Caught with their masks down
Play • 51 min

In a dark week for new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, a few high-profile politicians — mostly Democrats — have gotten a lot of attention for disobeying their own pandemic orders and restrictions. Of course, Republican leaders have been far from compliant (up to and including the White House), but is it especially egregious for Democratic leaders caught with their masks down? Are some Republicans unfairly getting a free pass because they have largely ignored the virus in the first place?

There was some better news this week: states are planning for imminent vaccine distribution. It’s a major task, and there are deep trust issues at play. In Washington, it looks like there’s bipartisan agreement on another coronavirus aid bill. The panel is hopeful that this is the beginning of more bipartisan action and a government that is more responsive to national crises.

Finally: more women than ever will take their seats in a new Congress and hold posts in the Biden-Harris administration. Is there reason for the Left to celebrate gains for Republican women representatives? The Biden transition team announced an all-woman communications team. How much does that choice matter? And how should that team restore the relationship between the White House and the press?

Keli Goff hosts this episode of Left, Right & Center with Margaret Hoover, host of Firing Line With Margaret Hoover, and Christine Emba, columnist at the Washington Post.

Stay Tuned with Preet
Stay Tuned with Preet
CAFE
Doing Justice Excerpt: “Long Shot Justice”
The fifth episode of Preet's new narrative podcast Doing Justice, an adaptation of his bestselling book, is out today! In this excerpt, former SDNY prosecutor Tatiana Martin and NYPD Detective Sean Butler built a federal case against the attackers of SuAnn, a sex worker who testified against her assailants.   NOTE: This episode contains graphic depictions of violence and sexual assault and may not be suitable for all listeners. Listen to the full episode for free here: cafe.com/doing-justice-podcast/episode-5-long-shot-justice Click here to subscribe to Doing Justice on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/doingjustice Click here to subscribe to Doing Justice on Spotify: spoti.fi/3rhiMUM Purchase the paperback of the bestselling book that inspired the podcast, Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law: doingjusticebook.com Doing Justice is produced in collaboration with Transmitter Media. This episode was written and produced by Shoshi Shmuluvitz. We had production help from Jessica Glazer. Our editor is Sara Nics and executive producer is Gretta Cohn. The executive producer at Cafe Studios is Tamara Sepper. And the chief business officer is Geoff Isenman. The reenactments of SueAnn’s testimony were voiced by Erin Nicole Lundquist. Meral Agish fact checked this episode. And Hannis Brown composed our original music and was our mix engineer for this series. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
6 min
Political Gabfest
Political Gabfest
Slate Podcasts
Let the Purge Begin
Emily, John and David discuss Republican allegiance to Trump, schools during COVID-19, and they're joined by guest Jonathan Cohn to look back on Obamacare and to explore the current state of COVID-19 vaccinations. Here are some notes and references from this week’s show: Susan Dominus for the New York Times Magazine: “Rhode Island Kept Its Schools Open. This Is What Happened.” Shawn Hubler for The New York Times: “Vaccinating Oregon’s Teachers Might Not Be Enough to Reopen its Schools.” The Ten Year War by Jonathan Cohn Here’s this week’s chatter: Emily: Anna Holmes for the Atlantic: “The Magazine That Helped 1920s Kids Navigate Racism” John: Radio Garden David: Pick of The Litter Listener chatter from Ming Richie: Cathy Free for the Washington Post: “This Man Mistakenly Left his Wallet in Antarctica. Some 53 Years Later, He Got it Back.” Slate Plus members get great bonus content from Slate, a special segment on the Gabfest each week, and access to special bonus episodes throughout the year. Sign up now to listen and support our show. For this week’s Slate Plus bonus segment, Emily, David, and John discuss the legacy of Rush Limbaugh. You can tweet suggestions, links, and questions to @SlateGabfest. Tweet us your cocktail chatter using #cocktailchatter. (Messages may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) The email address for the Political Gabfest is gabfest@slate.com. (Email may be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Frank. Research and show notes by Bridgette Dunlap. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
59 min
The Ezra Klein Show
The Ezra Klein Show
New York Times Opinion
A Radical Proposal for True Democracy
One thing I want to do on this show is give space to truly radical ideas, to expand the boundaries of our political and moral imaginations. And Hélène Landemore, a political scientist at Yale, has one of those ideas. She calls it “open democracy,” and the premise is simple: What we call democracy is not very democratic. The role of the people is confined to elections, to choosing the elites who will represent us. Landemore argues that our political thinking is stuck in “18th-century epistemologies and technologies.” It is not enough. We’ve learned much in the last few hundred years about random sampling, about the benefits of cognitively diverse groups, about the ways elections are captured by those with the most social and financial capital. Landemore wants to take what we’ve learned and build a new vision of democracy atop it — one in which we let groups of randomly selected citizens actually deliberate and govern. One in which we trust deliberation and diversity, not elections and political parties, to shape our ideas and to restrain our worst impulses. This is a challenging idea. I don’t know that it would work. But it’s a provocation worth wrestling with, particularly at this moment, when our ideas about democracy have so far outpaced the thin, corrupted ways in which we practice it. You’ve heard people say, “We’re a republic, not a democracy.” Landemore’s challenge is this: What if we _were _a democracy? We honor those who came before us for radically reimagining who could govern, and how politics could work. But did they really discover the terminal state of democracy? Or are there bold steps left for us to take? Recommendations: Liquid Reign by Tim Reutemann The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas The Principles of Representative Government by Bernard Manin Mortelle Adèle Book Series The Ezra Klein Show is hiring an Associate Producer! Apply to work with us by clicking here or by visiting www.nytco.com/careers. Thoughts? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com. New episodes every Tuesday and Friday. The Ezra Klein Show is produced by Roge Karma and Jeff Geld; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld.
45 min
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