Hidden Brain
Hidden Brain
Nov 23, 2020
Where Gratitude Gets You
Play • 52 min

Many of us struggle with self-control.  And we assume willpower is the key to achieving our goals. But there's a simple and often overlooked mental habit that can improve our health and well-being. This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with psychologist David DeSteno about that habit — the practice of gratitude. 

Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
ABC News
#319: How to Do Nothing | Jenny Odell
For an audience of meditators (or aspiring meditators), the idea of doing nothing shouldn’t be foreign. But, speaking from personal experience, it is very possible, especially for Type A people, to approach meditation with an agenda. In which case, sitting on the cushion can be very far from truly doing nothing. Enter Jenny Odell, who makes a very compelling case for truly… doing… nothing. In her work, she is challenging what for many of us, myself included, is a deep-seated and sometimes subconscious reflex: to constantly optimize and constantly be “productive.” She is a Lecturer in the Stanford Department of Art and Art History and author of the bestseller How to Do Nothing, which just came out in paperback. She comes to the subject of time from a very different perspective than our guest on Monday, Ashley Whillans. (If you haven’t listened to that episode, go do it; these two make a fascinating pairing.) In this conversation, Jenny and I talk about: letting go of our constant demand for productivity and learning to simply look around; the thrilling phenomenon of observing something so deeply that you actually cease to understand it; why moments of disgust, or even existential despair, can actually be quite instructive; and how to divest from what she calls “the attention economy”–and where to reinvest instead. Take a few minutes to help us out by answering a survey about your experience with this podcast! The team here is always looking for ways to improve, and we’d love to hear from all of you, but we’d particularly like to hear from those of you who listen to the podcast and do not use our companion app. Please visit http://www.tenpercent.com/survey to take the survey. Thank you. Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/jenny-odell-319
1 hr 3 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Orange Bat, Greenland Bacteria, COVID Anniversary, Alien Argument. Jan 22, 2021, Part 2
Orange Is The New Black—For Bats For a newly-described bat from West Africa, dubbed Myotis nimbaensis (mouse-eared bat from the Nimba Mountains), scientists are reaching for a different part of the color wheel. While Myotis does have some black on its body, the overwhelming majority of the bat’s fur is bright orange. A team of scientists from the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International stumbled on the new species while surveying populations of another endangered bat in the Nimba Mountains. It lives in abandoned mine tunnels in the northern part of the mountain range. As those aging tunnels are beginning to collapse, the researchers are working to build new bat-tunnels to help preserve the threatened species. Winifred Frick, chief scientist of Bat Conservation International, joins SciFri director Charles Bergquist to discuss the new species, and what’s being done to help protect it. Greenland’s Microbial Melt-Down The Greenland ice sheet covers nearly 700,000 square miles—three times the size of Texas. The ice sheet is estimated to have lost nearly 4 trillion tons of ice in the past three decades. A team of researchers recently investigated how the bacteria in the sediments on the ice sheet could be contributing to the melting of the ice. Their results were published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. Producer Alexa Lim talks to glaciology Asa Rennermalm about how the mix of bacteria and sediments can darken the ice, impacting how the ice sheet melts. Life Of A Coronavirus Scientist During A Pandemic Unfortunately, we’ve arrived at a grim pandemic milestone: One full year of a global health crisis. The first COVID-19 cases were reported in December 2019 by the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission. Last spring, we talked with three coronavirus researchers—Matthew Frieman, Andrea Pruijssers, and Lisa Gralinski—who discussed what the pandemic was like for them, including working in a BSL3 biosafety lab, and how their lives, and research, had been impacted. Ira checks back in with one of them, Matthew Frieman, to reflect on his experience in the last year, and what he expects for the coming year. Searching For Extraterrestrial Life Like ‘Sherlock Holmes’ Back in October 2017, our solar system received a strange visitor, unlike any seen before. Scientists couldn’t decide if it was an asteroid, a comet, or an ice chunk. To this day, it’s simply classified as an “interstellar object,” dubbed ‘Oumuamua.’ For his part, Harvard astrophysicist Ari Loeb is pretty sure what it is. It’s so hard to classify, he reasons, because it’s a byproduct of intelligent life outside our solar system. But how it found its way here is anyone’s guess. In his new book Extraterrestrial: The First Sign of Intelligent Life Beyond Earth, Loeb wants you to take the possibility of aliens seriously. He joins Ira to talk about his theory, how an early love of philosophy shaped his views as an astrophysicist, and why searching for extraterrestrial life is a little like being Sherlock Holmes.
47 min
Curiosity Daily
Curiosity Daily
Discovery
The Big Mistakes We Make in Virtual Gatherings (w/ Priya Parker)
Author Priya Parker explains how to fix the biggest mistakes you’re making in your virtual gatherings. Plus: learn about how language can affect the amount of pain a bilingual person experiences; and why the world’s largest waterfall probably isn’t what you think it is. Additional resources from Priya Parker: Pick up "The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It Matters" on Amazon: https://amzn.to/38sYHUN Listen to Priya Parker's New York Times Podcast "Together Apart": https://www.nytimes.com/column/together-apart Website: https://www.priyaparker.com/ Priya Parker on Twitter: https://twitter.com/priyaparker Priya Parker on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Priya-Parker-2108847152464229/ Bilinguals feel more pain in the language of their stronger cultural identity by Kelsey Donk Does your pain feel different in English and Spanish? (2020). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-11/uom-dyp113020.php  Gianola, M., Llabre, M. M., & Losin, E. A. R. (2020). Effects of Language Context and Cultural Identity on the Pain Experience of Spanish–English Bilinguals. Affective Science. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42761-020-00021-x  The World's Largest Waterfall Isn't What You'd Think by Mike Epifani World Waterfall Database. (2018). Worldwaterfalldatabase.com. https://www.worldwaterfalldatabase.com/  Jennings, K. (2012, November 26). Ken Jennings Finds the Biggest Waterfall in the World. Condé Nast Traveler; Condé Nast Traveler. https://www.cntraveler.com/stories/2012-11-26/underwater-waterfall-denmark-strait-maphead-ken-jennings  Wilcox, C. (2013, August 23). 16 Things BuzzFeed Doesn’t Know About The Ocean. Discover Magazine; Discover Magazine. https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/16-things-buzzfeed-doesnt-know-about-the-ocean  See How Antarctica’s Hidden Water Drives The World’s Oceans. (2015). Popular Science. https://www.popsci.com/meet-super-salty-dense-water-that-surrounds-antarctica/  Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://www.amazon.com/Curiosity-com-Curiosity-Daily-from/dp/B07CP17DJY See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
13 min
Nature Podcast
Nature Podcast
Springer Nature Limited
Hiring discrimination laid bare by mountain of data
Analysis of hundreds of thousands of job searches shows that recruiters will discriminate based on ethnicity and gender, and the neural circuitry behind a brief period of forgetting. In this episode: 00:47 Hiring discrimination A huge dataset has shown that widespread discrimination occurs in job hiring, based on ethnicity and gender. This backs up decades of research, showing that people from minority backgrounds tend to get contacted far less by employers. Research Article: Hangartner et al. 09:31 Coronapod Today Joe Biden becomes the next president of the United States. We find out what this new political chapter could mean for the country’s immediate pandemic response, including the mass rollout of vaccines. News: Joe Biden’s COVID plan is taking shape — and researchers approve News: Joe Biden names top geneticist Eric Lander as science adviser 20:46 Research Highlights A new way to study fragile helium pairs, and there’s no limit to how much exercise improves your heart health. Research Highlight: Taking tenuous helium molecules for a spin Research Highlight: Feeling fit? A little more sweat could still help your heart 23:17 Forgetful flies Ever had the feeling where you can’t quite remember what you were doing? While common, this sort of ‘tip of the tongue’ forgetting is not well understood. Now though, researchers have uncovered the neural process behind this feeling… in fruit flies. Research Article: Sabadal et al. 29:49 Briefing Chat We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the economics calculations of thieving monkeys, and how in certain situations electric eels will hunt together. The Guardian: Bali’s thieving monkeys can spot high-value items to ransom Science: Shocking discovery: Electric eels hunt in packs in Amazon rivers Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
37 min
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