Drunk Mythology
Drunk Mythology
Nov 15, 2020
Ep 75 - Myth Illogical Interview Pt 1 - Amaterasu
Play • 51 min

We are joined by Nicole O’hara and Giada Fornello, some of the creators of Myth Illogical, an upcoming animated series dealing with Gods and Goddesses in the modern day and their struggle to stay relevant in the era of tik-tok and followers. We then share a story of sibling rivalry showdown: Amaterasu verses Susanoo. We see who the sore winner is and how Amaterasu inadvertently started the best party this side of ImmortalFest. More info about Myth Illogical can be found at www.mythillogicaltheseries.com

Drunk Mythology is a podcast created by Krista and Christian, recounting the feats and failures of world Mythology, with a few drinks along the way.

Strange Animals Podcast
Strange Animals Podcast
Katherine Shaw
Episode 208: The Happiest Animals in Australia
Thanks to Phoebe for suggesting the quokka and the wombat, two of the cutest, happiest-looking animals in Australia! Further Reading: Viral stories of wombats sheltering other animals from the bushfires aren't entirely true Satellites reveal the underground lifestyle of wombats Giant Wombat-Like Marsupials Roamed Australia 25 Million Years Ago Further Listening: Animals and Ultraviolet Light (unlocked Patreon episode) The adorable quokka with a nummy leaf and a joey in her pouch: Quokka (left) and my chonky cat Dracula (right) Some quokka selfies showing quokka smiles. That second picture really shows how small the quokka actually is: Wombats! A wombat and its burrow entrance: A wombat mom with her joey peeking out of the rear-facing pouch: Golden wombats. All they need is some Doublemint Gum: Two (dead, stuffed) wombats glowing under ultraviolet light: Show Transcript: Welcome to Strange Animals Podcast. I’m your host, Kate Shaw. This week we’re going to look at two super-cute animals from Australia, both of them suggestions by Phoebe. Thank you, Phoebe! Let’s start with the quokka. It’s a marsupial, which as you may recall means that it’s a mammal that gives birth to babies that aren’t fully formed yet, and the babies then finish developing in the mother’s pouch. It’s related to kangaroos and wallabies but is quite small, around the size of an ordinary domestic cat. It’s kind of a chonk, though, which means it’s probably closer in size to my big chonk cat Dracula. It’s shaped roughly like a little wallaby or kangaroo but with a smaller tail and with rounded ears, and it’s grey-brown in color. You may have seen pictures of the quokka online, because the reason it’s considered so incredibly cute is because it looks like it’s smiling all the time. If you take a picture of a quokka’s face, it looks like it has a happy smile and that, of course, makes the people who look at it happy too. Those are real pictures, by the way. Because of the way its muzzle and mouth are shaped, the quokka really does look like it’s smiling. This has caused some problems, unfortunately. People who want to take selfies with a quokka sometimes forget that they’re wild animals. While quokkas aren’t very aggressive and are curious animals who aren’t usually afraid of people, they can and will bite when frightened. The Nature Conservancy of Australia recommends that people who want to take a selfie with a quokka arrive early in the morning or late in the evening, since quokkas are mostly nocturnal, and that they let the quokkas approach them instead of following one around. Touching a quokka or giving it food or drink is strictly prohibited, since it’s a protected animal. The quokka lives on a few small islands off the coast of western Australia and a few small forested areas on the mainland. The largest population lives on Rottnest Island, and in fact the island was named by a Dutch explorer who thought the quokkas were rats. It means rat’s nest. The island’s actual name was Wadjemup and it was a ceremonial area for the local Whadjuk Noongar people. Only an estimated 14,000 quokkas live in the wild today, with most of those on Rottnest Island. It used to be much more widespread, but once white settlers arrived and introduced predators like dogs, cats, and foxes, its numbers started to decline. It’s also threatened by habitat loss. It reproduces slowly, since a female only raises one baby a year. A baby quokka is born after only a month, but like other marsupial babies, called joeys, it’s just a little pink squidge when it’s born. It climbs into its mother’s pouch where it stays for the next six months. Once it’s old enough to leave her pouch, it still depends on her milk for a few more months. While she’s raising one baby, though, the mother has other babies still in her womb ready to be born but held in suspended animation.
17 min
The Fat Feminist Witch
The Fat Feminist Witch
Paige The Fat Feminist Witch
Episode 85 - #WitchReads 2020 Wrap-Up!
Hi friends! Thank you for joining me today! It’s a chilly day and gigantic snowflakes are hitting my old windows while the cats snooze nearby and my coffee warms up my hands. It’s a perfect day to curl up with a good book – or 30. Today I'm talking about the books I was fortunate enough to read this year, and the ones I'm most excited about in 2021! Check out all my past book reviews on the blog! WitchReads 2021 Shelf on Goodreads.com 2020's books: Orishas, Goddesses and Voodoo Queens by Lilith Dorsey The Magic of Marie Laveau by Denise Alvarado Utterly wicked by Dorothy Morrison Hoodoo Cleansing and Protection Magic by Miss Aida The Junior Witch's Handbook by Nikki Van De Car Astrology for Real Relationships by Jessica Lanyadoo The Complete Book of Moon Spells by Michael Herkes The Moon Book by Sarah Faith Gottesdiener Water Magic by Lilith Dorsey Bewitching the Elements by Gabriela Herstik Pathworking the Tarot by Leeza Robertson The Magical Writing Grimoire by Lisa Marie Basile Finding Your Higher Self by Sophie Saint Thomas Thank you to my advertisers for this episode: Better Help - Want to get 10% off your first month of online counselling through Betterhelp? visit http://betterhelp.com/fatfeministwitch The Grimoire Journal: A Place to Record Spells, Rituals, Recipes, and More is available RIGHT NOW! >Order Here My first book - GREEN WITCHCRAFT: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO DISCOVERING THE MAGIC OF PLANTS, HERBS, CRYSTALS, AND BEYOND is now on sale! Get it >> HERE!
1 hr 1 min
The Classic Tales Podcast
The Classic Tales Podcast
B.J. Harrison
Ep. 715, The Queen of Spades, by Alexander Pushkin
Why won’t Tomsky’s 80-year-old grandmother share her incredible secret for gambling? Alexander Pushkin, today on The Classic Tales Podcast. Welcome to The Classic Tales Podcast. Thank you for listening. Thank you to all of our financial supporters. We couldn’t do this without you. We really try make your support worth your while. For a five-dollar monthly donation, you get a monthly code for $8 off any audiobook download. Give more, and you get more! It really helps us out, and gives us a revenue stream we can count on in this crazy time. And you help to keep the podcast going strong, so that more folks like you can discover the classics in a curated and easily accessible format. Go to classictalesaudiobooks.com today, and become a financial supporter. Thank you so much. App users can hear the poem “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud”, by William Wordsworth in the special features for today’s episode. Today we return to Russia, and Alexander Pushkin. He was born to a noble family, but by the time he came along, most of the money was gone. He is one of the great Russian luminaries, and today’s story of self-destructive greed is largely reprinted and anthologized. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky made it into an opera which premiered in St. Petersburg in 1890. Faro, spelled in the story as f-a-r-o, is a gambling card game in which players bet on the order in which the cards will appear. Pharoah, like the Egyptian Pharoah, is said to have been the name of the king of hearts. And now, The Queen of Spades, by Alexander Pushkin. Tap here to go to www.classictalesaudiobooks.com and become a financial supporter! Tap here to go to our merchandise store!
30 min
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