KERA's Think
KERA's Think
Jan 21, 2021
QAnon: A Game That Plays People
Play • 48 min

LARP stands for Live Action Role Play, a gathering in which participants dress as kings, wizards and other fantasy characters to create new worlds. And understanding this activity could help explain something else that is very much real: QAnon. Reed Berkowitz, director of Curiouser LLC, a media, fiction and games research group, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how QAnon could be thought of as “a game that plays people.” His article from Medium is called “A Game Designer’s Analysis of QAnon.”

Encyclopedia Womannica
Encyclopedia Womannica
Wonder Media Network
Journalists: Mary Heaton Vorse
Mary Heaton Vorse (1874-1966) reported on the ugly underbelly of the industrialized working world. This month of Encyclopedia Womannica is brought to you by Macy’s. Macy’s is committed to honoring the gifts, voices and legacies of Black people throughout February and year-round. You can shop Black-owned businesses available at Macy’s at macys.com/honors, and head to that link to donate to a range of charities that empower Black youth. It's just one way Macy’s is demonstrating an ongoing commitment to inclusivity in everything they do. Every weekday, listeners explore the trials, tragedies, and triumphs of groundbreaking women throughout history who have dramatically shaped the world around us. In each 5 minute episode, we’ll dive into the story behind one woman listeners may or may not know -- but definitely should. These diverse women from across space and time are grouped into easily accessible and engaging monthly themes like Leading Ladies, Activists, STEMinists, Local Legends, and many more. Encyclopedia Womannica is hosted by WMN co-founder and award-winning journalist Jenny Kaplan. The bite-sized episodes pack painstakingly researched content into fun, entertaining, and addictive daily adventures. Encyclopedia Womannica was created by Liz Kaplan and Jenny Kaplan, executive produced by Jenny Kaplan, and produced by Liz Smith, Grace Lynch, Maddy Foley, and Brittany Martinez. Special thanks to Shira Atkins, Edie Allard, and Carmen Borca-Carrillo. We are offering free ad space on Wonder Media Network shows to organizations working towards social justice. For more information, please email Jenny at jenny@wondermedianetwork.com. Follow Wonder Media Network: * Website * Instagram * Twitter
7 min
The Pulse
The Pulse
WHYY
The Species We Save
Humans have long tried to mitigate their own destructive impact on the planet through conservation efforts. Often, those efforts are attached to one iconic species or another — the majestic bald eagle, cuddly cute baby seal, or awe-inspiring blue whale. But is this about them, or is it about us? On this episode, we take a closer look at conservation, and dig into the human motivations and emotions behind it. We hear stories about a near-extinct fish called the delta smelt — and whether it’s actually worth saving; how a weird-looking bird has sparked a battle over land in the American West; and how plucky raccoons carve out their own existence in cities. Also heard on this week’s episode: * Out in sagebrush country — a remote area of the American West — a strange and beautiful bird called the greater sage grouse has sparked a war over land. Reporter Ashley Ahearn explains why the grouse’s fight for survival has put it in direct conflict with humans, and how — and whether — compromise is possible. This story is excerpted from the podcast “Grouse.” * We talk with science journalist Michelle Nijhuis about what drives the conservation movement and the hard questions that not enough people are asking. Her book is called “Beloved Beasts.” * What can bird songs teach us about the origins of human language? Plenty, according to Erich Jarvis, a neuroscientist and molecular biologist who explores the neurobiology of vocal communication. We find out more in this preview of our new podcast extra series — subscribe to The Pulse to hear the whole interview and others like it.
49 min
The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond
The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond
Alison Monahan and Lee Burgess - Law School Toolbox, LLC
282: Listen and Learn -- Duty of Loyalty (Corporations)
Welcome back to the Law School Toolbox podcast! In today's episode, we're talking about the duty of loyalty owed by directors and officers of a corporation, and the main types of conduct they are prohibited to engage in. In this episode we discuss: * A review of the rule for duty of loyalty * The four types of prohibited conduct when the officer's interest is placed before that of the corporation * The situations in which a conflict of interest occurs * Usurpation of a corporate opportunity * Other topics that duty of loyalty is often tested with * Analyzing three hypos from California bar exam essays involving duty of loyalty Resources: * “Listen and Learn” series (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/law-school-toolbox-podcast-substantive-law-topics/#listen-learn) * California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, July 2015 (https://www.calbar.ca.gov/Portals/0/documents/admissions/gbx/July2015_CBXSelectedAnswers_EssayQuestions1-6_R.pdf) * California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, February 2009 (https://juraxbar.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/February-2009-CBX.pdf) * California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, February 2002 (https://juraxbar.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/February-2002-CBX.pdf) * Examples & Explanations: Corporations, by Alan R. Palmiter (https://www.amazon.com/Corporations-Examples-Explanations-Alan-Palmiter/dp/1454802472) * Podcast Episode 280: Listen and Learn – Piercing the Corporate Veil (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/podcast-episode-280-listen-and-learn-piercing-the-corporate-veil/) * Corporations 101 – A Quick Look at Upperclassmen Courses (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/corporations-101-a-quick-look-at-upperclassmen-courses/) Download the Transcript (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/episode-282-listen-and-learn-duty-of-loyalty-corporations/) If you enjoy the podcast, we'd love a nice review and/or rating on Apple Podcasts (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/law-school-toolbox-podcast/id1027603976) or your favorite listening app. And feel free to reach out to us directly. You can always reach us via the contact form on the Law School Toolbox website (http://lawschooltoolbox.com/contact). If you're concerned about the bar exam, check out our sister site, the Bar Exam Toolbox (http://barexamtoolbox.com/). You can also sign up for our weekly podcast newsletter (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/get-law-school-podcast-updates/) to make sure you never miss an episode! Thanks for listening! Alison & Lee
17 min
Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America
Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America
Ben & Jerry's and Vox Creative
Revisiting Reparations
In 1865, General William T. Sherman issued Special Field Order No. 15— a promise to redistribute 40 acres of once Confederate-owned land in coastal South Carolina and Florida to each formerly enslaved adult to begin mending the seemingly unmendable. It never came to pass. H.R. 40, also known as the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act, has been brought to Congress repeatedly since 1989, first by the late Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich), now by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex). Hear Jeffery Robinson, founder of the Who We Are Project and deputy director of the ACLU take on the past, present and future of reparations with veteran political activist Dr. Ron Daniels and legal expert and reparations advocate Nkechi Taifa. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Baldwin, James. The Fire Next Time. Vintage, 1992 Coates, Ta-Nehisi. “The Case for Reparations.” The Atlantic. June, 2014. Du Bois, W.E.B. Black Reconstruction in America 1860 - 1880. Free Press, 1999 Foner, Eric. Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863 - 1877. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2014. H.R.40 - Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act Lockhart, P.R. The 2020 Democratic Primary Debate Over Reparations, Explained. Vox.com, June 19, 2019 Marable, Manning. Beyond Boundaries: The Manning Marable Reader. Routledge, 2011. National African American Reparations Commission (NAARC) 10-Point Reparations Plan Taifa, Nkechi. Black Power, Black Lawyer. House of Songhay II, 2020.
33 min
Our Body Politic
Our Body Politic
Lantigua Williams & Co.
February 26, 2021: Senator Elizabeth Warren on what an economy should do, how Covid-19 vaccination protects others, and a new book confronts the stigma of intimate partner violence.
This week, Farai Chideya talks with Senator Elizabeth Warren about why she still pushes for student debt relief and an increased minimum wage, and why she believes these are racial-justice issues. Epidemiologist and Our Body Politic contributor Dr. Kavita Trivedi takes our most pressing questions about Covid-19 vaccinations. Film producer and author Tanya Selvaratnam discusses her new book “Assume Nothing: A Story of Intimate Violence.” Plus, our political roundtable with Errin Haines and special guest Brittany Packnett Cunningham, unpacks the racial resentment behind the aftermath of the January 6th insurrection, CPAC, and Senators’ grilling of the Biden-Harris Cabinet picks. EPISODE RUNDOWN 0:59 Senator Elizabeth Warren talks about how her personal experience growing up “on the ragged edge of the middle class” informs her view of our current economic structures 6:15 Black and Latinx students are disproportionately impacted by student loan debt, Senator Warren explains, which is why she says debt relief is a racial-justice issue. 12:11 Dr. Kavita Trivedi explains in detail what you need to know about the protection the Covid-19 vaccine provides. 15:39 The decline in Covid cases in the U.S. might be a hopeful sign as we aim for herd immunity, Dr. Trivedi says. 22:06 Tanya Selvaratnam discusses why she wrote her new book, “Assume Nothing: A Story of Intimate Violence.” 25:13 Selvaratnam says she talks about her experience with intimate partner violence to remove the stigma of being a survivor of abuse. 30:41 “Sippin’ the Political Tea” guest Brittany Packnett Cunningham talks about her podcast, UNDISTRACTED. 35:19 Errin Haines talks about the potential significance of Maya Wiley’s candidacy in the New York City mayoral race. 36:04 Haines says the idea of “electability” hampers many minority candidates, including Black women who run for office, but that “electing somebody is what makes them electable!” 37:56 Packnett Cunningham compares the lack of accountability for the January 6th, 2021, insurrection to decisions made in the post-Civil War era. 40:12 “I'm less worried about Donald Trump running for reelection than I am about a kinder, gentler, ready-for-prime-time Donald Trump to run,” Packnett Cunningham says, about why it’s important to hold the former President accountable for his role in the insurrection. 42:28 Packnett Cunningham says the real concern about elections should be around the unprecedented amount of voter suppression bills currently in state legislatures. 44:50 Farai Chideya says fear of revenge from historically oppressed minorities may be a factor in the higher scrutiny several Biden-Harris Cabinet nominees are currently facing in the Senate.
49 min
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