Ep. 420 — Sen. Mitt Romney
Play • 48 min

After failing to win the presidency in 2012, Senator Mitt Romney suggested he might be done with national politics for good. But after a move to Utah, the two-time presidential candidate, former Massachusetts governor and Bain Capital co-founder decided to run for the US Senate. He was elected in 2018 and has made his disdain for President Trump’s demeanor known, although his voting record shows he falls in line with his party more often than not. Sen. Romney joined David to talk about what it was like to cast the lone Republican vote for Trump’s impeachment, how Trump’s Covid response cost him reelection and why he is more concerned about the damage done by Trump’s actions in the lame duck period than by the delayed transition. 

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The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
Chuck Rosenberg, NBC News
Carrie Hessler-Radelet: Choose Optimism
Carrie Hessler-Radelet – a native of Michigan and the former Director of the Peace Corps – and her extended family have a remarkable and unique relationship with that storied organization. They hold the distinction of being the only Peace Corps family to have four generations serve as volunteers, including both of her grandparents, her aunt and her nephew. In fact, Carrie’s aunt, Virginia Kirkwood – who served in Turkey and was the 10,000th volunteer – inspired Carrie to join the Peace Corps. After her graduation from Boston University, Carrie and her husband served as Peace Corps volunteers in Western Samoa, where they taught at an all-girls school. Her story of their relationship with their host family – Losa and Viane and their nine children – is incredibly moving.   Part of that story includes a return visit to their host family while Carrie was Director of the Peace Corps – 32 years after she served as a volunteer in Western Samoa. If you want to understand how a volunteer can change lives in a remote corner of the planet, Carrie’s story is illuminating and inspirational. The Peace Corps is one the most popular, successful, and admired organizations in America. President John F. Kennedy, shortly after his inauguration in 1961, created the Peace Corps and called on volunteers to immerse themselves in another culture and another community, in every corner of the globe.    Today, these volunteers (of all ages), work side by side with local leaders, to tackle some of the most difficult and vexing problems on the planet – from health care, to education, to food security, to climate change. The men and women who serve in the Peace Corps are truly among America’s best, representing the best of America. In 2014, following her nomination by President Barack Obama, Carrie became the Director of the Peace Corps. As Director, she led an extensive organizational reform effort, most notably to enhance the health and safety of volunteers, including the development of a sexual assault risk reduction and response program. That, she will tell you, had a very personal component to it – as a young volunteer in Western Samoa, Carrie was sexually assaulted. When other victims came forward and shared their own stories with her, Carrie knew that the Peace Corps had to take decisive action to ensure the health and safety of its volunteers around the globe. Carrie’s description of the Peace Corps and the stories of service, humility, compassion and dedication among the volunteers – including a story Carrie shares about a volunteer named Peter – are inspirational. Carrie illustrates beautifully, why the Peace Corps plays such a vital role in America and around the world, and why we should always choose optimism. If you would like to learn more about this marvelous organization - which celebrates its 60th anniversary on March 1 of this year - you can visit its website at The Peace Corps. If you have thoughtful feedback on this episode or others, please email us at theoathpodcast@gmail.com. Find the transcript and all our previous episodes at MSNBC.com/TheOath
1 hr 18 min
Politics War Room with James Carville & Al Hunt
Politics War Room with James Carville & Al Hunt
Politicon
69: Impeachment Day... again w/ Professor Kathleen Belew & Walter Pincus
With the Capitol garrisoned with troops and the passions of insurrection and the subsequent defense of the Union still cooling, Al and James examine the worrisome situation we find ourselves in going into the Biden inauguration.  The threat is evident, and so they are joined by expert on the militia and white power movements, University of Chicago (https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/kathleen-belew) Professor Kathleen Belew (https://twitter.com/kathleen_belew) to look at how we got to this point, and national security expert and senior columnist for The Cipher Brief (https://www.thecipherbrief.com/experts/walter-pincus) , WaPo Alum Walter Pincus (https://twitter.com/walterpincus) to war game how best to handle the final days of the Trump Presidency. Get More From This Week’s Panelists: Professor Kathleen Belew Twitter (https://twitter.com/kathleen_belew) Website (https://www.kathleenbelew.com/) University of Chicago (https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/kathleen-belew) Author of the Bring The War Home: The White Power Movement & Paramilitary America (https://www.amazon.com/Bring-War-Home-Movement-Paramilitary/dp/0674286073) Walter Pincus Twitter (https://twitter.com/walterpincus) The Cipher Brief (https://www.thecipherbrief.com/experts/walter-pincus) Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/walter-pincus/) Email your questions to James and Al at  POLITICSWARROOM@GMAIL.COM (mailto:POLITICSWARROOM@GMAIL.COM)   or tweet them to @POLITICON (http://www.twitter.com/@politicon) .  Make sure to include your city, we love to hear where you’re from! THIS WEEK’S SPONSOR: MAGIC SPOON  GO TO www.MAGICSPOON.COM/WARROOM (http://www.magicspoon.com/WARROOM) TO GRAB A VARIETY PACK AND TRY IT TODAY!  BE SURE TO USE OUR PROMO CODE WARROOM (THAT’S ONE WORD) AT CHECKOUT TO GET FREE SHIPPING.
1 hr 32 min
In the Bubble: From the Frontlines
In the Bubble: From the Frontlines
Lemonada Media
Toolkit: What You Need to Know About the Variants
If you were worried that a new host would mean a completely different show, let this Monday Toolkit ease your fears. Dr. Bob poses your questions about the so-called UK and South African variants to virologist Angela Rasmussen and evolutionary biologist Paul Turner. You'll get answers about what the variants mean for the vaccines, how they affect kids, how to adjust your behavior in response to them, and much more.   Follow Dr. Bob on Twitter @Bob_Wachter and check out In the Bubble’s new Twitter account @inthebubblepod.   You can follow Andy in D.C. on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.   In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/    Support the show by checking out our sponsors!   Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NEJFhcReE4ejw2Kw7ba8DVJ1xQLogPwA/view    Check out these resources from today’s episode:    Here’s a link to CDC’s webpage on the new COVID-19 variants: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/transmission/variant.html  Check out this article about the CDC’s prediction that the UK variant could become the dominant COVID strain in the US by March: https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/coronavirus-variant-dominant-us/2021/01/15/4420d814-5738-11eb-a817-e5e7f8a406d6_story.html  Learn more about ‘The Swiss Cheese Model of Pandemic Defense:’ https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/05/health/coronavirus-swiss-cheese-infection-mackay.html Read about Andy’s temporary role in the Biden administration: https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/14/politics/andy-slavitt-biden-covid-team/index.htm  Learn more about Dr. Bob Wachter and the UCSF Department of Medicine here: https://medicine.ucsf.edu/    To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
43 min
Politics with Amy Walter
Politics with Amy Walter
WNYC and PRX
What Happens to President Trump's Grip on the GOP Following Two Impeachments?
President Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives just one week after encouraging his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol and disrupt Congress as they tallied Joe Biden’s Electoral College win. He is the first president to be impeached twice. Privately, many Republican members said that while they supported impeachment, they were worried about their physical safety and the political fallout from denouncing a president who remains popular among the base. Only ten Republicans joined House Democrats in voting to impeach. President Trump’s ban from Twitter means that for the first time in four years, Washington is unaware of how he’s processing the current news cycle and the end of his term. With President-elect Joe Biden days away from assuming the presidency, he’s preparing to tackle the dual crises of COVID-19 and an economic downturn. How quickly the Senate moves to take up impeachment will have a direct impact on how efficiently the Biden administration is able to move through their agenda. Annie Linskey, a national political reporter at The Washington Post, Anita Kumar, White House correspondent for POLITICO, and Sarah Wire, congressional reporter at The Los Angeles Times, share what the mood is like in the West Wing and what happens to President Trump’s grip on the Republican Party after he leaves office. Throughout his time in office, Donald Trump's actions have raised many questions about the presidency. Particularly, since he broke with America’s proud tradition of a peaceful transfer of power when his supporters attacked the Capitol. Today, a militarized Washington, D.C. stands prepared to address growing security concerns ahead of Joe Biden’s inauguration. Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia Miller Center, puts Donald Trump’s presidency into context and expands on how he changed the presidency, for better or worse. Also, the insurrection has highlighted the role social media platforms have in the dissemination of conspiracy theories and lies. Many of those who participated in the violent attack were involved in conversations on Twitter and Facebook that falsely claimed that the election had been stolen from President Trump. While Trump has been banned from several platforms, including Facebook and Twitter, the lies and rhetoric he shared with his followers has not disappeared. Darrell West, senior fellow at the Center for Technology Innovation at The Brookings Institution, and Kevin Roose, technology columnist at The New York Times, describe how individuals become radicalized online and where they go when they’ve been deplatformed.
53 min
Into America
Into America
MSNBC
American Coup
The storming of the Capitol building by white extremists loyal to Donald Trump on January 6th, was violent, deadly and shameful.     But it wasn’t unprecedented. The attempt to overturn Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election follows a long tradition in America of white violence, aimed at undoing Democracy.    At nearly every turn, where this country bent toward freedom, there was a violent backlash. And there is perhaps no clearer example than the story of the only successful coup in U.S. history.   In 1898, white supremacists in Wilmington, North Carolina carried out a riot and insurrection, targeting Black lawmakers and residents.   Inez Campbell Eason’s family survived the coup, but Black lawmakers were ousted, dozens of Black residents were killed, and she tells Trymaine Lee that the impact on the city is still felt.  Dr. Sharlene Sinegal-Decuir, African American History professor at Xavier University in New Orleans, explains the long history of white violence in response to progress. In order to prevent insurrections like the one last week in Washington, D.C., she says we must begin to understand our past.  For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.  Further Reading:  * White rioters at the Capitol got police respect. Black protestors got rubber bullets.  * Law enforcement and the military probing whether members took part in Capitol riot  * Democrats grapple with how to impeach Trump without hindering Biden's agenda
32 min
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