Here & Now
Here & Now
Oct 22, 2020
Theodore Roosevelt's Wilderness; COVID-19 Hits Family Farm
41 min
By the time he left the presidency, Theodore Roosevelt had saved an unprecedented 230 million acres of American land. A new book traces and deconstructs the positive and negative aspects of his crusading environmental leadership. We speak with the author. And, Denise Price of Louisville, Kentucky, says that she and several of her family members contracted COVID-19 in August and have since recovered. But her father unfortunately did not. We speak with Price about the experience.
In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
Lemonada Media
Toolkit Throwback: How to Talk to Each Other About Wearing Masks
On the day before Thanksgiving, let's listen back to In the Bubble's first-ever toolkit episode. The topic is, unfortunately, just as relevant today as it was when it first aired this summer: how to talk to people in your life who disagree with you about masks and social distancing. The panelists are Lanhee Chen, presidential health policy advisor to Mitt Romney, and United States of Care co-founder Natalie Davis.    Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.   Follow Natalie Davis @NatalieEPD and Lanhee Chen @lanheechen on Twitter.   In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/    Support the show by checking out our sponsors!   Livinguard masks have the potential to deactivate COVID-19 based on the testing they have conducted from leading universities such as the University of Arizona and the Free University in Berlin, Germany. Go to shop.livinguard.com and use the code BUBBLE10 for 10% off.   Check out these resources from today’s episode:    Face masks may have averted over 200,000 COVID-19 cases in the United States. Read more: https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20200616.817546/full/ Are you worried about your health and safety at work? Learn how to file an official OSHA complaint: https://www.osha.gov/workers/file_complaint.html Are you being treated unfairly on the job because of your race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, disability, age (age 40 or older) or genetic information? The EEOC may be able to help: https://www.eeoc.gov/federal-sector/filing-formal-complaint Protecting Civil Rights while responding to COVID-19: https://www.justice.gov/file/1271776/download   To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
45 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Roman Mars, Disinformation, Ancient Female Big Game Hunters. Nov 20, 2020, Part 2
Exploring The Invisible Architecture Of Cities With Roman Mars On a walk through your city or town, there are all sorts of sights and sounds to take in—big buildings, parks and patches of green space, roaring vehicles, and people strolling around. But according to Roman Mars, host of the 99% Invisible podcast, you need to look at the smaller, often unseen details to decode what’s really going on in the city. In the new book The 99% Invisible City: A Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design, co-authors Mars and Kurt Kohlstedt show that you can learn a lot about the place you live in by taking a closer look at tucked-away architecture and pavement markings. There’s meaning behind the etchings on the covers of maintenance holes and water lines, and the cryptic spray painted symbols on the street that signify network and telecommunication cables. These signs and structures can tell stories about a city’s past and present. Ira chats with Mars about the overlooked details built into our cities and how our urban environments are adapting to the pandemic. Big Tech Can’t Stop The Lies As the dust continues to settle from the 2020 presidential election, unfounded rumors persist about stolen ballots, dead people voting, and other kinds of alleged fraud—all without evidence. But as slow results trickle in, President-Elect Joe Biden has won by large but plausible margins, and investigations into the process have held up the results as inarguable. Anticipating a wave of misinformation, Twitter and Facebook both took unprecedented steps in the weeks leading up to the election to put election claims in context, marking questionable posts as misinformation. And yet large numbers of Americans continue to disagree about reality. How did this happen? And why have we seen so much of other kinds of misinformation this year—like anti-mask beliefs, or other COVID-19 hoaxes? Or take the QAnon conspiracy theories, all of which are completely baseless, yet somehow still spreading? Ira talks to New York Times reporter Davey Alba, and misinformation researcher Joan Donovan, about the patterns of media manipulation and how misinformation succeeds in our digital world. Ancient Big Game Hunters May Have Included Women In ancient hunter-gatherer societies, it’s been predominantly thought that men were the hunters and the women were the gatherers. This narrative has persisted for centuries. But researchers say the story might be more complicated. In Peru, a team of anthropologists uncovered a burial site containing 9,000-year-old remains of a possible female big game hunter. Their findings were published in the journal Science Advances. Producer Alexa Lim talks with one of the authors on that study, anthropologist Randy Haas from UC Davis, about what this can tell us about the social structure of hunter-gatherers.
48 min
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