of U.S. border policy and why the practice of “prevention through deterrence” will continue to incur more suffering and preventable deaths. She also presents an abolitionist view of a world without borders. Walia’s most recent book is “Border and Rule: Global Migration, Capitalism, and the Rise of Racist Nationalism.”   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
26 min
OH GOD, WHAT NOW? Formerly Remainiacs
OH GOD, WHAT NOW? Formerly Remainiacs
Podmasters
Free Speech For You… But Not You
What if they gave a War on Woke and nobody came? The Government decides to both defend free speech (if you’re a right winger on campus) and restrict it (if you run a stately home named after a slave owner). So that makes sense. Plus: As there’s no credible recovery programme for education, Gráinne Hallahan of the Times Education Supplement joins us to set one out. Gav, call us yeah?  Meanwhile… Ros gets a COVID jab! The Arts get their own special No Deal Brexit! And in the Extra Bit, we watch Adam Curtis’s collage-doc digital jeremiad Can’t Get You Out Of My Head.  * “Each side of this culture war is proclaiming itself as the true arbiter of history.” – Nina Schick * “Voltaire and Rousseau wrestled with free speech. Now the Government has decided it’s time for Gavin Williamson to sort it out.” – Alex Andreou * “The Government likes the idea of free speech but doesn’t want on engage in any of the complexities.” – Ros Taylor * “History is never static.… Let Britain’s monuments be evaluated in terms of what they mean now.” – Nina Schick * “Boris Johnson thinks schools are safe, it’s just the children going into them that make them dangerous…” – Gráinne Hallahan * “If the National Theatre can’t tour the EU, then nobody can do it.” – Alex Andreou Presented by Dorian Lynskey with Nina Schick, Alex Andreou and Ros Taylor. Produced by Andrew Harrison. Assistant producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Alex Rees. OH GOD, WHAT NOW? is a Podmasters production.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr
World Review from the New Statesman
World Review from the New Statesman
New Statesman
Myanmar's Democratic Future
Large scale protests have been taking place in Myanmar since a military coup on February 1st deposed the democratically-elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. This week, the UN Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Myanmar reported that the military were being deployed to the city of Yangon, raising fears of bloodshed. Protesters are calling for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other political prisoners, but activist groups have raised concerns that even that may not be enough to restore democracy in Myanmar. On this episode of World Review from the New Statesman, Emily Tamkin in Washington DC and Ido Vock in Berlin are joined by Wai Hnin Pwint Thon, an activist for Burma Campaign UK whose father was one of those arrested in the days following the military coup. They discuss why the military have taken power, what this means for Myanmar, and whether there is a road to true democracy for the country. Further reading: Francis Wade has also been following the situation in Myanmar, and has written this piece exploring how democracy might be defined after the military coup. Emily has been reporting on the Texas storms that have caused power outages leaving millions in freezing conditions without heating or hot water. She writes that the storms offer a warning to ill-prepared governments. Ido discusses how new variants of Covid 19 could continue to limit international travel for years beyond the immediate crisis. We'd love to hear from you! Send us your You Ask Us questions at youaskus.co.uk. Find us on Twitter: @idvck and @emilyctamkin. Subscribing to the New Statesman helps us keep producing this podcast. You can now subscribe for 12 weeks for just £12. Visit newstatesman.com/subscribe12 More audio from the New Statesman: listen to our twice-weekly UK politics podcast The New Statesman podcast If you are a New Statesman digital subscriber you can get ad-free access to this podcast by visiting newstatesman.com/nssubscribers.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
27 min
Worldly
Worldly
Vox
The world’s great powers
Zack, Jenn, and Alex break down one of the DC foreign policy world’s hottest new catchphrases: “great power competition.” It’s the idea that international politics in the 21st century will be dominated by a struggle for influence between the US, China, and (to a lesser extent) Russia. The gang talks about what the concept actually means and whether it’s a useful framework for understanding international politics today and in the future. References: Dan Nexon’s Foreign Affairs article inspired the Worldly crew to record this episode. The Atlantic had an excellent piece explaining how “great power competition” became a DC buzzword. The National Interest had an op-ed detailing why great power competition could be a problem. Matthew Kroenig wrote in Foreign Policy on how the US should outline goals for its competition with China. The Congressional Research Service has a comprehensive report on what “great power competition” has meant in recent years. Hosts: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Jennifer Williams (@jenn_ruth), senior foreign editor, Vox Alex Ward (@AlexWardVox), White House reporter, Vox   Consider contributing to Vox: If you value Worldly’s work, please consider making a contribution to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts   More to explore: Subscribe for free to Today, Explained, Vox’s daily podcast to help you understand the news, hosted by Sean Rameswaram.   About Vox: Vox is a news network that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines.   Follow Us: Vox.com  Newsletter: Vox Sentences Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
54 min
Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
Pitchfork Economics with Nick Hanauer
Civic Ventures
The velocity of money (with Ann Pettifor)
Over the last century, the velocity of money—the rate at which money changes hands through the economy—has declined. Today, money moves at one of the slowest rates on record, meaning every dollar today generates 70% less economic activity than a dollar did just ten years ago. That has big implications for our economy. Political economist Ann Pettifor joins Nick and Goldy to explain how the velocity of money is related to money creation, and why taxing the rich is ultimately pro-growth (it’s all related, we promise!).  Ann Pettifor is a political economist, author, and public speaker, and the Director of PRIME (Policy Research in Macroeconomics). Her work focuses on the global financial system, sovereign debt restructuring, international finance, and sustainable development. She is the author of many books, including The Production of Money and The Case for the Green New Deal.  Twitter: @AnnPettifor Show us some love by leaving a rating or a review! RateThisPodcast.com/pitchforkeconomics  Further reading:  Want to expand the economy? Tax the rich!  https://prospect.org/power/want-expand-economy-tax-rich/  A world awash in money: https://media.bain.com/Images/BAIN_REPORT_A_world_awash_in_money.pdf What does money velocity tell us about low inflation in the U.S.? https://www.stlouisfed.org/on-the-economy/2014/september/what-does-money-velocity-tell-us-about-low-inflation-in-the-us  Vultures are circling our fragile economy… https://www.annpettifor.com/2020/06/vultures-are-circling-our-fragile-economy/  Decades of empirical research finds no inverse correlation between top tax rates and growth:  https://archive.org/stream/R42111TaxRatesandEconomicGrowth-crs/R42111%20Tax%20Rates%20and%20Economic%20Growth_djvu.txt https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/09_Effects_Income_Tax_Changes_Economic_Growth_Gale_Samwick.pdf http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/107919/1/Hope_economic_consequences_of_major_tax_cuts_published.pdf  https://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2016/04/20/a-graphical-assault-on-supply-side-tax-cuts/  Website: http://pitchforkeconomics.com/ Twitter: @PitchforkEcon Instagram: @pitchforkeconomics Nick’s twitter: @NickHanauer
42 min
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