Marketplace Tech
Marketplace Tech
Sep 23, 2020
AI is reshaping the way we buy, sell and value homes
6 min

The housing market continues to defy gravity. Sales of existing homes rose more than 10% last month compared to a year ago, hitting their highest level since December 2006. It’s all about low interest rates and intense competition for available homes. And now, more than ever, people are relying on online platforms to search for — and even buy — houses. And that opens the door for artificial intelligence to play a bigger role, like using computer vision to create real estate listings based on photos. Amy Scott speaks with Christopher Geczy, a professor at Wharton who teaches about real estate and insurance technology.

GeekWire
GeekWire
GeekWire
Scott Galloway on Amazon in a 'Post Corona' world
Amazon's big move into the pharmacy business last week wasn't a surprise at all, and it's just part of a larger plan to reinvent a trillion-dollar industry. Coming soon from Amazon: health insurance, predicts serial entrepreneur and NYU marketing professor Scott Galloway in his new book, "Post Corona: From Crisis to Opportunity." "Amazon knows a great deal about its best customers: what do they eat, do they buy exercise equipment or video games, do they have children, and are they in a relationship," Galloway writes in the book. "Between Amazon and Whole Foods purchases, the Amazon card, and all the 'pay with Amazon' merchants, the company has vastly more individualized data than any insurance actuary." That might sound like the makings of an Orwellian future, but it's just one of the ways that the crisis of the past year has rapidly accelerated the inevitable in the economy and society, as Galloway sees it. After going through years of change in a matter a months, he writes, the result will be a very different landscape on the other side. The book looks ahead to the day when we put this pandemic behind us and find that some of the most powerful companies in the world have only become more powerful, for better or worse for the rest of us. So where does that leave us? Scott Galloway joins us for a conversation about the "Post Corona" world on this episode of the GeekWire Podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
27 min
Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California
Trans Month Talks: Trans Wellness, Equity and Health
SPEAKERS *Remarks by London Breed* Mayor, City and County of San Francisco *Sasha Buchert* Senior Attorney, Lambda Legal *Nicky Calma (Tita Aida)* Social Activist; Co-Creator "Tita Aida," Filipino Task Force on AIDS *Clair Farley* Director, Office of Transgender Initiatives; Senior Advisor, San Francisco Mayor *Akira Jackson* Executive Director, TAJA Coalition; Member, Officer of Transgender Initiatives, Trans Advisory Committee *Maceo Perrson* Director of Communications and External Affairs, Office of Transgender Initiatives; Board Member, San Francisco LGBT Center; Member, Grant Making Panel, International Trans Fund *Jenna Rapues* MPH , Program Director of Gender Health SF, San Francisco Department of Public Health *Anjali Rimi* Co-Founder and President, Parivar Bay Area; Board Member, The LGBT Asylum Project, East Bay Stonewall Democrats, and San Francisco Pride; Member, The Trans Advisory Committee, Office of Transgender Initiatives *Aria Sa'id* Executive Director, Transgender District; Founder, Kween Culture Initiative *Nicole Santamaria* Executive Director, El/La Para TransLatinas; Fo-Founder, Collective Alejandria SV *Shannon* Trans Activist; Community Builder; Entrepreneur *Amy Whelan* Senior Staff Attorney, National Center for Lesbian Rights *Michelle Meow* Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show" on KBCW/KPIX and TuneIn; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors In response to the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, this program took place and was recorded live via video conference, for an online audience only, and was live-streamed by The Commonwealth Club of California from San Francisco on November 18th, 2020.
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
COVID-19 and the Boom in Multigenerational Housing
Among the most heartbreaking stories of 2020 are those coming out of assisted-living and independent-care facilities: stories of the virus spreading like a brush fire among vulnerable elders; stories of isolated seniors unable to receive loved ones as visitors for months at a time; or the recent story about the Minnesota National Guard being called in to serve at nursing homes because so many of the staff were sick. The pandemic should cause us to take a cold, hard look in the mirror at the way we have segmented our society — reminiscent of Euclidean zoning — by age, socioeconomic class, and other criteria. As our friend Gracy Olmstead wrote back in June: Yet we often like to see the various parts of our world as separate entities: churches, nuclear families, schools, grocery stores, office buildings, hospitals, assisted living centers and nursing homes, apartments and townhouses all subsist in detached zones...We approach our world like a machine: divorcing ourselves from every other part, pulling apart the various strands in the tapestry. Earlier this month, The Wall Street Journal ran an article about how the pandemic is giving the “multigenerational home business” a boost. While occupancy rates in assisted-living and independent-care facilities have seen their biggest drop ever, homebuilders say interest in accessory dwelling units has exploded. “Reluctant to send their elderly parents to senior-living facilities,” says the article, “some homeowners are building properties equipped to house extended family.” This article, and the rise of multigenerational housing, are the topics on this week’s episode of Upzoned. Host Abby Kinney, an urban planner in Kansas City, and regular cohost Strong Towns president Chuck Marohn talk about how nursing homes and other senior living facilities have been hit hard by the pandemic. They discuss why it’s critical that cities give homeowners and builders the freedom to be flexible with housing, including the flexibility to add or include accessory dwelling units. (In fact, the longterm survival of the suburbs may hinge on this flexibility.) They also discuss why it’s not helpful that the Journal article seemed to frame multigenerational housing as novel and upscale. Then in the Downzone, Chuck describes a work trip he took recently to Disney World and recommends a book by Strong Towns content manager John Pattison. And Abby talks about decorating for the holidays, including building a to-scale gingerbread replica of her house that we can’t wait to see pictures of. Additional Show Notes: * ”Covid-19 Is Giving the Multigenerational Home Business a Big Boost,” by Katy McLaughlin * “I just want to see people smile again.” by Chuck Marohn * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Further content from Strong Towns on ADUs and multigenerational living: * “Want a city that works for people of all ages? Take these 3 steps.” by Rachel Quednau * “The Livability of a Multi-Generational Neighborhood,” by Daniel Herriges * “The Isolation of Aging in an Auto-Oriented Place,” by Sara Joy Proppe * “If You're Going to Allow ADUs, Don't Make It So Hard to Build One,” by Daniel Herriges * “Making Normal Neighborhoods Legal Again,” by Daniel Herriges * “So You Want to Build an ADU?” by Aubrey Bryon
29 min
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