StarTalk Radio
StarTalk Radio
Oct 12, 2020
Cosmic Crib, with Rainn Wilson
47 min

He’s Dwight from The Office, he’s a climate activist, and he’s definitely a nerd. Neil deGrasse Tyson sits down with Rainn Wilson to explore acting, climate change, his new show Utopia, and the mysteries of the universe. 

NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/cosmic-crib-with-rainn-wilson/

Thanks to our Patrons Jennifer Sell-Knapp, Chris Reynolds, Nancy Umanzor, Daniel Rolandelli, Raymond Mang, Saad Algwaizani, Tyler Causey, and Christopher Lowther for supporting us this week.

Image Credit: Elizabeth Morris/Amazon Prime Video.

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Ig Nobel Prizes, Koji Alchemy. Nov 27, 2020, Part 2
Laugh Along At Home With The Ig Nobel Awards We know traditions are different this year. Maybe you’re having a small family dinner instead of a huge gathering. Maybe you’re just hopping on a video call instead of going over the river and through the woods. At Science Friday, our holiday tradition of broadcasting highlights from the annual Ig Nobel Awards ceremony is different this year too. Rather than being recorded live in front of a cheering crowd at Harvard’s Sanders Theater, the ceremony was virtual this year. But one thing remains the same—awards went to a bunch of genuine scientists for research that first makes you laugh, then makes you think. This year marks the ceremony’s 30th anniversary. Marc Abrahams, editor of the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research and master of ceremonies for the awards, joins Ira to talk about Ig Nobel history, and to share highlights from this year’s winners. Koji: The Mold You Want In Your Kitchen When chef Jeremy Umansky grows a batch of Aspergillus oryzae, a cultured mold also known as koji, in a tray of rice, he says he’s “bewitched” by its fluffy white texture and tantalizing floral smells. When professional mechanical engineer and koji hobbyist Rich Shih thinks about the versatility of koji, from traditional Japanese sake to cured meats, he says, “It blows my mind.” Koji-inoculated starches are crucial in centuries-old Asian foods like soy sauce and miso—and, now, inspiring new and creative twists from modern culinary minds. And Shih and Umansky, the two food fanatics, have written a new book describing the near-magical workings of the fungus, which, like other molds, uses enzymes to break starches, fats, and proteins down into food for itself. It just so happens that, in the process, it’s making our food tastier. You can grow koji on grains, vegetables, and other starchy foods, and make sauces, pastes, alcohols, and vinegars. Even cure meats. Umansky and Shih say the possibilities are endless—and they have the koji pastrami and umami popcorn to prove it. Plus, Urmansky and Shih share some of their favorite koji-inspired holiday dishes and leftover recipes—from turkey amino spreads to cranberry sauce amazake to soy sauce-infused whipped cream. Read more on Science Friday!
47 min
Comes A Time
Comes A Time
Osiris Media / Oteil Burbridge / Mike Finoia
Episode 21: Bill Walton
“I just love reading about adventure and about history, biography, about why people succeed in life. And one of the overriding themes on the path to success is that as we're all chasing this dream, that when we come to the hurdles, when it seems like it's not going to happen, when the adversity is just overwhelming and just crushing us, somebody, some complete stranger will just come into your life, then all of a sudden give you that little boost, give you the edge, hand you ten dollars, open his hand, come with me. And that and that is what the Grateful Dead is all about.” - Bill Walton In this episode of Comes a Time, Mike & Oteil are joined by the legendary former basketball player, sportscaster and beloved Deadhead, Bill Walton. Like the force of energy that he is, Bill takes the lead in the conversation, sharing stories about his mentors through his athletic career, the creative and exploratory environment of his childhood home, and finding purpose and possibilities through the Grateful Dead music and culture. Bill talks about his first Dead show in 1967 at 15 years old, when he says “I don’t remember how we got in, because we didn’t have any money, but somehow we got up to the front row, and I never left.” Bill unexpectedly (or perhaps, exactly as expected) turns the tables and interviews Oteil, at which point we go deep on Oteil’s singing career, transitioning between bands, camaraderie in Dead & Co, and the possibility of bringing his afro back. The three also discuss Oteil’s, Steve Martin’s and Jerry Garcia’s banjo playing. On a more serious note, but equally inspiring, we hear about Bill’s long and arduous journey of learning how to speak, starting at age twenty-eight, after suffering a lifelong speech impediment, for which he now coaches young people with the same issues.  Bill Walton was born in downtown San Diego. The family quickly moved to La Mesa, The Jewel of The Hills, where his Mom, Gloria, still lives, in the same house now, for 67 years. He exploded on the international basketball scene while attending Helix High School. Bill went to UCLA as a scholarship player for John Wooden, winning three successive NCAA Player of the Year awards and helping UCLA to consecutive undefeated NCAA championships (1972, 1973), and a record 88-game winning streak. Bill is a member of the NCAA All Time Basketball Team. Bill was selected as the #1 overall pick in the 1974 NBA Draft. Walton and the Portland Trail Blazers won the NBA Championship in 1977, earning the NBA Finals MVP award that season. He was the NBA MVP the next season. Bill won another NBA title, playing with the Boston Celtics in 1986. He was named the NBA 6th Man of the Year that season. Bill is a member of the NBA All Time Team. Walton was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1993. Bill is also in numerous other Halls of Fame, including the HOF of USA High Schools, The NCAA, the NCAA Academic All America, for UCLA, Pac-12, Oregon, San Diego, California, New England, the Boys & Girls Club, Guinness, and the Grateful Dead.    When Bill could no longer play basketball, he started a most unlikely career as a multimedia broadcaster, a career that has now spanned 30 years. Bill has worked for every major network and platform, and has been with ESPN for many years now. Bill is a multi-Emmy Award winning on-air talent. Bill is also a New York Times Best Selling author, with his memoir, Back From The Dead. Bill is a huge music fan, and with...   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 18 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu