Money horror stories III: the ghost of purchases past
24 min

This Halloween, we have listeners’ spooky stories about good ideas gone bad, from giving a hormonal teen a debit card to getting into business with a scammer. Plus, a Backstreet Boys obsession that goes awry.

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
Lemonada Media
Following One Shift in the COVID-19 Unit (with ER Dr. Megan Ranney)
Dr. Megan Ranney recorded her shift in a COVID-19 ER in Rhode Island the day after Thanksgiving and was kind enough to talk to Andy about it. Though her job is both physically and mentally exhausting, she manages to remain hopeful. This is a rare look inside a hospital’s COVID-19 bubble.    For more of Andy's conversation with Megan, check out In The Bubble's Patreon page at www.patreon.com/inthebubble.   Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.   Follow Megan Ranney on Twitter @meganranney.    In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/    Support the show by checking out our sponsors!   Livinguard masks have the potential to deactivate COVID-19 based on the testing they have conducted from leading universities such as the University of Arizona and the Free University in Berlin, Germany. Go to shop.livinguard.com and use the code BUBBLE10 for 10% off.   Check out these resources from today’s episode:    Learn more about Get Us PPE, the group co-founded by Megan Ranney that’s getting personal protective equipment to those who need it most: https://getusppe.org/  Read about the field hospitals opening in Rhode Island: https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/11/30/metro/rhode-island-sends-alert-hospitals-reach-covid-19-capacity/  Check out the tweet Megan mentions from the night before her shift in the COVID-19 unit: https://twitter.com/meganranney/status/1332166999200456704  Learn more about Megan’s work with the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine, the country's only non-profit committed to reducing firearm injury through the public health approach: www.affirmresearch.org  Pre-order Andy’s book, Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response, here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165      To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
42 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Ig Nobel Prizes, Koji Alchemy. Nov 27, 2020, Part 2
Laugh Along At Home With The Ig Nobel Awards We know traditions are different this year. Maybe you’re having a small family dinner instead of a huge gathering. Maybe you’re just hopping on a video call instead of going over the river and through the woods. At Science Friday, our holiday tradition of broadcasting highlights from the annual Ig Nobel Awards ceremony is different this year too. Rather than being recorded live in front of a cheering crowd at Harvard’s Sanders Theater, the ceremony was virtual this year. But one thing remains the same—awards went to a bunch of genuine scientists for research that first makes you laugh, then makes you think. This year marks the ceremony’s 30th anniversary. Marc Abrahams, editor of the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research and master of ceremonies for the awards, joins Ira to talk about Ig Nobel history, and to share highlights from this year’s winners. Koji: The Mold You Want In Your Kitchen When chef Jeremy Umansky grows a batch of Aspergillus oryzae, a cultured mold also known as koji, in a tray of rice, he says he’s “bewitched” by its fluffy white texture and tantalizing floral smells. When professional mechanical engineer and koji hobbyist Rich Shih thinks about the versatility of koji, from traditional Japanese sake to cured meats, he says, “It blows my mind.” Koji-inoculated starches are crucial in centuries-old Asian foods like soy sauce and miso—and, now, inspiring new and creative twists from modern culinary minds. And Shih and Umansky, the two food fanatics, have written a new book describing the near-magical workings of the fungus, which, like other molds, uses enzymes to break starches, fats, and proteins down into food for itself. It just so happens that, in the process, it’s making our food tastier. You can grow koji on grains, vegetables, and other starchy foods, and make sauces, pastes, alcohols, and vinegars. Even cure meats. Umansky and Shih say the possibilities are endless—and they have the koji pastrami and umami popcorn to prove it. Plus, Urmansky and Shih share some of their favorite koji-inspired holiday dishes and leftover recipes—from turkey amino spreads to cranberry sauce amazake to soy sauce-infused whipped cream. Read more on Science Friday!
47 min
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