Naked City
Naked City
Sep 1, 2020
Sandy MacRae: 'This is Mildura, not Chicago'
Play • 22 min

Convicted of four murders, but suspected of many more, Alistair 'Sandy' MacRae could be one Australia's worst serial killers. He was a brothel boss, standover man, organised crime associate and small-time businessman.

He lured people to his property near Merbein in country Victoria with the promise of a drug deal, took their money, killed them and buried them on the property. In an interview with police, MacRae blames one of the killings on his girlfriend, saying she wanted to be a gangster, and that he told her 'this is Mildura, not Chicago'.

Suspected of being involved in the deaths of up to 15 prostitutes among others police think they may never know how many people Sandy MacRae actually killed.

 

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CLAREMONT: The Trial
CLAREMONT: The Trial
The West Australian
S2E103: THE SENTENCING: 'Coward' Edwards likely to die in prison
After 20 years of hiding in plain sight, sadistic killer and brutal rapist Bradley Edwards will likely never leave jail and die without his freedom, after he was sentenced to life in prison with a minimum non-parole period of 40 years. If he makes it that long, he will be 88, taking into consideration time served. But that just means in 2060 he can apply for parole, it doesn't mean he'll be released. As Justice Hall revealed his sentence, more than a year since his trial began and almost four years to the day since he was arrested, he told Edwards he would likely die in jail. "You committed these offences as a much younger man and have had the undeserved benefit of your liberty for many years due to the fact that it took many years to identify you as the perpetrator," he said. Those offences, he committed in his 20s, but one of his victims, who was 17 at the time bravely told of how the sadistic rapist's act 25 years ago changed her, but wouldn't define her. Her powerful words left even seasoned police officers holding back tears. “the definition of a coward," The Karrakatta victim said. “He preyed on weak, vulnerable young women who didn’t stand a chance." “How pathetic. It has been much easier in terms of impact to realise there was no evil genius at work here, he slipped through the cracks because he is unremarkable.” "And now I will leave this behind. I will leave this courtroom and finally go and live my life without you in it. I will live it joyously, respectfully and gratefully for myself, my family and for the lives that were lost. I will live and you won’t." "And as one of the victims of your crimes, I hope you are treated as well in prison as you have treated us." Even though he didn't give a life without parole sentence, Lee Rimmer, Jane's sister said he was happy, and WA Police Commissioner Chris Dawson spoke for a community. “It is my sincere hope, for the sake of the victims, for the sake of the families and friends and indeed for the safety of our community, that Edwards will never be released from prison,” Mr Dawson said. In this final podcast, Natalie Bonjolo, Tim Clarke, Alison Fan and Damien Cripps digest, analyse and take in the sentence - and the case that's gripped the state for more than two decades. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
49 min
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