Munk Members-Only Pod: Episode 3
Play • 12 min

This is a sample of the Munk Members-Only Podcast. To access the full length episode consider becoming a Munk Member. Membership is free. Simply log on to www.munkdebates.com/membership to register. Under your membership profile page you will find a link to listen to the full length editions of Munk Members Podcast.

The Munk Members Podcast provides a focused, half-hour masterclass on current events with Janice Gross Stein, the founding director of the Munk School of Global Affairs and bestselling author. Rudyard Griffiths, Chair of the Munk Debates, is the podcast moderator. Janice and Rudyard unpack the big issues in the news and drill down into the people, events and trends that are shaping our lives in this extraordinary moment.

The full length episode digs into three big stories in the news this week — President Biden’s Inauguration address; will his calls for national unity have any effect on America’s polarized political institutions and discourse? — Biden’s Keystone XL pipeline cancellation; what are the implications for Canada’s energy dependent economy? Is a new national unity crisis in the making? — Canada’s Governor General resigns; are governments appointing people for their own communications proposes as opposed what important institutions actually need in terms of executive leadership? We debate.

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This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue.

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A Podcast Called INTREPID
A Podcast Called INTREPID
Stephanie Carvin and Craig Forcese
Ep 148 Review Review! Evaluating the First Reports from NSIRA and the Office of the Information Commissioner
In this episode, Stephanie and Leah sit down with Bill Robinson, Citizen Lab Fellow and one of Canada’s leading national security researchers, to discuss the first reports by two of Canada’s new intelligence review and oversight bodies, the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) and the Intelligence Commissioner (IC). The three make comparisons to prior reports produced by their predecessors (the Security and Intelligence Review Committee and the Office of the Commissioner of the Communications Security Establishment respectively). In some cases, they are left wanting for some of the detail of previous reports. While the trio sometimes dig into the weedy details in these reports, they do so in the context of an important question: Bill C-59 augmented the powers of the national security agencies on the understanding that this would be balanced by an enhanced review process – is that expectation being met here? Resources:  NSIRA, 2019 Annual Report ICO, 2019 Annual Report Check out Bill Robinson’s blog on the NSIRA report here: https://luxexumbra.blogspot.com/2020/12/first-nsira-annual-report-released.html For more information on some of the concepts in this episode, see Forcese and West, National Security Law, Safeguarding Information: Chapters 12-13; Review: Chapter 18 Online Course at a University Called INTREPID: National Security Law Primer, Module: Accountability; Module: Search 1 and 2; Module: Screen
59 min
The Strong Towns Podcast
The Strong Towns Podcast
Strong Towns
Joseph Kane: Prioritizing People (Not Projects) In Infrastructure Spending
As leaders in Washington, DC look to stimulate the American economy, one course of action with bipartisan support—as per usual—is to pour money into infrastructure. Yet as Strong Towns readers know, infrastructure spending often leads cities down the road of insolvency rather than prosperity, and not all infrastructure spending is alike. In a recent two-part policy brief, Joseph W. Kane and Shalini Vajjhala of The Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program wrote that “to truly improve the country’s infrastructure and help the most vulnerable households, federal leaders cannot simply throw more money at shiny new projects. Instead, they must invest with purpose and undo the harms of our legacy infrastructure systems.” They continued: “Above all, leaders should prioritize people over projects in our infrastructure plans. In practice, that means defining, measuring, and addressing our infrastructure challenges based on the needs of users of new and existing systems.” One of the authors of that brief, Joseph Kane, is the guest on this week’s episode of the Strong Towns podcast. Kane is a senior research associate and associate follow at the Metropolitan Policy Program. An economist and urban planner, his work focuses on wide array of built environment issues, including transportation and water infrastructure. In this jam-packed episode, Strong Towns president Chuck Marohn talks with Kane about the role infrastructure spending could play as part of the recovery agenda. Kane and Marohn discuss why “building back better” (President Biden’s phrase) doesn’t have to mean “build back new;” it could mean build back different, build less, and maybe even take down what we’ve already built. They also talk about whether an infrastructure bill in the trillions of dollars can address the nuances of what’s actually needed at the local level, whether Americans are more comfortable with catastrophic failures than the small ones that might teach valuable lessons along the way toward economic resilience, and about Kane and Vajjhala’s four strategies that can help undo the harms of “legacy infrastructure systems.” Additional Show Notes: * “Prioritize people, not projects: Addressing the harms of legacy infrastructure in the COVID-19 recovery,” by Joseph W. Kane and Shalini Vajjhala (Part 1) * “Four steps to undo the harms of legacy infrastructure in the COVID-19 recovery,” by Shalani Vajjhala and Joseph W. Kane (Part 2) * Joseph Kane (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Select Strong Towns content on infrastructure spending * “The more we build, the poorer we get,” by Charles Marohn * “A Better Use of Federal Infrastructure Spending” (Podcast) * “The Worst Possible Thing We Can Do with This Money” (Podcast) * “What Should My City Do About Our Infrastructure Backlog?” by Charles Marohn * “Would a $2 Trillion Infrastructure Spending Surge Promote Good Planning?” by Daniel Herriges
59 min
80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin
80,000 Hours Podcast with Rob Wiblin
The 80000 Hours team
#91 – Lewis Bollard on big wins against factory farming and how they happened
I suspect today's guest, Lewis Bollard, might be the single best person in the world to interview to get an overview of all the methods that might be effective for putting an end to factory farming and what broader lessons we can learn from the experiences of people working to end cruelty in animal agriculture. That's why I interviewed him back in 2017, and it's why I've come back for an updated second dose four years later. That conversation became a touchstone resource for anyone wanting to understand why people might decide to focus their altruism on farmed animal welfare, what those people are up to, and why. Lewis leads Open Philanthropy’s strategy for farm animal welfare, and since he joined in 2015 they’ve disbursed about $130 million in grants to nonprofits as part of this program. This episode certainly isn't only for vegetarians or people whose primary focus is animal welfare. The farmed animal welfare movement has had a lot of big wins over the last five years, and many of the lessons animal activists and plant-based meat entrepreneurs have learned are of much broader interest. *Links to learn more, summary and full transcript.* Some of those include: • *Between 2019 and 2020, Beyond Meat's cost of goods sold fell from about $4.50 a pound to $3.50 a pound.* Will plant-based meat or clean meat displace animal meat, and if so when? How quickly can it reach price parity? • *One study reported that philosophy students reduced their meat consumption by 13% after going through a course on the ethics of factory farming.* But do studies like this replicate? And what happens several months later? • *One survey showed that 33% of people supported a ban on animal farming.* Should we take such findings seriously? Or is it as informative as the study which showed that 38% of Americans believe that Ted Cruz might be the Zodiac killer? • *Costco, the second largest retailer in the U.S., is now over 95% cage-free.* Why have they done that years before they had to? And can ethical individuals within these companies make a real difference? We also cover: • Switzerland’s ballot measure on eliminating factory farming • What a Biden administration could mean for reducing animal suffering • How chicken is cheaper than peanuts • The biggest recent wins for farmed animals • Things that haven’t gone to plan in animal advocacy • Political opportunities for farmed animal advocates in Europe • How the US is behind Brazil and Israel on animal welfare standards • The value of increasing media coverage of factory farming • The state of the animal welfare movement • And much more If you’d like an introduction to the nature of the problem and why Lewis is working on it, in addition to our 2017 interview with Lewis, you could check out this 2013 cause report from Open Philanthropy. Producer: Keiran Harris. Audio mastering: Ben Cordell. Transcriptions: Sofia Davis-Fogel.
2 hr 33 min
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
When (If Ever) Should States Preempt Cities?
Strong Towns president Chuck Marohn has said that one change every city should make is to allow the next increment of development intensity by-right—i.e., single-family zoning would now permit duplexes, and so on. But if every city should make that change, does that mean states should come in and make that decision for cities—as Oregon recently did for cities with House Bill 2001? Not necessarily. This week’s episode of the Upzoned podcast is inspired by a recent article in Governing magazine called “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance.” In that piece, senior staff writer Alan Greenblatt describes how, over the past decade and across many issues, state governments have preempted local decision-making. For example, Texas, Arizona, Indiana and Louisiana are considering legislation that would prevent cities from reducing police or public safety budgets. Texas governor Greg Abbot went as far as to tweet: “We will defund cities that tried to defund police”. Yet as Greenblatt says, “If states are going to stop cities and counties from adopting their own spending priorities—no matter how misguided they may be—that raises the question of whether localities will be masters of their own fates or merely subservient branch offices of the state.” In this episode, Upzoned host Abby Kinney, an urban planner in Kansas City, and cohost Chuck Marohn talk about the trend of states preempting cities: When (if ever) should states step in to preempt local governments...and when does it become micromanaging? Using examples from California and Missouri, among other states, Chuck and Abby discuss where decisions should be made, the principle of subsidiarity, the consequences of “removing dynamism from the system,” and the rude awakening may experience when a tool (state preemption) used to push through a policy they like is later used to force a policy change they don’t. They also talk about those times when state preemption might make sense—and how they can be kept under control. Then in the Downzone, Chuck talks about a book he at least gave a shot. And Abby describes a recent homeowner’s scare involving frozen water pipes, a subsequent water leak, and an electrical box. Additional Show Notes * “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance,” by Alan Greenblatt * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Strong Towns content related to this episode: * “When should the state jump in to address local problems?” by Spencer Gardner * “Accessory Dwelling Units Rock. But Should States Be Overriding Cities' Laws About Building Them?” (Podcast) * “Do Property Tax Caps Help or Hurt Communities?" * “Mapping the Effects of California's Prop 13,” by Connor Nielsen * “The Local Case for Reparations,” by Charles Marohn
35 min
The Bar Exam Toolbox Podcast: Pass the Bar Exam with Less Stress
The Bar Exam Toolbox Podcast: Pass the Bar Exam with Less Stress
Bar Exam Toolbox
122: Listen and Learn -- Easements (Real Property)
Welcome back to the Bar Exam Toolbox podcast! Today, in an episode of our "Listen and Learn" series, we're discussing easements, which is one of the more common Real Property topics on bar exam essays. In this episode, we discuss: * Easements - the rule statement * Three important questions to consider when thinking about easements * The different ways in which an easement can be created * The two main types of easements * How an easement could end * Analyzing two Real Property hypos, from the July 2016 and February 2007 California bar exams Resources: * Bar Exam Toolbox blog (https://barexamtoolbox.com/bar-exam-toolbox-blog/) * “Listen and Learn” series (https://barexamtoolbox.com/bar-exam-toolbox-podcast-archive-by-topic/bar-exam-toolbox-podcast-explaining-individual-mee-and-california-bar-essay-questions/#listen-learn) * California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, July 2016 (https://www.calbar.ca.gov/Portals/0/documents/admissions/gbx/July2016_CBXSelectedAnswers_EssayQuestions1-6_R.pdf) * California Bar Examination – Essay Questions and Selected Answers, February 2007 (https://juraxbar.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/February-2007-CBX.pdf) * Podcast Episode 39: Tackling a California Bar Exam Essay: Real Property (https://barexamtoolbox.com/podcast-episode-39-tackling-a-california-bar-exam-essay-real-property/) * Podcast Episode 65: Tackling an MEE Real Property Essay Question (https://barexamtoolbox.com/podcast-episode-65-tackling-an-mee-real-property-essay-question/) * Podcast Episode 93: Listen and Learn – Constructive Eviction (https://barexamtoolbox.com/podcast-episode-93-listen-and-learn-constructive-eviction/) * Tackling Real Property MBE Questions (https://barexamtoolbox.com/tackling-real-property-mbe-questions/) Download the Transcript (https://barexamtoolbox.com/episode-122-listen-and-learn-easements-real-property/) If you enjoy the podcast, we'd love a nice review and/or rating on Apple Podcasts (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/bar-exam-toolbox-podcast-pass-bar-exam-less-stress/id1370651486) or your favorite listening app. And feel free to reach out to us directly. You can always reach us via the contact form on the Bar Exam Toolbox website (https://barexamtoolbox.com/contact-us/). Finally, if you don't want to miss anything, you can sign up for podcast updates (https://barexamtoolbox.com/get-bar-exam-toolbox-podcast-updates/)! Thanks for listening! Alison & Lee
18 min
Finding Genius Podcast
Finding Genius Podcast
Richard Jacobs
Cancer Genetics Research: The Latest in Highly Targeted Ways to Fight Back Against Cancerous Tumor Cells
Are customized cancer treatments a real possibility? Benjamin D. Hopkins, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Genomics and Genetic Sciences, Oncological Sciences, and the co-leader of the Functional Genomics Pipeline at The Tisch Cancer Institute. His cancer genetics research has developed an automated screening platform that can be used to identify tumor-specific drug sensitivities used for highly specialized cancer treatment. Tune in to learn more about: * Cancer genetics and genomes * What the ability to identify a drug resistance mechanism means for cancer treatment * The importance of the cancer research impact factor when searching for the most accurate information Dr. Hopkins focuses particularly on lung, breast, and pancreatic cancer, which is one of the 20% of cancers with no specific standard treatment plan. The Functional Genomics Pipeline as a whole screens cancer therapies to identify which types of patients with which types of tumors may be able to benefit from those therapies. Using cancer genome sequencing, it has become possible to identify tumor-specific vulnerabilities, which can then be exploited for cancer treatment purposes. This includes using one medication to sensitize tumor cells to another medication, as a way to reduce the collateral damage done to healthy cells during cancer treatment. Knowing exactly which mutational events are driving each specific tumor allows Dr. Hopkins and his team to target the specific mechanisms that tumor relies upon to thrive and multiply. This highly individualized approach in combination with public campaigns such as Breast Cancer Awareness month could lead to a future where cancer is considered a treatable disease across the board. For more information visit https://labs.icahn.mssm.edu/hopkinslab/ Available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/2Os0myK
44 min
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