Toolkit Throwback: How to Talk to Each Other About Wearing Masks
Play • 45 min

On the day before Thanksgiving, let's listen back to In the Bubble's first-ever toolkit episode. The topic is, unfortunately, just as relevant today as it was when it first aired this summer: how to talk to people in your life who disagree with you about masks and social distancing. The panelists are Lanhee Chen, presidential health policy advisor to Mitt Romney, and United States of Care co-founder Natalie Davis. 

 

Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.

 

Follow Natalie Davis @NatalieEPD and Lanhee Chen @lanheechen on Twitter.

 

In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/ 

 

Support the show by checking out our sponsors!

 

  • Livinguard masks have the potential to deactivate COVID-19 based on the testing they have conducted from leading universities such as the University of Arizona and the Free University in Berlin, Germany. Go to shop.livinguard.com and use the code BUBBLE10 for 10% off.

 

Check out these resources from today’s episode: 

 

 

To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.

 

Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com.

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg
Chuck Rosenberg, NBC News
Frank Figliuzzi: The FBI Way
Frank Figliuzzi grew up in southern Connecticut, but with his eyes and ears tuned to the nearby New York City media market and to enthralling stories of mob busting FBI agents. Those amazing tales made a big impression on a young Frank. As an 11-year-old, he wrote a letter to a senior FBI special agent, asking how he could one day join their ranks. To this day, he still has the personal reply that he received, encouraging him to pursue that dream. Back then, the FBI primarily hired attorneys and accountants to become special agents, and so Frank later went to law school, to polish his resume for the FBI. It worked, and in 1987, after graduating from the FBI Academy, Frank was assigned to the Atlanta field office, where he began a career working – among other things – counterintelligence cases.   In counterintelligence work, the FBI tries to identify and neutralize threats from foreign intelligence services that seek to steal our military, economic, and trade secrets. Our adversaries also attempt to recruit US persons and to turn them against our own country. In this episode, Frank describes the vital work he did in counterintelligence, including how his recruitment of a double agent from another country to assist the United States, came to a sudden halt when the FBI and the United States was betrayed by one of its own – Robert Hanssen – a disgraced former FBI special agent now serving a life sentence in a federal prison for espionage. It is a fascinating and disturbing story. Frank’s long and distinguished career in the FBI, took him to many different places – San Francisco, Washington, D.C., Cleveland. Among the most challenging posts he held was in the FBI’s Office of Professional Responsibility, where he imposed discipline – including dismissal – on men and women who violated the FBI’s strict code of conduct – decisions that were often agonizingly difficult but necessary to preserve the integrity of the organization. At the end of his FBI career, Frank ran the Counterintelligence Division of the FBI, and instituted important changes to ensure that intelligence analysts and special agents worked more closely together to protect our nation from relentless foreign adversaries. Frank was a thoughtful and principled leader and has written eloquently about his time at the FBI and about its core principles – such as compassion, credibility, and consistency – in his new book, The FBI Way. If you have thoughtful feedback on this episode or others, please email us at theoathpodcast@gmail.com. Find the transcript and all our previous episodes at MSNBC.com/TheOath
1 hr 12 min
Politics War Room with James Carville & Al Hunt
Politics War Room with James Carville & Al Hunt
Politicon
69: Impeachment Day... again w/ Professor Kathleen Belew & Walter Pincus
With the Capitol garrisoned with troops and the passions of insurrection and the subsequent defense of the Union still cooling, Al and James examine the worrisome situation we find ourselves in going into the Biden inauguration.  The threat is evident, and so they are joined by expert on the militia and white power movements, University of Chicago (https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/kathleen-belew) Professor Kathleen Belew (https://twitter.com/kathleen_belew) to look at how we got to this point, and national security expert and senior columnist for The Cipher Brief (https://www.thecipherbrief.com/experts/walter-pincus) , WaPo Alum Walter Pincus (https://twitter.com/walterpincus) to war game how best to handle the final days of the Trump Presidency. Get More From This Week’s Panelists: Professor Kathleen Belew Twitter (https://twitter.com/kathleen_belew) Website (https://www.kathleenbelew.com/) University of Chicago (https://history.uchicago.edu/directory/kathleen-belew) Author of the Bring The War Home: The White Power Movement & Paramilitary America (https://www.amazon.com/Bring-War-Home-Movement-Paramilitary/dp/0674286073) Walter Pincus Twitter (https://twitter.com/walterpincus) The Cipher Brief (https://www.thecipherbrief.com/experts/walter-pincus) Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/walter-pincus/) Email your questions to James and Al at  POLITICSWARROOM@GMAIL.COM (mailto:POLITICSWARROOM@GMAIL.COM)   or tweet them to @POLITICON (http://www.twitter.com/@politicon) .  Make sure to include your city, we love to hear where you’re from! THIS WEEK’S SPONSOR: MAGIC SPOON  GO TO www.MAGICSPOON.COM/WARROOM (http://www.magicspoon.com/WARROOM) TO GRAB A VARIETY PACK AND TRY IT TODAY!  BE SURE TO USE OUR PROMO CODE WARROOM (THAT’S ONE WORD) AT CHECKOUT TO GET FREE SHIPPING.
1 hr 32 min
The United States of Anxiety
The United States of Anxiety
WNYC Studios
How Martin Luther King, Jr., Changed American Christianity
And what MLK’s uniquely Black theology can teach us about the relationship between faith and politics in 2021. Rev. Dr. Yolanda Pierce, dean of the Howard University School of Divinity and author of the forthcoming book “In My Grandmother's House: Black Women, Faith, and the Stories We Inherit,” walks Kai through the history of the Black Church and Dr. King’s place in its evolution. And Rev. Dr. Jacqui Lewis, senior minister of Middle Collegiate Church, explains how her own ministry -- centered on love and inspired by King’s message -- attempts to build a new and diverse progressive movement. Her new podcast, Love.Period, debuts on Valentine’s Day. A special thanks to the New York City Municipal Archives and WNYC’s archivist Andy Lanset for audio recordings of Dr. King. COMPANION LISTENING: “In Jesus’s Name...We Legislate” (6/13/17) A court battle over LGBTQ rights in Mississippi reveals the segregationist history of the religious right’s effort to avoid anti-discrimination laws. “Dissent, Dissent, Dissent” (9/20/20) We reflect on the life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, including her political roots in a progressive, Jewish tradition. “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.
50 min
Politics with Amy Walter
Politics with Amy Walter
WNYC and PRX
What Happens to President Trump's Grip on the GOP Following Two Impeachments?
President Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives just one week after encouraging his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol and disrupt Congress as they tallied Joe Biden’s Electoral College win. He is the first president to be impeached twice. Privately, many Republican members said that while they supported impeachment, they were worried about their physical safety and the political fallout from denouncing a president who remains popular among the base. Only ten Republicans joined House Democrats in voting to impeach. President Trump’s ban from Twitter means that for the first time in four years, Washington is unaware of how he’s processing the current news cycle and the end of his term. With President-elect Joe Biden days away from assuming the presidency, he’s preparing to tackle the dual crises of COVID-19 and an economic downturn. How quickly the Senate moves to take up impeachment will have a direct impact on how efficiently the Biden administration is able to move through their agenda. Annie Linskey, a national political reporter at The Washington Post, Anita Kumar, White House correspondent for POLITICO, and Sarah Wire, congressional reporter at The Los Angeles Times, share what the mood is like in the West Wing and what happens to President Trump’s grip on the Republican Party after he leaves office. Throughout his time in office, Donald Trump's actions have raised many questions about the presidency. Particularly, since he broke with America’s proud tradition of a peaceful transfer of power when his supporters attacked the Capitol. Today, a militarized Washington, D.C. stands prepared to address growing security concerns ahead of Joe Biden’s inauguration. Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia Miller Center, puts Donald Trump’s presidency into context and expands on how he changed the presidency, for better or worse. Also, the insurrection has highlighted the role social media platforms have in the dissemination of conspiracy theories and lies. Many of those who participated in the violent attack were involved in conversations on Twitter and Facebook that falsely claimed that the election had been stolen from President Trump. While Trump has been banned from several platforms, including Facebook and Twitter, the lies and rhetoric he shared with his followers has not disappeared. Darrell West, senior fellow at the Center for Technology Innovation at The Brookings Institution, and Kevin Roose, technology columnist at The New York Times, describe how individuals become radicalized online and where they go when they’ve been deplatformed.
53 min
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