StarTalk Radio
StarTalk Radio
Oct 23, 2020
Baseball Physics, with Bill Nye
56 min

Bats, gloves, home runs, and… physics? Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the physics of baseball with Bill Nye the Science Guy, co-host Gary O’Reilly, and DJ Price, assistant coach at Barry University.

NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/baseball-physics-with-bill-nye/

Photo Credit: Keith Allison from Hanover, MD, USA / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

GrowCast
GrowCast
Jordan River
Grow Tips, Time Released Nutrients, SoCal Growing, and More, with Poetry of Plants
Long time talented cultivator Poetry of Plants finally joins the program for an episode about his journey, and what his garden has evolved into over the years! Poetry talks about his personal grow story, and describes the California grow scene that he came up in- as well as how it has changed and evolved over the years. He talks about balancing his other passions with growing, and emphasizes that growing is a life long journey that can weave in and out of your life path. He goes on to talk about some of his favorite products over his career, and has some amazing things to say about the new time release nutrients he is working with from Beanstalk Ag. Jordan shares some of his grow struggles and Poetry gives him some on air consultation, highlighting the finer points of climate control in a modern home grow setup. Be sure to follow @poetryofplants on IG where he shares his amazing work! ---Shane and MIGRO LEDs are offering GC listeners 5% off for a limited time at www.migrolight.com - use code growcast to save 5% and 5 code users will also win a FREE UVB supplement light! Upgrade your lights today at www.migrolight.com --- ---Remo Nutrients are top of the line nutrients made in British Columbia, PERFECT for you hydro growers! Find out more at www.remonutrients.com and pick them up in your local hydro store! Also, subscribe to UrbanRemo on YouTube for more cannabis content!--- ---New GROW TENTS at www.acinfinity.com use promo code growcast15 for 15% off the BEST grow fans in the game, and now high quality tents too!---
46 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Ig Nobel Prizes, Koji Alchemy. Nov 27, 2020, Part 2
Laugh Along At Home With The Ig Nobel Awards We know traditions are different this year. Maybe you’re having a small family dinner instead of a huge gathering. Maybe you’re just hopping on a video call instead of going over the river and through the woods. At Science Friday, our holiday tradition of broadcasting highlights from the annual Ig Nobel Awards ceremony is different this year too. Rather than being recorded live in front of a cheering crowd at Harvard’s Sanders Theater, the ceremony was virtual this year. But one thing remains the same—awards went to a bunch of genuine scientists for research that first makes you laugh, then makes you think. This year marks the ceremony’s 30th anniversary. Marc Abrahams, editor of the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research and master of ceremonies for the awards, joins Ira to talk about Ig Nobel history, and to share highlights from this year’s winners. Koji: The Mold You Want In Your Kitchen When chef Jeremy Umansky grows a batch of Aspergillus oryzae, a cultured mold also known as koji, in a tray of rice, he says he’s “bewitched” by its fluffy white texture and tantalizing floral smells. When professional mechanical engineer and koji hobbyist Rich Shih thinks about the versatility of koji, from traditional Japanese sake to cured meats, he says, “It blows my mind.” Koji-inoculated starches are crucial in centuries-old Asian foods like soy sauce and miso—and, now, inspiring new and creative twists from modern culinary minds. And Shih and Umansky, the two food fanatics, have written a new book describing the near-magical workings of the fungus, which, like other molds, uses enzymes to break starches, fats, and proteins down into food for itself. It just so happens that, in the process, it’s making our food tastier. You can grow koji on grains, vegetables, and other starchy foods, and make sauces, pastes, alcohols, and vinegars. Even cure meats. Umansky and Shih say the possibilities are endless—and they have the koji pastrami and umami popcorn to prove it. Plus, Urmansky and Shih share some of their favorite koji-inspired holiday dishes and leftover recipes—from turkey amino spreads to cranberry sauce amazake to soy sauce-infused whipped cream. Read more on Science Friday!
47 min
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