KERA's Think
KERA's Think
Jan 19, 2021
Where Do Biden And Trump Go From Here?
Play • 49 min

America is at a crossroads, and the way forward will depend greatly on two men: President-elect Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. Filmmaker Michael Kirk joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the roles each man will play in unifying a deeply divided nation. His Frontline documentary “President Biden” premieres tonight on PBS stations and his documentary “Trump’s American Carnage” premieres January 26 as part of Frontline.

The Pulse
The Pulse
WHYY
The Species We Save
Humans have long tried to mitigate their own destructive impact on the planet through conservation efforts. Often, those efforts are attached to one iconic species or another — the majestic bald eagle, cuddly cute baby seal, or awe-inspiring blue whale. But is this about them, or is it about us? On this episode, we take a closer look at conservation, and dig into the human motivations and emotions behind it. We hear stories about a near-extinct fish called the delta smelt — and whether it’s actually worth saving; how a weird-looking bird has sparked a battle over land in the American West; and how plucky raccoons carve out their own existence in cities. Also heard on this week’s episode: * Out in sagebrush country — a remote area of the American West — a strange and beautiful bird called the greater sage grouse has sparked a war over land. Reporter Ashley Ahearn explains why the grouse’s fight for survival has put it in direct conflict with humans, and how — and whether — compromise is possible. This story is excerpted from the podcast “Grouse.” * We talk with science journalist Michelle Nijhuis about what drives the conservation movement and the hard questions that not enough people are asking. Her book is called “Beloved Beasts.” * What can bird songs teach us about the origins of human language? Plenty, according to Erich Jarvis, a neuroscientist and molecular biologist who explores the neurobiology of vocal communication. We find out more in this preview of our new podcast extra series — subscribe to The Pulse to hear the whole interview and others like it.
49 min
Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California
Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at '60 Minutes'
Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. When he joined the "60 Minutes" team in June 1980, he knew he had reached the heights of TV journalism, and while there he helped break some of the most important stories in TV news history. Behind closed doors, though, was a war room of clashing producers, anchors, and the inimitable Mike Wallace. With surprising humor, charm, and an eye for colorful detail, Rosen delivers an authoritative account of the unforgettable personalities that battled for prestige, credit and the desire to scoop everyone else in the game. As Mike Wallace’s top producer, Rosen reveals the interview secrets that made Wallace’s work legendary, and the flaring temper that made him infamous. Rosen also shares his experiences as senior producer of "ABC News Primetime Live" and of "20/20", exposing the competitive environment among colleagues like Diane Sawyer and Barbara Walters, and the power plays among correspondents like Chris Wallace, Anderson Cooper, and Chris Cuomo. Join us for a master class on how TV news is made. MLF ORGANIZER George Hammond NOTES This program contains EXPLICIT language. MLF: Humanities SPEAKERS Ira Rosen Former Producer, "60 Minutes"; Author, Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60 Minutes In Conversation with George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on February 25th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California.
1 hr 13 min
The Takeaway
The Takeaway
GBH, PRX, WNYC Studios
Politics with Amy Walter: The Future of American Politics
After four tumultuous years of the Trump presidency, President Joe Biden promised to put the chaos behind him and return the country to normalcy. While dysfunction and partisan gridlock in Washington were amplified during Trump’s tenure, it existed long before he arrived. Even so, it’s clear that the political divide has become deeper and democracy is more vulnerable than ever. On the final episode of Politics with Amy Walter, Astead Herndon, national political reporter for The New York Times, Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, and Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker, join Amy Walter for a conversation about the future of American politics. One of the takeaways from the 2016 election was to constantly question our assumptions about voting behavior. Democratic dominance in the so-called Blue Wall states of the midwest is no longer assured and neither is the GOP hold on states like Arizona, Georgia, and Texas. Even so, the assumptions about demographics, specifically the role that race has on voting preferences, continue. For years, conventional wisdom suggested that higher overall turnout would result in more wins for Democrats. And while Biden won seven million more votes than Trump, he only carried the electoral college by around 40,000 votes. Record turnout helped Democrats win in Georgia, but it also helped Republicans hold onto vulnerable Senate seats in Iowa and North Carolina. Chryl Laird, assistant professor of government and legal studies at Bowdoin College, Julia Azari, associate professor of political science at Marquette University, and Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and democracy research at Pew Research Center, describe the nuances of the electorate and debunk the assumptions we make based on demographics. Politics with Amy Walter Theme: "Enter the Dragon" by J. Cowit is currently available for free here. Amy's Final Take I have had the great privilege and honor to host this show every week for the last 2 and a half years. And I am so very grateful to those who made this possible - WNYC, PRX, and the amazing team of professionals who work so hard on making sure that we get the best possible product on the air. Over the last few years, political reporting has become more about generating outrage than seeking to explain. Covering the loudest and most controversial voices, while ignoring those who are doing the work at keeping our democracy alive. The goal of this show was to be the opposite of all of this. We wanted to help people understand that politics wasn’t meant to be distilled in 140 characters. That curiosity is one of our most valuable - and under appreciated - assets. That doesn’t mean that I want politics to be neat and clean. It’s messy. And, that’s ok. The more voices in the mix mean that we are hearing from people whose stories were once left out of our political narratives. But, messy doesn’t have to mean dysfunctional. What we need more than anything in this moment is leadership. Instead of throwing up their hands and saying “well, it’s what people want” or “it’s what the market demands” leaders set boundaries and are willing to be unpopular for doing so. I also wanted every show to convey a sense of humility and empathy. To Accept that you don’t always have the answers or that sometimes the people you may not always agree with have some pretty good ideas. Covering this moment in American politics has been an amazing experience. Thank you for taking this crazy journey with me. And, while I won’t be at this microphone every week, I will be popping on every now and then to talk with Tanzina about politics and Washington. You can also catch me every Monday on PBS NewsHour or read my weekly column at CookPolitical.com. I leave you with this: our politics is only as broken as we allow it to be. Show up. Speak up. Listen more, shout less.
54 min
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