Wizards and Critters
Play • 28 min

When it's Snakesgiving Time in the Mojave, everybody's just a little more careful. Goes well with these weird new times, being careful. So please make an effort to not run over any tortoises or coyotes or bobcats or gopher snakes when you're racing through the re-opened national park.

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Live Like the World is Dying
Live Like the World is Dying
Margaret Killjoy
S1E25 - Cici and Eepa on radio
Episode Notes Cici can be found on twitter @postleftprole. The IAF-FAI can be found on twitter @IAF__FAI and through their website iaf-fai.org. The Javelina Network can be found on twitter @JavelinaNetwork. The host Margaret Killjoy can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. You can support her and this show on Patreon at patreon.com/margaretkilljoy. For an overview of radio from an anarchist perspective, check out the zine For An Anarchist Radio Relay League. Transcript 1:32:19 SPEAKERS Margaret, Cici, Eepa Margaret 00:14 Hello, and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret Killjoy. Are use she or they pronouns. This week I'm talking with two people who have a lot of experience with different radio communications, mostly HAM radio and other means of two-way radio communications. Their names are Cici and Eepa and they work with the Indigenous Anarchist Federation and/or the Javelina Network which is a network of—well, they'll explain it. And we're going to be talking a lot about radio communications, and they actually do a really good job of breaking it down—a subject that could feel very technical. I know I get very overwhelmed when I try and understand radio communications. They break it down in a fairly non-technical way that, well, I'm excited for you all to hear. So this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero Network of anarchist podcasts. And usually I lead with a jingle, but this week I'm going to do something slightly different and first I'm just going to say welcome to the Maroon Cast. I don't believe they have a jingle yet. But there is a new podcast on the network called the Maroon Cast and it is absolutely worth checking out. And the jingle—they actually call it a commercial—that I am going to play is from the Institute for Anarchist Studies who are offering grants. And here's that. Hooray. Hey radicals, anarchists, and all of you liberatory leftists. Are you a podcaster, video maker, multimedia artist, or writer? The Institute for Anarchist Studies wants to let you know we have grants available for projects focusing on Black and Indigenous archaisms, police abolition and alternatives, and mutual aid. For details and how to apply visit anarchiststudies.org and click on the grants application post on our main page. That's anarchiststudies.org. Anarchist-studies-dot-O-R-G. Applications close January 31, 2021. Spread the word and tell your friends. Okay, so if y'all could introduce yourself with I guess your name, your pronouns, and then any political or organizational affiliations that makes sense with what you're going to be talking about today. Cici 02:32 So my name is Cici. I do she/her pronouns, I also do they/them pronouns. I don't really have any organizational affiliations at this time. I am—I have some experience with radio in a like a certain area, but in other areas I'm still learning and I'm trying to get up to speed. I am a licensed radio operator which helps a bit. But obviously, like, you don't have to be licensed to do stuff with a radio. And that's I guess enough about me. Eepa 03:13 All right, [I didn't catch a lot of this except Eepa] and I use he/him pronouns. My affiliations, I'm with the Indigenous Anarchist Federation and I'm a part of the newly formed Javelina Network. And basically, I am fairly new to the whole communication world. But it's one of those things that I've become very passionate about building up people's knowledge that way in communities for mutual aid, you know, both in disasters and just for general preparedness. We have ways of communicating that don't rely on, you know, corporate infrastructure or government infrastructure. Margaret 04:02 Yeah, so I guess one of the first things that I want to ask you all, for people who are, like—so this will probably be in some ways a slightly more technical conversation than some of the—some of my shows, just because, at least, there's an awful lot of acronyms and weird technical stuff that comes along with learning about radios. And I think it's worth—I'm going to ask you all a lot about that stuff. But I guess I was wondering if you all could start with kind of like a pitch for why we should care about radios. Like, we all have cell phones. Shouldn't we just use cell phones? Like what are some of the advantages of understanding and having an experience with radio communication? Eepa 04:40 So one of the things that people should consider whenever they're using—whatever type of communications you're using on a daily basis, that could be using email through ProtonMail or using Signal or WhatsApp, or just using your regular cell phone service—these are things things that are controlled by somebody. So the infrastructure that makes them possible is controlled by either corporations, or they're controlled by corporations and regulated by the government. They're subject to warrants and data collection and they're subject to a lot of other, you know, less security-related, but more just infrastructure in general. You know, if, as we saw in hurricane Maria, when hurricanes come they knocked down cell phone towers and if you don't have cell phone towers, your cell phone just becomes a, you know, a box with whatever photos you have on, it doesn't become very useful for communications. And the same thing goes for emails, when you are logging on to your, you know, ProtonMail account which is, you know, a great service and everything—if those servers go down in Switzerland, then you're out of luck—that that means that communication no longer exists. If the United States government decides to block a certain app that—that could basically cut off your service and take away all of your context. So it's a very fragile thing that we have, you know, during normal circumstances cell phone services is great, it's convenient. And honestly, it should still probably be your primary means of communication because of its ease of use. But there's a lot to be said for having all of the infrastructure you need to communicate in your own hands without needing any external infrastructure, aside from a community of other people who are likewise equipped and trained to communicate with. Cici 06:42 I think that's an excellent answer. In addition to what Eepa said I would basically just add on, like, yeah, there's—it's hard with the infrastructure that people usually use—cell phone towers, servers, routers, or at least, you know, commercially available routers and phones and everything. People don't have—people in, like, their communities don't have a lot of control over it. One of the things that I'm actually—I need to do way more study into it, because it's rather technical. But if something were to happen and the internet were to go down, either unintentionally, because—or, you know, not because of a—because like it's natural—something natural happens like a hurricane. Or because the government has shut the internet down for the express purposes of, you know, preventing people from communicating. One of the things radio can do is it can actually mimic a internet, I should—I may say mimic but it's actually a true internet protocol. So you can actually get an internet running up in your community. Those are the kind of things that I think radio is great for. I would echo what Eepa said where it's not really a—in terms of people saying, "Well, I have a cell phone what's, you know, what is radio offer to me?" I'd actually say, yeah, I don't think that just being able to say, "Hey, I communicated with somebody in another spot." Like, that's not really the attraction necessarily for learning a bunch of radio things. I would also note for a lot of people who are just doing off-grid stuff, there's a lot of places where your cell phone just, there's just no signal, it's too far away from cell phone towers. You can still get out with a radio…
1 hr 32 min
Weird Studies
Weird Studies
Phil Ford and J. F. Martel
Episode 92: Glitch in the Matrix: A Conversation with Rodney Ascher
With his latest film (http://www.aglitchinthematrixfilm.com), a meditation on what it means to believe we live in a computer simulation, Rodney Ascher has once again placed himself among the most innovative and visionary filmmakers working in the documentary form today. While the "Simulation Hypothesis" has been a hot topic ever since The Matrix came out in 1997, it is Ascher's ability to suspend judgement, training his camera on the experience of believers rather than the value of their beliefs, that makes A Glitch in the Matrix such a unique and significant exploration, a strange work of "phantom phenomenology." Weird Studies listeners will recall that Phil and JF devoted an episode to Ascher's films -- most notably Room 237 and The Nightmare -- back in the early days of the podcast. In this episode, Rodney Ascher joins them to discuss his cinematic vision, his take on the weird, and his thoughts on what is real and why it matters. REFERENCES Rodney Ascher (www.rodneyascher.com), American filmmaker -- A Glitch in the Matrix (www.aglitchinthematrixfilm.com) Jay Weidner's theories on Kubrick (http://jayweidner.com/the-kubrick-series-redrum/) Buddhist idea of the the Arising and Passing Away (https://www.dharmaoverground.org/dharma-wiki/-/wiki/Main/The+Arising+and+Passing+Away) [Dungeons & Dragons](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeons%26Dragons), tabletop roleplaying game James Machin, Weird Fiction in Britain 1880-1939 (https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783319905266) Magic Eye (https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/the-hidden-history-of-magic-eye-the-optical-illusion-that-briefly-took-over-the-world/) pictures Parmenides (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/parmenides/), Greek philosopher Wachowskis, [The Matrix](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TheMatrix)_ Alan Moore, "Superman: For the Man Who Has Everything" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For_the_Man_Who_Has_Everything) Conway's Game of Life (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conway%27s_Game_of_Life) Joshua Clover, The Matrix (BFI Film Classics) (https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/the-matrix-9781844570454/) Jonathan Snipes (http://www.jonat8han.com), American composer Clipping (http://www.itsclippingbitch.com), experimental hip hop band "Shining" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmkVWuP_sO0) romantic comedy recut Michael Curtiz (dir.), Casblanca (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034583/) John Boorman (dir.), [Point Blank](https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0062138/?ref=fnaltt2) Louis Sass, Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought (https://www.amazon.com/Madness-Modernism-Insanity-Literature-Thought/dp/0674541375) Special Guest: Rodney Ascher.
1 hr 27 min
Working Class History
Working Class History
Working Class History
E50: Working Class History the book
Podcast episode in which we talk about our new book, Working Class History: Everyday Acts of Resistance & Rebellion, with our friends at the Coffee with Comrades podcast, which they edited and put out as their episode 114. They kindly shared the audio with us, which we have lightly edited for brevity and include here as our latest episode. In it, we discuss the book, the WCH project, the nature of people's history, our approach to class and its intersection with other forms of oppression. Our conversation also touches on lots of stories of rebellion, including the fight for the weekend, and tea breaks, opposing the Ku Klux Klan, resisting the police and more. Copies of the first printing of the book are still available in our online store: https://shop.workingclasshistory.com/products/working-class-history-everyday-acts-resistance-rebellion-book And for our lovely patrons, depending on your level you may be entitled to a free e-book version ($10/month and up), paperback ($20/month and up) or hardcover ($50/month and up). For patrons at other levels you can get 20% off it and every other book in our online store using an exclusive discount code. Our podcast is brought to you by our patreon supporters. Our supporters fund our work, and in return get exclusive early access to podcast episodes, bonus episodes, free and discounted merchandise and other content. Join us or find out more at https://patreon.com/workingclasshistory Links Full show notes, links, acknowledgements and transcript here on our website: https://workingclasshistory.com/2021/02/09/e50-working-class-history-the-book/ This original episode on Coffee with Comrades: https://coffeewithcomrades.com/episode-114-history-from-below-ft-working-class-history More about Coffee with Comrades: https://coffeewithcomrades.com/ Follow them on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/coffeewcomrades Acknowledgements Thanks to you, our generous patrons for making this podcast possible. Special thanks to Conor Canatsey, Ariel Gioia, and Shae. Photo courtesy https://www.instagram.com/katyeross/
1 hr 7 min
Working People
Working People
Working People
Jennifer Bates
At this very moment, one of the most historic union drives of our era is taking place at the Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama. Around 5,800 workers at the facility, the majority of whom are Black, are currently voting on whether or not to unionize with the Retail, Wholesale, and Department Store Union (RWDSU). If they are successful, the workers in Bessemer would become the first unionized Amazon workforce in the United States, and Amazon is pulling out all the stops to keep that from happening. We got to sit down with Jennifer Bates, one of the fulfillment center workers in Bessemer, to talk about her working conditions and about why this union vote is so important. Additional links/info below... * Jennifer's Twitter page * BAmazonUnion website, Facebook page, Twitter page, and Instagram * RWDSU website, Facebook page, and Twitter page * Democracy Now!, "“David vs. Goliath”: Warehouse Workers in Alabama Fight Amazon for the Right to Unionize" * Alex Press, Jacobin, "The Alabama Amazon Union Drive Could Be the Most Important Labor Fight in the South in Decades (An Interview with Michael Goldfield)" * The Valley Labor Report, "February 6th 2021, Full Episode RWDSU Amazon Campaign Live" * Steven Greenhouse, The Guardian, "'We Deserve More': An Amazon Warehouse’s High-Stakes Union Drive" * Luis Feliz Leon, The American Prospect, "Union Solidarity on Eve of Historic Amazon Warehouse Election" * Kris LaGrange, UCOMM Blog, "Meet Amazon's Union Busters" * Jay Greene, The Washington Post, "Amazon’s Anti-Union Blitz Stalks Alabama Warehouse Workers Everywhere, Even the Bathroom" * Lauren Kaori Gurley, Vice, "Amazon Sends ‘Vote NO’ Instructions to Unionizing Employees, Tells Them to Use New Mailbox" Featured Music (all songs sourced from the Free Music Archive: _freemusicarchive.org_) * Jules Taylor, "Working People theme song" * Benjamin Banger, "June"
1 hr 14 min
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