The Case Of The Bogus Hydroxycholoroquine Study
30 min
A major medical journal reported that hydroxychloroquine harmed COVID patients, but a group of Twitter sleuths uncovered evidence that the paper wasn't what it seemed.
Axios Today
Axios Today
Axios & Pushkin Industries
The test of the electoral system
Two weeks ago, The Wayne County Board of Canvassers in Michigan met to certify the presidential election results and both Republican members refused. The two Democratic canvassers voted to approve the results. That meant it was a tie. A few hours later, the Republicans relented - there was another vote, and the certification happened. It wasn’t just these Republicans in Michigan. A Republican Secretary of State in Georgia, a Republican county supervisor in Arizona and Republican-appointed judges in Pennsylvania were among the state and local officials who ended up validating Joe Biden’s presidential win over Donald Trump in the presidential election. Did it all come down to these few people? Plus, President Trump wants to auction drilling rights in Alaska’s Arctic Wildlife Refuge. And, a new genealogy database dedicated to enslaved people and their stories. Guests: Noah Feldman, constitutional law professor at Harvard University, Axios' Ben Geman and Russell Contreras. Credits: "Axios Today" is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Carol Wu, Cara Shillenn, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Dan Bobkoff, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Alex Sugiura and Naomi Shavin. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. Go deeper: The walls close in on Trump Trump sets auction for Arctic refuge drilling rights before Biden takes office First look: Slavery ancestor project expands Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
11 min
Politics with Amy Walter
Politics with Amy Walter
WNYC and PRX
How the Media is Preparing to Cover the Biden Administration
President Donald Trump spent his first term undermining the credibility of the media. His tweets, campaign events, and press conferences were tools he used to cast doubt on the legitimacy of reputable news organizations while promoting unfounded lies and conspiracy theories that served his personal agenda. As President Trump prepares to leave office, members of the White House press pool have turned their gaze to President-elect Joe Biden. Due to the virtual nature of campaigning in 2020, Biden was able to avoid much of the traditional back and forth with members of the media. There are some who argue that members of the press didn’t push hard enough to get Biden in front of reporters. But because Biden has spent a considerable amount of time in Washington, he has a track record that he can be measured against. A core part of Biden’s campaign promise was a return to normalcy that would include a more traditional communications team and relationship with the press. Rick Klein, political director at ABC News, Caitlin Conant, political director at CBS News, and Ben Smith, media columnist at The New York Times discuss what the Biden administration’s relationship with the press could look like. Congressman-elect Ritchie Torres (D-NY) is a freshman member of the 117th Congress representing New York's 15th Congressional District. With the balance of the senate up for grabs come January, Congressman-elect Torres describes his expectations for his first months on the job. You can hear extended conversations with the newest members of Congress here. In January, Georgia will hold two runoff elections that will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate. To secure the majority, Democrats will need to win both seats. Gradual demographic change, particularly in metro areas like Savannah and Atlanta, have pushed this former Republican stronghold into the swing-state territory. At the same time, grassroots organizations, many of them led by Black women, have spent years organizing and registering voters - especially black voters. Among those organizers is Deborah Scott, executive director of Georgia Stand-Up. Her organization is working overtime to register voters ahead of the December 7th registration deadline in addition to making sure voters that participated in the presidential race vote in the runoff. In assessing how this once Republican stronghold has become a swing state, most of the attention has been on the influence of the state’s Black voters and white suburban voters. This makes sense given their share of the population. However, the fastest-growing group of voters in the state are Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. While they make up a significantly smaller share of the vote, their political influence can be seen at the congressional and statewide levels. An early analysis of the November elections by a Democratic firm found that voter participation by Asian American and Pacific Islanders in Georgia was up by 91 percent from 2016. Amy B Wang, a national politics reporter for The Washington Post, described the role Asian American and Pacific Islander voters played in 2020 and the role they might play during January’s special election.
50 min
In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
Lemonada Media
Following One Shift in the COVID-19 Unit (with ER Dr. Megan Ranney)
Dr. Megan Ranney recorded her shift in a COVID-19 ER in Rhode Island the day after Thanksgiving and was kind enough to talk to Andy about it. Though her job is both physically and mentally exhausting, she manages to remain hopeful. This is a rare look inside a hospital’s COVID-19 bubble.    For more of Andy's conversation with Megan, check out In The Bubble's Patreon page at www.patreon.com/inthebubble.   Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt and Instagram @andyslavitt.   Follow Megan Ranney on Twitter @meganranney.    In the Bubble is supported in part by listeners like you. Become a member, get exclusive bonus content, ask Andy questions, and get discounted merch at https://www.lemonadamedia.com/inthebubble/    Support the show by checking out our sponsors!   Livinguard masks have the potential to deactivate COVID-19 based on the testing they have conducted from leading universities such as the University of Arizona and the Free University in Berlin, Germany. Go to shop.livinguard.com and use the code BUBBLE10 for 10% off.   Check out these resources from today’s episode:    Learn more about Get Us PPE, the group co-founded by Megan Ranney that’s getting personal protective equipment to those who need it most: https://getusppe.org/  Read about the field hospitals opening in Rhode Island: https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/11/30/metro/rhode-island-sends-alert-hospitals-reach-covid-19-capacity/  Check out the tweet Megan mentions from the night before her shift in the COVID-19 unit: https://twitter.com/meganranney/status/1332166999200456704  Learn more about Megan’s work with the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine, the country's only non-profit committed to reducing firearm injury through the public health approach: www.affirmresearch.org  Pre-order Andy’s book, Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response, here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165      To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to www.lemonadamedia.com/show/in-the-bubble shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
42 min
Left, Right & Center
Left, Right & Center
KCRW
Caught with their masks down
In a dark week for new COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations and deaths, a few high-profile politicians — mostly Democrats — have gotten a lot of attention for disobeying their own pandemic orders and restrictions. Of course, Republican leaders have been far from compliant (up to and including the White House), but is it especially egregious for Democratic leaders caught with their masks down? Are some Republicans unfairly getting a free pass because they have largely ignored the virus in the first place? There was some better news this week: states are planning for imminent vaccine distribution. It’s a major task, and there are deep trust issues at play. In Washington, it looks like there’s bipartisan agreement on another coronavirus aid bill. The panel is hopeful that this is the beginning of more bipartisan action and a government that is more responsive to national crises. Finally: more women than ever will take their seats in a new Congress and hold posts in the Biden-Harris administration. Is there reason for the Left to celebrate gains for Republican women representatives? The Biden transition team announced an all-woman communications team. How much does that choice matter? And how should that team restore the relationship between the White House and the press? Keli Goff hosts this episode of Left, Right & Center with Margaret Hoover, host of Firing Line With Margaret Hoover, and Christine Emba, columnist at the Washington Post.
51 min
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