IS THE JOKER'S LAUGHING AND CRYING PATHOLOGICAL IN NATURE1
Play • 4 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
225: The Self-Centered Podcast Featuring Special Guest, Dr. Jill Levitt!
At the start of today’s podcast, we got an update on the Feeling Great app from Jeremy Karmel. We are looking for one or more programmers who might like to join our project. Our goal is to create the first electronic tool that can outperform human therapists, and some super promising preliminary data suggests we may be on the right path to make this happen. We are looking for talented engineers and designers who would share our passion for this incredible dream. If you are interested, contact Jeremy@FeelingGreatapp.com Today we are joined by our beloved and brilliant colleague, Dr. Jill Levitt to ask two questions: * Can the “self” be judged? * Does the “self” exist? We got quite a bit of positive feedback to a recent Ask David Podcast that included a question about Buddhism, but people said they wanted more on the topic of the “great death” of the self. Bottom line was this: * You can judge your own or someone else’s specific thoughts and actions, but you cannot judge your (or somebody else’s) “self.” * The question, “does the ‘self’ exist,” is meaningless. * The goal of therapy is not to get promoted from the “worthless” to the “worthwhile” category, but to reject these categories as having no meaning. David argues that it is impossible to feel depressed without the distortions of Overgeneralization and Labeling—that where you jump from a specific flaw or problem, like getting rejected by your boyfriend to some abstract label or judgment, like thinking you are “unloveable.” We also used the real-life example of David responding to criticisms that he was too harsh with Steven Hayes on Episode 220. We show how TEAM therapy works, and illustrate several techniques for crushing the Negative Thoughts that lead to the painful negative thoughts that including Overgeneralization and Labeling, including: * Empathy * Positive Reframing * Externalization of Voices * Be Specific * Acceptance Paradox * Feared Fantasy We also focused on the concept of “laughing enlightenment,” a key Buddhist concept, along with the “great death” of the self. When you lose your “self,” you actually lose nothing, because there was nothing there in the first place. This is a kind of cosmic joke. But you inherit the world and gain liberation from your suffering, along with great joy, and of course, sadness as well. We also summarized the thinking of Ludwig Wittgenstein, arguably the greatest philosopher of all time, and how his sudden insight when a soccer ball hit him in the head transformed the history of philosophy. He was an extremely lonely man who had numerous episodes of depression, and never attempted to publish anything when he was alive, because only a handful of students and colleagues could understand what he was trying to say. This was intensely frustrating to him, because his message was so simple, clear, and basic—and yet the great philosophers could not grasp it. The Buddha had the same problem. The book, Philosophical Investigations was published in 1950, right after his death. It is just a series of numbered paragraphs, or brief comments, on different everyday themes, like bricklayers, string, games, and so forth. It is was based on a metal box they found under his bed, which contained notes from his weekly seminars at Cambridge. Many people, including myself, consider it as the greatest book in the history of philosophy, and think of Wittgenstein as the man who killed, or ended, philosophy. According to Wikipedia, the famed British philosopher, Bertrand Russell, described Wittgenstein as "perhaps the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived; passionate, profound, intense, and dominating." Although Wittgenstein did not focus emotional problems, his solution to all the problems of philosophy is very similar to cognitive therapy. Here is the parallel: You don’t try to solve the classic “free will” problem. Instead, you see through it and give it up as nonsensical, as language that's "out of gear," so to speak. Once you “see this,” and understand why it is true, it is incredibly liberating. But it can be a lonely experience, because you suddenly “see” something super-obvious that seems to be invisible to 99.9% of humans. It's as if you had a "third eye," and could see something incredible that people with only two eyes cannot see. By the same token, when you suddenly “see” that the idea that you have a “self” which could be “superior” or “inferior” is nonsensical, it is also incredibly liberating. This, in fact, is the cognitive therapy version of spiritual “enlightenment.” And that's also one of the goals of the TEAM-CBT that my collegues and I have created. Jill, Rhonda, and David
1 hr 18 min
The Anxious Truth - REAL Help For Panic, Anxiety and Agoraphobia
The Anxious Truth - REAL Help For Panic, Anxiety and Agoraphobia
The Anxious Truth
EP 140 - We Do NOT Accept And Float Through Abuse (w/Joe Ryan)
I am often asked an important question. "How do I learn to float and accept when one person makes me anxious?"  This question is asked by people that will often explain that they experience anxiety or even panic when in the presence of a specific person or group of people.  Often, there is a history of abuse, or there is ongoing abuse of varying types (mental, emotional, or even physical).  So the question I am really being asked is, "How can I float through being with someone that has harmed me or is harming me right now?" The answer is simple.  You are not required to accept and float through abuse.  Not now.  Not ever.  I am teaching you how to become non-reactive to irrational fear.  Fear that feels real, but has no basis in reality. This is why we learn to accept that fear and float through it.  This is why we surrender to it.  Because in doing so we learn that there is no real danger, and that we no longer have to be afraid.  When in an abusive relationship, there is REAL DANGER.  REAL HARM is being done.  Your fear and your anxiety are justified!  I am not teaching you how to float through that. My old friend Joe Ryan joined me to discuss this important topic and share his experience with abusive relationships. For full show notes on this episode: https://theanxioustruth.com/140 My books, podcast, and social media links: https://theanxioustruth.com/links Music Credit: "Afterglow" by Ben Drake (https://facebook.com/BenDrakeMusic) with permission --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theanxioustruth/support
29 min
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
The Psych Central Podcast: Mental Health Made Simple
Healthline Media
Stigma of Borderline Personality Disorder
The stigma associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD) is well documented and undeserved. In this week’s episode, Dr. James Seymour explains this complicated condition, discusses the “borderline” label, and explores the role past traumas may have in the development of BPD. Psychiatrist Dr. Seymour is the director of the Sierra Tucson’s Chrysalis Program. Listen now! Guest Information for 'Stigma of Borderline' Podcast Episode Psychiatrist Dr. James Seymour, who joined Sierra Tucson in 2010, is the Director of the Arizona-based mental health treatment center’s patient-centered Chrysalis Program. Dr. Seymour received his medical degree from the University of Tennessee and completed his psychiatric residency at the University of Virginia. He is a Somatic Experiencing Therapy practitioner, and board-certified by both the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the American Board of Addiction Medicine. Trained in Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy, Dr. Seymour’s expertise spans trauma recovery, addictions, cognitive behavioral therapy, and somatic mind-body therapies. About The Psych Central Podcast Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
24 min
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT
Ep. 173: Things to Know When Starting Therapy
Welcome back to another episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast. Today I would like to discuss with you a question that comes up quite a lot when I am starting with a new client. So often my clients will say to me "What can I expect during my first session?" I want to share with you what I tell my clients about the things to know when starting therapy. The first thing I say to my clients is that your brain can change. You may have a disorder that was inherited or triggered by a certain event, but the good news is that by changing your behavior, you can actually change your brain. The second thing I say is that no matter your mental health struggle, there is a science proven way to treat that disorder. We have evidence based treatments and you can absolutely can get better. Thirdly, I tell my clients that no matter what struggles they are going through, it is not their fault. This is not something they asked to have happen. We are going to move away from assigning blame and move towards self-compassion. The fourth thing I would say is that you should not enjoy coming to see me. The work can be really hard and it will mean facing your fears, so if you are enjoying coming to see me then we may need to look at the reasons why. The goal is to actually give my clients the tools they need so that they do not need me anymore. Finally I tell my clients that they need to be prepared to do the hard work. There will be lots of homework and a lot of facing your fears, but nothing changes if they are not willing to do the work. I always remind them that it is a beautiful day to do those hard things. If you get a moment, please go over to wherever you listen to podcasts, whether that be Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, Podbean, and leave an honest review. Tell me how you feel about it, whether it's helping you, what you'd like to see. We are going to give away a pair of Beats headphones of your choice of color once we hit a thousand reviews! ERP School, BFRB School and Mindfulness School for OCD are open for purchase. Click here for more information. Additional exciting news! ERP School is now CEU approved which means that it is an accredited course for therapists and mental health professionals to take towards their continuing education credit hours. Please click here for more information. Ep. 173 Transcript: Guys, I am so grateful to have you with me today. I know your time is incredibly precious and valuable, and so I'm so happy to just be with you. How are you doing? Just checking in. How is everybody? It is well and truly 2021. Lots and lots of happening in the world. Lots and lots of changes. I'm just wrapping my head around them all. In this new year, I made a deal with myself to spend a little bit more time on social media, which is so funny because I think most people were saying, “No, I think I'd like to spend less time.” I'm actually saying, “No, I'd like to spend more time on social media.” I hang out a lot on Instagram and on the Facebook group called CBT School Campus or on my Facebook page. I promised myself I'd spend more time there because I'm realizing after last year that I felt really disconnected to you guys and I really wanted to get back into feeling connected. I have loved it. If you're on Instagram, go over and follow me @kimberleyquinlan, or you can go over to the Facebook group. It's CBT School Campus, or my Facebook is Kimberly Quinlan with CBT School after it. That being said, I just wanted to let you know that today, I wanted to chat with you about something I have not talked about, but I thought it would be a really great topic. A lot of people in the new year have been reaching out, looking for clinical services – help for OCD, help for anxiety, help for an eating disorder, or help for a BFRB. We love helping people. I have a great staff of seven licensed therapists who all treat the same disorders that I do. It's just been so wonderful to see all the new clients and people coming in really ready to get help. It really came across my mind in that one of the questions new patients and clients have is: What should I expect in the first session? What does the first session look like? What would you tell me in the first session? I thought this would be a great topic to talk to you guys about. So I want to share with you the five things I tell every single client or patient in their first session. Are you ready? Let's do it. Once I have introduced myself and they've introduced themselves and they tell me a little bit about their struggles and what they're wanting to work on, I, at some point in the session, are going to tell them I'll do a thorough assessment. But I will, at some point, either at the beginning or at the end or somewhere, wherever it's most appropriate, share with them one major piece of good news. 1. Your brain can change. Even if you have a disorder that may be is hereditary, has been passed down from generation to generation, or you have a disorder that was triggered by a certain event, or you have a disorder or a problem that was triggered by societal expectations, such as eating disorders, I always share with my patients and clients the great news, which is you can change your brain. In some cases, for those of us who have anxiety, even though your brain might be firing away, setting off the alarm bells all day long, “Danger, danger, danger,” you can change the way your brain reacts to these misfires. Now, you can't do it by simply trying to change your thoughts. We know that. Changing thoughts sometimes can be very, very important. I'm not going to deny that. It's an important piece of depression work. It's an important piece of, like I said, eating disorder work and so forth for everybody. But the cool thing here is more importantly, by changing your behaviors, you can change your brain. By changing the way you react to fear, you can change your brain. You can connect parts of your brains that weren't connecting. You can strengthen parts of your brain that is weak or they're not connecting and the connection isn't so strong. Your brain can change, and this is good news. This is great news. When we found this out in science, we all had a big party because it was really reinforcing that if you do a scan of someone pretreatment of their brain, and then you did a scan of their brain post-treatment, we would be able to see the changes in their brain, and this is really cool. 2. If you have OCD or a phobia, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, social anxiety, health, anxiety, hair pulling, skin picking, and eating disorder, any of these, any of the mental health issues, that there is a science proven way to treat your disorder. This is good news. I fill you with hope by saying, I understand that what you're going through is really painful, but the good news is, we have scientific evidence to prove that we're on the right track and we're going to be administering the correct treatment. If you have OCD, the science proven treatment is exposure and response prevention. If you have hair pulling, skin picking or nail biting, the science proven treatment is habit reversal training. If you have depression or an eating disorder, the science proven treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy. If you have health anxiety, you're again going to have a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy with the focus being exposure and response prevention, same goes for phobias, same goes for social anxiety. All of these, we're going to, let’s say the frosting on top is that we're also going to apply science proven techniques, such as mindfulness and self-compassion. This is not woo-woo stuff here. This is science. We have tons of evidence to show that you can get better, that your disorder isn't a mystery. Thank goodness. Imagine back in the sixties if you had OCD, at that point, or even the seventies, there was no treatment for OCD that was proven. If you had OCD, you were told “Good luck.” A…
19 min
The Undifferentiated Medical Student
The Undifferentiated Medical Student
Ian Drummond
Ep 072 - PICU (and Entrepreneurship) with Dr. Arup Roy-Burman
This is another exciting conversation with a physician who is following a non-traditional career path! Dr. Arup Roy-Burman Dr. Roy-Burman is a pediatric intensivist (aka pediatric critical care specialist) and former Medical Director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Dr. Roy-Burman is now the CEO of Elemeno Health, which he cofounded in 2016. Dr. Roy-Burman completed his undergraduate degree at UC Berkley in 1989; completed his medical degree at UCSF in 1994; completed his residency in pediatrics at Stanford in 1997; and then returned to UCSF for a fellowship in pediatrics critical care (aka PICU fellowship), which he completed in 2000. After his fellowship, Dr. Roy-Burman took his first attending job at the Children's Hospital of Oakland eventually crossing the Bay to fill the role of Medical Director of the PICU at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in 2011, where he was also the Director of Transport, Access and Outreach. In this dual role of Medical Director of the PICU and Director of Transport, Access, and Outreach allowed Dr. Roy-Burman to interact with large swaths of the healthcare system from inpatient to outpatient and with all sub-specialities who consult in the PICU. With this experience of the inter-workings of the hospital system combined with his clinical understanding of patient care and provider pain points, he decided to co-found Elemeno Health, which received backing from famed accelerator and venture capital firm, Y Combinator. At a high-level, Elemeno Health is a SAAS (software as a service) company whose software aims to help push best-practices to front-line providers as well as capture feedback from these front-liners, thereby closing the "knowledge-practice gap." ***Medical students, residents and all interested parties:*** If interested in joining the Elemeno Health team, Dr. Roy-Burman would love to hear from you at info@elemenohealth.com! Please enjoy with Dr. Roy-Burman! P.S. We recorded this one in Dr. Roy-Burman's car on his drive from an investor meeting in Palo Alto back to his startup digs in Oakland, which makes for an interesting listen! Try to get through the first 5 minutes--the audio gets much better.
2 hr 6 min
Nursing Uncensored
Nursing Uncensored
Nursing Uncensored
The Role of a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner with Mackenzie Kane, MSN CNL RN
By request, Adrianne welcomes friend, fellow nurse, and colleague, Mackenzie. Mackenzie is a bedside nurse, clinical educator, and sexual assault nurse examiner, which is the role they’ll focus on today. If you have an interest in this area of forensic nursing, check out this episode. Mackenzie and Adrianne also discuss: -How Mackenzie became a 2nd-career nurse -Nerdy crimes -Burn and trauma nursing experiences -Experiencing major injury on the job -The role of a sexual assault nurse examiner -How to become a SANE -The ways we process trauma -The importance of debriefing For more information on forensic examinations read more here https://www.rainn.org/articles/rape-kit Johnson County Sexual Assault Response Team https://jcsart.nursing.uiowa.edu/ JC SART Insta https://www.instagram.com/jc.sart/ National Sexual Assault Hotline: Confidential 24/7 Support 800-656-HOPE (4673) https://www.rainn.org/resources Rape Victim Advocacy Program https://rvap.uiowa.edu/ ------------------------- Like this episode? Buy Adrianne a coffee to say thanks! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/NUPodcast Want more nursing-related content? 🎧🏥😷 Find more including the Nursing Uncensored podcast, blogs, videos, merch, and art at https://nursinguncensored.com Check out podcast merch at nursinguncensored.com/merch-shop Find Adrianne 💜 on the web linktr.ee/nursinguncensoredpodcast ———————— Recorded with Zoom and edited with Adobe Audition. ———————— Copyright-free music included in this episode found in the YouTube Audio Library: Find Your Way Beat - Nana Kwabena ------------------
59 min
The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland
The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland
Julie Bjelland
Being a Highly Sensitive Person While Black with Sydney James
From Sydney, "Being a Highly Sensitive Person has its own unique set of challenges and beautiful moments. When we factor in the added worldview of being a person of color, it changes the way in which we identify and relate to our sensitivities and sometimes we may not give ourselves permission to show up authentically. Join the discussion in identifying what may be hindering you from acceptance of your sensitive trait and tips on navigating the world as a highly sensitive person while black. I want my HSP audience to receive the message that they don't have to align with the narrative that sensitivity means weakness and can embrace that side of themselves if it's there." Sydney promotes healing, nurturing an authentic self-image and strengthening relationships in all that she does. Sydney is on a mission through The Sensitive Black Girl community to empower black women to embrace their sensitivity as a superpower and meet other women they can relate to. Sydney is also the owner of Black On Black Therapy, a virtual safe space supportive of sensitive souls, LGBTIQ+ affirming and social justice oriented. Sydney is a Highly Sensitive Black Woman herself and dedicated to continuing the conversation of the HSP trait in the black community. www.blackonblacktherapy.com Facebook.com/blackonblacktherapy & Facebook.com/thesensitiveblackgirl Instagram.com/blackonblacktherapy & Instagram.com/thesensitiveblackgirl Sydney also has a guide: The Workbook Guide To Managing Racial Fatigue For more information about The HSP Podcast, visit, HSPpodcast.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/julie-bjelland/message
47 min
PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast
PsychEd
PsychEd Episode 30: Anti-black Racism and Mental Health with Dr. Kwame McKenzie
Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers anti-black racism and mental health with Dr. Kwame McKenzie. Dr. McKenzie is an international expert on the social causes of illness, suicide and the development of effective, equitable health systems. He is a Professor of Psychiatry at University of Toronto and a staff psychiatrist and Director of Health Equity at the Centre of Addiction and Mental Health. The learning objectives: By the end of this episode, you should be able to… * Understand the history and legacy of racism and mental health in the black community * Understand the current state of racism towards black people and the impacts on their mental health. * Explore how healthcare workers can be anti-racist in providing mental health care and how the system can change to improve the mental health of black people. Host(s): Anita Corsini (social worker), Dr. Alex Raben (staff psychiatrist), and Rebecca Marsh (CC4) Produced by: Anita Corsini, Rebecca Marsh, Randi Wang (CC4), and Dr. Alex Raben Guest experts: Dr. Kwame McKenzie, staff psychiatrist Resources: Manual for Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for English-Speaking People of Caribbean Origin The City of Toronto has curated a list of Mental Health Resources for Black Communities. Organizations include: * Across Boundaries * Black Creek Community Health Centre * Caribbean African Canadian Social Services * Rexdale Community Health Centre * TAIBU Community Health Centre * The Black Health Alliance * Women’s Health in Women’s Hands Community Health Centre References: * Adelman, J. (2003). Study in Blue and Grey, Police Interventions with People with Mental Illness: A Review of Challenges and Responses [Ebook]. Canadian Mental Health Association. Retrieved 7 October 2020, from https://cmha.bc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/policereport.pdf. * Bailey, R. K., Mokonogho, J., & Kumar, A. (2019). Racial and ethnic differences in depression: current perspectives. Neuropsychiatric disease and treatment, 15, 603–609. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S128584 * Bor, J., Venkataramani, A., Williams, D., & Tsai, A. (2018). Police killings and their spillover effects on the mental health of black Americans: a population-based, quasi-experimental study. The Lancet, 392(10144), 302-310. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0140-6736(18)31130-9 * Bresnahan, M., Begg, M., Brown, A., Schaefer, C., Sohler, N., & Insel, B. et al. (2007). Race and risk of schizophrenia in a US birth cohort: another example of health disparity?. International Journal Of Epidemiology, 36(4), 751-758. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dym041 * Chakraborty, A., McKenzie, K., & King, M. (2009). Discrimination, ethnicity and psychosis — a qualitative study. Ethnicity And Inequalities In Health And Social Care, 2(1), 18-29. https://doi.org/10.1108/17570980200900004 * Fernando, S. (2014). Racism in psychiatry. In R. Moodley & M. Ocampo (Eds.), Critical Psychiatry and Mental Health: Exploring the Work of Suman Fernando in Clinical Practice (pp. 22-32). Taylor & Francis. * Kirkmayer, L. J. (2014). Critical psychiatry in Canada. In R. Moodley & M. Ocampo (Eds.), Critical Psychiatry and Mental Health: Exploring the Work of Suman Fernando in Clinical Practice (pp. 170-181). Taylor & Francis. * Kuper, A. (2018). Cultural Safety & Equity [Lecture PDF]. Retrieved from University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. * Maynard, R. (2017). Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present. Fernwood. * McKenzie, K. (2002). Does racial discrimination cause mental illness?. European Psychiatry, 17, 84. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0924-9338(02)80385-6 * McKenzie, K., & Bhui, K. (2007). Institutional racism in mental health care. BMJ, 334(7595), 649-650. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39163.395972.80 * MCRRT - St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton. (2020). Retrieved 7 October 2020, from https://www.stjoes.ca/health-services/mental-health-addiction-services/mental-health-services/coast/mcrrt. * Richardson, L. (2019). Diversity and Advocacy [Lecture PDF]. Retrieved from University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine. CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association. For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast) and Facebook. You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. For more information visit our website: psychedpodcast.org.
1 hr 5 min
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