Naked City
Naked City
Jul 28, 2020
The Walsh Street aftermath: Murder and betrayal
Play • 31 min

Part 2 of 2 - We take you inside the investigation, the witness betrayal and the bloody aftermath of the killing of two young police officers on Walsh Street in South Yarra in 1988. It was a war fought in Melbourne streets that left three suspects dead, two patrol officers murdered and led a respected investigator to take his own life.

John Noonan, the joint head of the Ty-Eyre taskforce, recounts the brutal slaying as well as the investigation and prosecution. The taskforce charged Victor Peirce, Trevor Pettingill, Peter David McEvoy and Anthony Farrell with the Walsh Street murders. With Victor's wife, Wendy Peirce was to be the star witness. She stayed in police protection for 18 months - at a cost of $2 million - but eventually refused to give evidence at the Supreme Court.

Peter "Bubble-Brain" McEvoy wasn’t so much a black sheep but a dark stain on his family. His brothers were prison officers. He was a rapist, armed robber and alleged police killer. He has always maintained his innocence, but his brother Geoff tells a different story.

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49 min
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