KERA's Think
KERA's Think
Dec 5, 2020
Introducing: Think Again With Krys
Play • 27 min

If you've ever wondered how Krys chooses who she talks to or what she wants to talk about, this is your chance to find out. Every weekend Krys will share highlights from the conversations she had that week and offer a behind the scenes look at the creation process of Think. On this week’s episode: The power of nature, searching out your people and the joy of the hunt.

The Takeaway
The Takeaway
GBH, PRX, WNYC Studios
Politics with Amy Walter: How President Biden Will Tackle the Economic Crisis
Joe Biden takes the helm as the 46th president of the United States during an unprecedented crisis. The coronavirus pandemic has killed more than 400,000 Americans, nearly 16 million remain unemployed, and the peaceful transfer of power was disrupted by a violent mob unleashed by the former president. Unity was the centerpiece of President Biden’s inaugural address, but he also acknowledged that unity cannot be achieved without addressing the division and anger that defined the last four years. Nick Fandos, congressional correspondent for The New York Times, Toluse Olorunnipa, national political reporter at The Washington Post, and Clare Malone, a freelance writer, reflect on the last four years and discuss President Biden’s path forward. The precarious nature of the economy is among the challenges President Biden has inherited. Record unemployment continues as major sectors of the economy remain shut down as a result of the pandemic. Having introduced a $1.9 trillion stimulus package ahead of inauguration, President Biden is hoping to bring Republicans on board to demonstrate his commitment to bipartisanship. But it’s unlikely that Republicans will support his plan as it currently reads even though distributing aid to suffering businesses and families is a time-sensitive matter. Heather Long from The Washington Post and Derek Thompson from The Atlantic describe the economy as it stands today and what approach President Biden should take in implementing another stimulus package. Plus, Kamala Harris made history this week as she became the first woman and woman of color to be sworn in as vice president. Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY’s List and author of "Run to Win: Lessons in Leadership for Women Changing the World," has spent her professional life working to elect pro-choice Democratic women to public office. She spoke with Amy Walter about how drastically things have changed for women in politics throughout her career and the magnitude of Vice President Harris’ ascent to the White House.
1 hr 1 min
Boston Public Radio Podcast
Boston Public Radio Podcast
WGBH Educational Foundation
BPR Full Show 1/22/21: Pushing Buttons
Today on Boston Public Radio: We open lines to talk with listeners about Gov. Charlie Baker’s latest easing of restrictions in Mass., and the slow rollout of COVID-19 vaccines here in the Commonwealth. Media maven Sue O'Connell discussed President Biden's latest executive order addressing Title VII protections for LGBT Americans, and weighs in on the planned appointment of Dr. Rachel Levine to assistant secretary of health. The appointment would make her the first openly transgender federal official to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate. Journalist and co-founder of The American Prospect, Robert Kuttner, discusses the state of America’s debt and why he’s not concerned about the impact of President Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus package on the country’s deficit. He also touches on pushback to Biden’s $3 trillion green infrastructure plan, and recaps his reporting on white supremacists hiding in law enforcement. Beat the Press host Emily Rooney talks about the Boston Globe’s new “Fresh Start” initiative, which’ll allow people to apply to have past coverage of them anonymized. She also discusses misinformation coming out of Fox News, and reads an inauguration-themed list of fixations and fulminations. Tech writer Andy Ihnatko talks about potential security concerns with President Biden having a Peloton bike in the White House. He also speaks about the legacy of outgoing FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, and offers tips on getting the best possible deal out of your internet or cable provider. Under the Radar and Basic Black host Callie Crossley talks about President Biden’s move to cancel former President Trump’s 1776 Commission, created in reaction to the New York Times’ 1619 Project. She also weighs in on Black business owners in Tulsa, Okla. who say they’re being priced out of a historic Black neighborhood, and news that former First Lady Melania Trump outsourced thank-you notes to her White House staff. We close out Friday's show by talking with listeners about the button in the Oval Office that summoned drinks for presidents Obama and Trump, asking: if you had a button that brought you anything, what would it bring?
2 hr 44 min
The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond
The Law School Toolbox Podcast: Tools for Law Students from 1L to the Bar Exam, and Beyond
Alison Monahan and Lee Burgess - Law School Toolbox, LLC
277: Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (w/Eve Rodsky)
Welcome back to the Law School Toolbox podcast! Today, we're excited to have Eve Rodsky on the podcast, who is an attorney and author of the book Fair Play. Through her research, she has developed a system for life-changing communication between partners, so that women can reclaim some of their time and live to their fullest potential. Join us for this episode to find out more! In this episode we discuss: * Eve Rodsky's background and the work she does * What Eve's book Fair Play is all about * What is "invisible labor" and can it be divided between men and women? * Are women better at multi-tasking than men? * Applying the concept CPE (conception, planning, and execution) to household management * The big shift in division of labor between spouses after having children * The Fair Play Card Deck that can help with rebalancing of domestic work so it's more fair Resources: * Eve Rodsky (https://www.everodsky.com/) * Philanthropy Advisory Group (https://www.philanthropygroup.com/) * Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution for When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live), by Eve Rodsky (https://www.fairplaylife.com/) * The Fair Play Deck (https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/647409/the-fair-play-deck-by-eve-rodsky/?aid=9490&linkid=PRHA7471D3EF7&pdivflag&ref=PRHA7471D3EF7) * Eve Rodsky – Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/everodsky/?hl=en) * Hello Sunshine: Fair Play (https://hello-sunshine.com/categories/fair-play) * The Fix: Overcome the Invisible Barriers That Are Holding Women Back at Work, by Michelle P. King (https://www.amazon.com/The-Fix-Overcome-the-Invisible-Barriers-That-Are-Holding-Women-Back-at-Work/dp/1982110929) * Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead, by Brené Brown (https://www.amazon.com/Daring-Greatly-Courage-Vulnerable-Transforms-ebook/dp/B007P7HRS4) * Invisible Work – article by Arlene Kaplan Daniels (https://www.jstor.org/stable/800538?seq=1) * William Ury (https://www.williamury.com/) * Dan Ariely (https://danariely.com/) * Podcast Episode 134: Strategies for Maximum Personal Productivity (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/podcast-episode-134-strategies-for-maximum-personal-productivity/) * Married Law Students: Lucky or Unfortunate? (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/married-law-students-lucky-or-unfortunate/) Download the Transcript (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/episode-277-fair-play-a-game-changing-solution-for-when-you-have-too-much-to-do-w-eve-rodsky/) If you enjoy the podcast, we'd love a nice review and/or rating on Apple Podcasts (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/law-school-toolbox-podcast/id1027603976) or your favorite listening app. And feel free to reach out to us directly. You can always reach us via the contact form on the Law School Toolbox website (http://lawschooltoolbox.com/contact). If you're concerned about the bar exam, check out our sister site, the Bar Exam Toolbox (http://barexamtoolbox.com/). You can also sign up for our weekly podcast newsletter (https://lawschooltoolbox.com/get-law-school-podcast-updates/) to make sure you never miss an episode! Thanks for listening! Alison & Lee
1 hr 4 min
KQED's The California Report
KQED's The California Report
KQED
The Search for California's Next Top Prosecutor Heats Up
Who Will be the Next California Attorney General?Other than Governor, being California’s Attorney General is arguably the most coveted political job in California. It makes you the Golden State’s top prosecutor, you get tons of attention, and the job can serve as a launching pad to higher office, like it did for Vice President Kamala Harris. The Attorney General’s position will soon be vacant and lots of people want the job. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED This will mean more regular beds and ICU beds at Pacifica Hospital of the Valley in Sun Valley. And the state is reopening Pacific Gardens Medical Center in Hawaiian Gardens, which had closed four years ago. Reporter: Jackie Fortier, KPCC San Jose Senator Dave Cortese says despite the fanfare around Newsom's goal to start re-opening next month, plenty of disagreements remain. That includes a proposal for weekly testing of students. Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED Just over three thousand inmates have gotten their first dose of the vaccine so far, but it still takes a few weeks for it to take effect. Health experts fear the worst is yet to come. Reporter: Marco Siler-Gonzales, KQED COVID-19 has spread like wildfire through California’s prisons and jails. To reduce caseloads and deaths, the state has prioritized certain groups of inmates for early release. Reporter: Lucy Copp The California Report Magazine: The History of 'Amazing Grace' and U.S PresidentsFor years, there’s been this link between Amazing Grace” and U.S. presidents all along the political spectrum. Reporter: Chloe Veltman, KQED
15 min
MPR News with Kerri Miller
MPR News with Kerri Miller
Minnesota Public Radio
White nationalism and the GOP
When Donald Trump declined to explicitly condemn white supremacy during the presidential debate last fall, it was the latest in the president’s long pattern of placating white supremacist groups. And during that same debate, Trump told the far-right Proud Boys to “stand back and stand by” — which quickly became the group’s new slogan. White supremacists led the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol, after being incited by Trump. In 2017, when a white supremacist rally turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Trump said there were “very fine people on both sides.” The Center for Strategic and International Studies found that attacks by far-right groups more than quadrupled between 2016 and 2017. But many experts say the seeds of white supremacy in the GOP were planted long before Trump — and some of it can be tied back to white Christians, a large base within the Republican Party. Friday, host Kerri Miller talked with two experts in white supremacy within the GOP. How did it get this bad, and is it possible to extricate the two? Guests: * Robert P. Jones is founder of the Public Religion Research Institute and the author of “White Too Long: The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity” * Simon Clark is a senior resident at the Center for American Progress studying far-right extremism and white supremacy. To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above. Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS
49 min
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
WNYC Studios
The Most Perfect Album: Episode 9
This season, More Perfect is taking its camera lens off the Supreme Court and zooming in on the words of the people: the 27 amendments that We The People have made to our Constitution. We're taking on these 27 amendments both in song and in story. This episode is best listened to alongside 27: The Most Perfect Album, an entire album (an ALBUM!) and digital experience of original music and art inspired by the 27 Amendments. Think of these episodes as the audio liner notes. In More Perfect's final episode of the season, listen to liner notes for two amendments that contemplate the still-unfinished status of our Constitution. "27" is an album that marks a particular point in our history: this moment when we have 27 Amendments to our Constitution. What will be the 28th? Maybe it will address our nation's capital. The capital has been a bit of a Constitutional anomaly for much of our nation's history — it's at the heart of the democracy, but because it's not a state, people in Washington D.C. have been disenfranchised almost by accident. The 23rd Amendment solved some of the problem — it gave D.C. the right to vote for president. But it left much of D.C.'s representation questions unanswered. D.C. still does not have voting representation in Congress. Instead, D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to Congress. For this liner note, More Perfect profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. The song for the 23rd Amendment is by The Mellow Tones, a group of students from D.C. high school Duke Ellington School of the Arts, along with their teacher Mark G. Meadows. The chorus, "Why won't you count on me?" reflects on the continued disenfranchisement of our nation's capital. The final amendment of the album, the 27th Amendment, put limits on Senators' ability to give themselves a pay raise, and it has arguably the most unusual path to ratification of all 27. The first draft for the amendment was written by none other than James Madison in 1789, but back then, it didn't get enough votes from the states for ratification. It wasn't until a college student named Gregory Watson awakened the dormant amendment centuries later that it was finally ratified. The 27th Amendment song is by Kevin Devine and tells Watson's story.
24 min
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