CM 179: Marissa King On Feeling Good About Networking
Play • 48 min
For most of us, networking is a topic that brings up a lot of strong feelings. And most of those feelings aren't all that positive.

Ultimately, we know we should network. But just thinking about it can make us uncomfortable. In fact, research shows that many of us associate networking with something dirty. On top of that, we feel guilty for not devoting more time to it.

That's why I wanted to interview Marissa King. Author of the book, Social Chemistry: Decoding the Elements of Human Connection, Marissa is Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management and an expert on social networks.

Marissa's take on networking is refreshing because she emphasizes the relational aspect. She also provides tools for gauging how we network, so that we can easily see how well our approach is working.

Her discussion of networking and her strategies for how to reframe it more positively help us to walk away without feeling icky. At the same time, her tips inspire us to tend to our professional network the way we would our personal one.

If you're looking for a fresh take on networking, I think you'll enjoy hearing what Marissa has to say. 

Episode Links

Shout-out to Heather Cox Richardson for her Letters from an American

Professional Networking Makes People Feel Dirty by Carmen Nobel

Do People Mix at Mixers? by Paul Ingram and Michael W. Morris

Marissa King's site for assessing your networking approach as convener, broker, or expansionist

Self-monitoring

How to Build a Better Social Network and the work of Ronald Burt

Why Do People Gossip? by Sophia Gottfried and the work of Robin Dunbar

Yo-Yo Ma and Silkroad

Homophily

Heidi Roizen

Curious Minds at Work Team

You can learn more about creator and host, Gayle Allen, and producer and editor, Rob Mancabelli, here.

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The SuperHuman Academy Podcast
The SuperHuman Academy Podcast
Jonathan Levi
Ep. 300: Finale Episode & Thank You
Greetings, Superfriends, and welcome to the 300th episode of the SuperHuman Academy Podcast - where, as you’ve probably already heard me mention in previous episodes, after nearly 6 years and 4.5 million downloads - it is my duty to inform you that this episode will be our last - at least for now. In this final chapter, I want to take a few moments to answer some of your questions, share with you how I’ve come to this decision, and let you all know what you can expect from me in the future. The first question that’s probably on everybody’s mind, I imagine, is this: Why would you stop a successful podcast? If you’ve been paying attention, you know that podcasting is at its all-time peak right now, with just about everybody in every market you can imagine getting into the medium. And it’s only expected to grow, with people consuming more and more podcasts every single year. Of course, a lot of these new shows are destined to be part of “the long tail” - never crossing more than a thousand downloads per episode. But SuperHuman Academy, since its inception, has been a reasonably successful show - earning thousands of downloads per episode consistently throughout its 6-year run. Add to this the fact that some of our best and most interesting guests and episodes have come out in just the last year - with quite a few “superstar” guests and life-changing episodes happening in 2020. Why, then, have I decided to bring all of this to a close?! In truth, there are a lot of reasons. First, there’s the “family” component. My wife and I just had our baby boy, and I’ve made the decision to clear off most of my calendar for a while to focus exclusively on this exciting and rewarding new adventure. The fact that I have the freedom to do this is a major blessing that I realize not many people enjoy - and I intend to take full advantage of it. But, as you can imagine, there is much more to the story than that. You see, when I first started this business - with nothing more than a simple Udemy course recorded with a webcam, it was intended to be a fun “side project” - a way to give back and earn a living while I searched for “the next big thing.” I could have never anticipated that I would be where I am today, employing a full team, with over 300,000 students worldwide, bestselling books, a successful podcast, certified coaches all over the world, etc. What was intended to be a fun, lifestyle-oriented “side business” in many ways became a runaway success - and my main focus for the better part of 7 years. All of that is well and good - I have no regrets whatsoever, and of course I consider myself extremely blessed for everything this journey has done for me and for those I’ve touched along the way. But, in all truth, somewhere between then and now, I lost sight of what was important to me. 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This same thing happened to me in my last business, a luxury car parts internet retailer that I grew to seven figures - and then sold after 7 years. Whereas I used to be obsessed with cars and learning everything there was to learn about them, towards the end, I was so burnt out that I wanted nothing to do with them. Only now, 9 years later, have I rediscovered that passion and enthusiasm I once had as a kid. So now, you must be wondering: What’s Next? I mean, from the sound of it, you might be worried that I’m going to pack up and leave, shut down or sell my website, and disappear into the sunset - much like I did when I left the aftermarket automotive industry. Not to worry. I’m not going anywhere - at least not right now. After all, a huge part of why I do all this is a feeling of responsibility. 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16 min
Unbiased Science
Unbiased Science
Vital Statistics Consulting
Not Throwin' Away My Shot: COVID-19 Vaccine Manufacturing and Deployment
On this week’s podcast episode, we get back to COVID-19 vaccine discussions, but with a different angle: focusing on the vaccine manufacturing, development, and deployment pipelines. We start with the U.S. and global statistics for vaccination rates, and then focus on a discussion of the parameters that impact the access to vaccines for countries around the world. We summarize the currently utilized vaccines globally and which countries are utilizing them, before focusing on the bottlenecks through the entire vaccine deployment process. We focus on bottlenecks encountered in manufacturing and supply chain of raw materials, bottlenecks with regard to personnel needed across all phases of a vaccination campaign, and bottlenecks involved with distribution and storage. We discuss some of the plans, both in the U.S. and globally, that are being implemented to address the current roadblocks, and some of the ways in which the world can address vaccine equity. PLEASE NOTE: The discussion and information provided in this podcast are for general educational, scientific, and informational purposes only and are not intended as, and should not be treated as, medical or other professional advice for any particular individual or individuals.  Every person and medical issue is different, and diagnosis and treatment requires consideration of specific facts often unique to the individual.  As such, the information contained in this podcast should not be used as a substitute for consultation with and/or treatment by a doctor or other medical professional.  If you are experiencing any medical issue or have any medical concern, you should consult with a doctor or other medical professional.  Further, due to the inherent limitations of a podcast such as this as well as ongoing scientific developments, we do not guarantee the completeness or accuracy of the information or analysis provided in this podcast, although, of course we always endeavor to provide comprehensive information and analysis. In no event may Unbiased Science or any of the participants in this podcast be held liable to the listener or anyone else for any decision allegedly made or action allegedly taken or not taken allegedly in reliance on the discussion or information in this podcast or for any damages allegedly resulting from such reliance.
59 min
Vertical Farming Podcast
Vertical Farming Podcast
Harry Duran
S2E26: s2e26 Sepehr Mousavi - Sustainability, Innovation and the Future of AgTech
Episode Summary Join Harry Duran, host of Vertical Farming Podcast, as he welcomes to the show speaker, futurist and Chief Sustainability Officer at SweGreen, Sepehr Mousavi. Sepehr is a sustainability strategist, innovation catalyst and a passionate futurist with an international and multicultural background. His organization, SweGreen, is the number one AgTech company in Sweden and is revolutionizing the vertical farming industry by providing futuristic, smart and circular solutions for controlled-environment growing systems. In this episode, Harry and Sepehr discuss Sepehr’s unique background and vertical farming origin story. They delve deep into the concepts of symbiosis, smart real estate solutions and the importance of Research and Development. Finally, Sepehr speaks to the importance of educating the world on vertical farming and what excites him the most about the future of SweGreen and the AgTech industry. Episode Sponsor Ceres Greenhouse Solutions Key Takeaways 03:22 – Harry welcomes to the show Sepehr Mousavi, Chief Sustainability Officer and Founding partner at SweGreen, who discusses his background and roots, what brought him to Sweden and how he got involved in vertical farming and AgTech 11:38 – What Sepehr learned from his time at Plantagon, one of the early pioneers in AgTech 20:15 – Sepehr expounds on the concept of symbiosis 24:18 – Sepehr talks about farming as a service 30:47 – Sepehr expounds on SweGreen’s smart real estate solutions 34:37 – The importance of Research and Development (R&D) 36:41 – Sepehr speaks to why he identifies as a futurist, where he looks for inspiration and what excites him about the future of AgTech 44:42 – The importance of educating consumers and those looking to enter a career in AgTech or vertical farming 47:46 – Sepehr shares the SweGreen initiatives he’s most excited about 53:11 – Harry thanks Sepehr for joining the show and let’s listeners know where they can connect with him  Tweetable Quotes “If you’re going to scale down the innovation from a city function to something that could feed neighborhoods, then you could look at smart buildings and how you could build up symbiosis.”(21:09) “The logistics of food is very difficult to handle.”(25:28) “From the very beginning I was very interested in history. And what I learned from history is that if you look at the process of how we got here, you could speculate where we’re going to end up in the future because we always repeat these evolutionary trends.”(37:52) “When I look at our farmers today, they are people in their twenties coming to work in their hoodies, listening to their hip-hop music, planning things on their iPad and then doing the practical work. And this is the future of our farmers.” (46:07) “If you talk about how we conceive food as a concept that ends up in our shopping bags, people have got more used to technology solving the issue. So the reaction is ‘wow, this is really cool,’ rather than, ‘I’m a skeptic.’”(51:02) Links Mentioned SweGreen Website Sepehr’s LinkedIn Plantagon Website Sepehr’s Blog 🎙️🎙️🎙️ Podcast Production and Marketing by FullCast: https://bit.ly/3sxZ34y See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
58 min
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
141. Where CX and Behavioral Science Meet, interview with Jennifer Clinehens, author of Choice Hacking
Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London, where she uses behavioral science and psychology to improve the customer experience for brands like Lloyds Banking Group and Compare the Market. Jennifer has helped mold experiences with behavioral science for brands like McDonald's, AT&T, O2, and Adidas across the globe. She is also the author of four books including the one we will be discussing today, Choice Hacking: How to use psychology and behavioral science to create an experience that sings, AND she has two different podcasts, Choice Hacking and Everybody Hates Your Brand. Wow, talk about a busy and productive person, amirite? I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Show Notes: * [00:40] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London. * [03:05] Jennifer shares her background and how she got involved in behavioral science. She has been lucky to work for many companies across many countries. * [04:35] A lot of the work she has been doing lately has been about the intersection between behavioral science and psychology. She takes those principles and applies them to experience design. * [06:48] One of the big things Jennifer does is framing touchpoints. * [09:39] Crossing over from one medium to another is a difficult point where we often lose some potential customers. There are a lot of steps that happen in the customer journey process. * [10:28] Generally, when you design a customer journey you use a customer journey map: a visual representation of what the customer journey is. * [10:45] On a map the customer journey is linear, but in real life it is messy. Yes, we have a beautiful picture of what the customer journey should be, but in the back of your mind, you have to be pragmatic. * [11:49] The closer we can get to design touchpoints and customer communications with a scientific approach or foundation to apply it to the real world the better it is. * [13:08] The number one thing brands seem to get wrong (or miss completely) is peak-end and applying it across the customer journey. The emotional journey is the secret sauce. * [14:17] A lot of brands get their ending wrong. They don’t know where the real ending is. * [15:41] Brands, in general, don’t realize that the last mile (the true ending) is so critical in so many ways. * [16:17] Jennifer shares an example of Disney realizing the customer journey didn’t end when you left their park. * [17:19] Making the very end of your experience even better and more exciting means your memory of the time you spent in Disneyland is even better. It is how you are constructing the memory, it is not about every single moment you had. It is that emotional peak and true ending that matter. * [17:57] “A brand is a memory.” Peter Steidl (from one of Melina’s “go-to” brainy books, Neurobranding, linked below) * [20:33] There are a few different ways you can look for that true end in your business. * [21:44] Part of the issue of finding that true ending also has to do with silos. * [23:56] The brands that measure on a journey-level versus a touchpoint level have much more value at the end of the day. * [25:32] Melina shares how an online mattress company handles its customer journey. * [27:16] It is important to think through all the moments in the experience: where there could be problems and frustrations and turning it into a really great shareable moment/story. Then you have different associations with that brand. * [28:30] Going that little bit extra and saying “Is that really the end of the customer experience?” is so important. * [29:14] Jennifer shares some of her favorite concepts. Peak-end is her favorite, but the most overlooked is visual salience. * [31:27] Melina shares her experience when she toured the Human Behavior Lab at Texas A&M. * [33:46] Jennifer encourages brands to have someone who is responsible for making sure effectiveness and emotion are being delivered on in the journey level. * [36:20] When you know what you are looking for then you can see if you are on track and put in those nudges. If you don’t know the end game, it is not as effective as it could be. The quality of the work is in the quality of the brief. * [38:06] Making choices easy is so much of what they do. Getting brands to understand where to get people ready to buy is the first step. * [39:15] The first thing they do is think: “Where are the points we need to be nudging to action?” and “Where are the points we need to be inspiring people?” They are usually not the same place. * [39:23] The book Choice Hacking is a good first start for people to think about a framework to apply this at the journey level. * [40:11] Melina’s closing reflections. * [41:46] Grab Melina’s brand new book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You), which is now on presale! Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. Get the Books Mentioned on this Episode: * Choice Hacking * Free Chapter of Choice Hacking * Neurobranding Connect with Jennifer: * Jennifer on Twitter * More About Jennifer Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Texas A&M Certificate Program * Inside the Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab * iMotions (The main software the Human Behavior Lab runs on.) * NUDGES & Choice Architecture * Framing * Priming * Interview with Will Leach * Peak-End Rule * Surprise and Delight * The Overwhelmed Brain and Its Impact on Decision Making * Interview with Roger Dooley * Time Discounting * Reciprocity Check out (and preorder!) my upcoming book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You) on Amazon, Bookshop, and Barnes & Noble If you are outside the US, please complete this form to be first to know when the book is available near you AND to help show there is a presence in your country to speed along international agreements and get it to you faster!
44 min
The Engineers Collective
The Engineers Collective
New Civil Engineer
Making carbon net zero as common nature as health and safety with Ruth Jeffs from Waterman Group
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43 min
Leaders in Supply Chain and Logistics
Leaders in Supply Chain and Logistics
Alcott Global
#107: Startups in Supply Chain from a Venture Capital Perspective
In this episode, we have Sune Stilling and Peter Hove Hildebrandt as our guests. Sune Stilling is the Co-founder of Project Aviato, an independent investment fund to support companies with ideas in transport and logistics. Prior to joining Project Aviato, Sune led Maersk's investment arm Maersk Growth since 2017 and reporting directly to the Group CEO Søren Skou. Maersk is one of the world’s leading transport and logistics companies. Also, the largest container ship and supply vessel operator in the world, controlling ~ 20% of seaborne consumer goods — from apparel through autos.  Peter Hove Hildebrandt is the Co-founder of Project Aviato, an independent investment fund to support companies with ideas in transport and logistics. Prior to Project Aviato, he joined Maersk in 2005, and in 2020 he became the Head of Transportation. Peter is responsible for leading and driving the digital transformation of the Maersk Ocean & Logistics business. Maersk is an integrated container logistics company working to connect and simplify its customers’ supply chains. As the global leader in shipping services, the company operates in 130 countries. *Discover more details **here.** * *Some of the highlights of the episode:* * How to spot a million-dollar startup * The key skills that most start-up founders miss (SALES, FINANCIALS, SALES!) * How not to screw up investments * Where the supply chain and logistics industry is heading in next years * Why Rune Sørensen is the best asset any company could hope for * How they filter good startups to invest in *Follow us on:* Instagram: http://bit.ly/2Wba8v7 Twitter: http://bit.ly/2WeulzX Linkedin: http://bit.ly/2w9YSQX Facebook: http://bit.ly/2HtryLd
52 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
The "Perfect" Little Economy of New Zealand
This is new Zealand, a picturesque nation whos economy looks to exclusively rely on throwing their tourists off cliffs in increasingly imaginative ways and being left off of world maps. But Australia’s little brother is so much more than that and it might truely be the world’s best managed economy. Everything from the world banks ease of doing business index, from multiple quality of life assessments puts new zealand in the top spot. Move aside Norway. What’s more is that it has achieved this remarkable prosperity despite not having a huge supply of natural resources, or acting as some tax haven for global businesses like so many other apparent economic miracles we have explored before. No New Zealand has got to where it is today by carefully managing a market economy and providing a safe, stable and confidence inspiring place to start a family, a business, and a career. Of course there are still some problems and we will certainly get to them but after exploring the Economy of Argentina last week, it’s now time to get out your pen and paper and take notes on how to actually run an economy. And to do this as always we are going to break the economy into some important categories. What are the primary drivers of New Zealand's economic prosperity? How has the nation been able to accommodate these where other nations fail to do so? And what are the challenges the nation might face to keep this success going? Once thats all done we can then put New zealand on the economics explained national leaderboard.
18 min
Materialism
Materialism
Taylor Sparks and Andrew Falkowski
Episode 34: μ: Cookware
Andrew and Ramsey take a look into the surprising science that helps make cooking as easy as can be. They explain the dangers that cooking with some of these chemicals can create and how to avoid it. If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com. Make sure to subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify, google play, and now Youtube or wherever you find your podcasts. If you like the show and want to help us reach more people, consider leaving a review - it helps us improve and it exposes new people to the show. Finally, check out our Instagram page @materialism.podcast and connect with us to let us know what new material you’d like to hear about next. We’d like to give a shoutout to AlphaBot for allowing us to use his music within the podcast. Check him out on Spotify. And as always a special thanks to Kolobyte who created the intro and outro for our podcast. He makes a ton of really cool synthwave music which you can check out at kolobyte.bandcamp.com. Visit our sponsors for this episode www.materialstoday.com, and matmatch.com. Follow us on Instagram: @materialism.podcast Follow us on Twitter: @MaterialismPod Visit our website: www.materialismpodcast.com Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (co-creator, co-host, production), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance, co-host). Support Materialism by donating to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism
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