Out of the Crisis
Out of the Crisis
Jul 13, 2020
Revolution Foods: Rethinking the Food Supply Chain
Play episode · 1 hr 4 min

Kristin Groos Richmond and Kirsten Saenz Tobey had no idea that they were building a nationwide phenomenon when in 2006, they founded Revolution Foods. Their mission was simply to provide kid-inspired, chef-crafted food to school aged children. Fast forward to 2020, they were serving over 2 million meals per week to kids across the country.

When COVID hit and they saw their revenue decline, they made the choice to get into the fight. Kirsten and Kristin used their food supply chain to get meals to the most vulnerable among us at nursing homes and homeless shelters. While there is so much more work to do, Revolution Foods is providing crucial support at a time of need. We should all follow their example.

The Thoughtful Travel Podcast
The Thoughtful Travel Podcast
Amanda Kendle
210 How Travel Helps Us Really Understand the World
It's Episode 210, a nice round number so it's time for a special edition of The Thoughtful Travel Podcast. As some of you may know, I've spent a fair bit of time working on my first book about thoughtful travel, and in this episode, I decided to tell you some stories from a particular section of my book that talks about how travel really helps us to understand the world better - in a way that no textbook, movie or book can ever do. The first tale I share is one of many situations I've been in where travelling helped me understand world history more deeply. It's simultaneously one of my least favourite but most impactful travel days, visiting the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps in southern Poland. Next, I move on to another less-than-cheery (but important!) topic, with a story about how a small incident on my travels got me thinking more deeply about racism. To lighten the tone, I then have a story to share about what travelling has taught me about religion - it's a story involving a car and a shrine in Japan ... Finally, my last tale about travel helping me to understand the world is one about how getting to know local people can help you learn what's beyond the simple textbooks - in this case, it's about communism/socialism and what I learnt from visiting Slovakia. Links: Join our Facebook group for Thoughtful Travellers - https://www.facebook.com/groups/thoughtfultravellers Show notes: https://notaballerina.com/210 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
21 min
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Wine for Normal People
Ep 347: The Grape Miniseries -- Viognier
Saved from the brink of extinction just 50 years ago, Viognier (pronounced vee-ohn-yay), is a white grape that's native to the Northern Rhône in France – mainly the areas of Condrieu and Ampuis. The grape produces effusive wines with a strong aromatic character -- peaches, apricots, flowers, herbs, and ginger are common -- and when made well it has a medium body with a touch of acidity and a pleasant bitterness. This week we continue the grape mini-series (maxi series now?) by exploring this comeback kid and the pleasure it can bring when in the right hands. History Viognier's parentage is a bit ambiguous, but it is related to Mondeuse Blanche, which makes it either a half sibling or grandparent of Syrah (as MC Ice points out, we could definitely make a word problem out of this – it’s a brain twister to think about, but possible!). The grape is also tied to Freisa and may be related to Nebbiolo, both which are native to the Piedmont region of northwestern Italy. Viognier was once grown pretty widely in the northern Rhône but the combination of the phylloxera outbreak in the mid- and late-19th century, followed by WWI, the Depression, and WWII drove a lot of growers to cities and left vineyards abandoned. By 1965, only about 30 acres (12 hectares) of Viognier vines remained in France, and the variety was nearly extinct. In the mid-1980s, interest started to grow both in France and from winegrowers in Australia and California. Growing interest lead to more plantings and today the grape is grown in Condrieu, Chateau Grillet, and Côte Rôtie in the Northern Rhône, all over the southern Rhône for blends, the Languedoc in southern France, as well as in North and South America, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and Spain. Climate and Vineyard * Viognier needs a long, warm growing season to fully ripen, but not so hot it develops excessive levels of sugar before its aromatic notes can develop. Viognier must get ripe to allow flavor to develop and that happens late, often after sugars develop. * Viognier is a small thick-skinned berry with good resistance to rot. It does well on acidic, granite soils. Older vines – more than 30 or 50 years old are best for the grape. * There are at least two clones of Viognier. The older, original one from Condrieu is highly aromatic and tight clustered. The other is healthier, higher yielding and looks and tastes different according to some. This clone, likely made at the University of Montpellier, is widespread in Australia. Winemaking begins in the vineyard – picking decision is vital: * Pick too early and the grape has no flavor, and makes a flat wine. Pick too late the wine is flabby and oily. Must be ripe but not overripe, with lower yields. * Although it is likely best to make the wine in stainless or neutral oak with perhaps some skin contact for a few hours before fermenting, the barrel fermentations, malolactic fermentations, and aging on lees can squash the unique flavor and scent of Viognier. Flavors and Styles * Viognier is like peach, apricot, clementine, honeysuckle, chamomile, jasmine, thyme, pine, spice, ginger, crème fraiche, and honey with a full body and can be oily, or sometimes a bit bitter. It is low in acidity. When aged in oak it tastes like vanilla bean and with malolactic fermentation it is creamy and custard-like. It is almost always high in alcohol, with 14.5% ABV being common. The best Viognier from France often doesn’t age, and even loses aromas after a few years in the bottle. Some of the styles from Australia and the US, which have been aged in oak, last a few more years. * The grape is often bottled as a single variety but can be blended with Roussanne, Marsanne, and Grenache Blanc. * We didn’t mention this in the show, but the wine can be off-dry or even late harvest and sweet. Condrieu and Château-Grillet produce sweet wines in warmer years. Regions... France Northern Rhône: Viognier is grown as single variety in Rhône appellations Condrieu and Château Grillet on right (west) bank of Rhône River. In Côte Rôtie, winemakers can include up to 20% of Viognier though most growers add no more than 5%. Condrieu * Includes seven communes along 14 miles, and makes wines that are usually dry, delicious young, and very aromatic wit structure. The area includes steep hillside vineyards, that face south-southeast to maximize morning sun, not hot evening sun. The soils are granite with a deep sandy topsoil called arzelle. This soil makes the best wine. Yields must be low, and picking must be after the grape has full aromatics. * Top producers: Guigal, Rostaing, Delas, Pierre Gaillard, Vernay, Francois Villard Chateau Grillet * This appellation is owned by one producer, it is a monopole. It is just 7.6 acres/3.08 ha on granite soil with mica – making the wines higher in acid. Vines are 80+ years old and although the area seems ideal, there have been problems with wine quality. Recently the owner of Château Latour of Bordeaux acquired the monopole; there’s hope for restoration of its former glory. Côte Rôtie * We did a whole podcast on this area, but north of Condrieu is Côte Rôtie, a Syrah appellation that can include up to 20% Viognier in the wine (in reality it’s more like 5%). Viognier helps darken the color of the Syrah in co-pigmentation but it takes up valuable real estate so it’s not used as much as it could be. Other French areas: The southern Rhône, where it is blended, the Languedoc and Ardeche, where it makes serviceable Vins de Pays varietal or blended wines. Other Europe: Switzerland, Austria, Italy New World Australia * Yalumba was the pioneer producer in South Australia’s Eden Valley in 1979. The Virgilius is their top wine (aged in oak). * McLaren Vale, Barossa, Adelaide Hills, Heathcote, Geelong, Central Victoria, and more grow the grape, which is a challenge to growers because it stays flavorless for much of the growing season and then transforms into something delicious – patience is a virtue! * One of the best uses for Viognier in Australia is its blends with Shiraz: * Clonakilla (Canberra), Yering Station (Yarra), Torbreck (Barossa) United States California * Viognier came in 1980s to California when John Alban (Alban Vineyards in Edna Valley), Josh Jensen of Calera (Central Coast), and Joseph Phelps (Napa), brought it into the United States in small quantities. The plantings and interest grew as a group of producers dedicated to growing Rhône varieties, called the Rhône Rangers, grew in numbers and popularity. Today California has more than 3,000 acres of Viognier. * Yields are high compared to France, the wines can often be overblown if grown in too-hot weather but the greatest examples are full-bodied and rich. * Top Producers: Tablas Creek, Crux, Qupé, Alban, Calera, Kunde Virginia * Viognier is a signature grape of Virginia because the thick skins of the grape work well in the humidity and the diurnals of the mountains mean Viognier can ripen but maintain acidity over a long growing season. The typical VA Viognier has great fruit, slight bitterness, medium body and good acidity. * Top producers: Barboursville, King Family, Horton * Other US: Oregon, Washington (we mention ABEJA), Texas * Around the World: New Zealand, South Africa, South America (Argentina has a lot, Chile some – all young plantings) Food: The wine is great with dishes that have rosemary, thyme, saffron, and creamy sauces. Expect to spend more than $50 a bottle for good Viognier (we had the 2017 version of the Guigal below. It was US$50). ___________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Thanks to YOU! The podcast supporters on Patreon, who are helping us to make the podcast possible and who we give goodies in return for their help! Check it out today: https://www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople And to sign up f…
43 min
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast
Travis Sherry
European Road Tripping In 1975 w/ Marshall & Debbie Hockett
Today is all about #vanlife but we are going back in time to 1975 to see how much it has changed over the years. I am happy to welcome Marshall & Debbie Hockett from Tripping1975.com, who, in 1975, hopped on a plane to Europe, grabbed a VW van named Banana, spent a year exploring the continent...and then, wrote a book about it 45 years later! How much has traveled changed for you over the years? Let us know by tagging us in a post on Instagram at @ExtraPackofPeanuts. Today's podcast is sponsored by Oregon State University ECampus. In This Episode * 03:00 Getting The Book Written * 05:40 Decision To Getting The Book Out * 07:00 Biggest Differences In Travel From The '70s to Now * 09:00 Highlights From The Trip * 12:25 Planning The Trip & The Route They Took in 1975 * 19:15 Places That Exceeded Expectations * 21:00 Only One Argument In A Year * 25:00 Biggest Changes In Your Travel Style & Getting Back To Europe * 29:30 Biggest Travel Mishap * 36:00 Getting Engaged On The Road Important Links * Find Marshall & Debbie Hockett from Tripping1975.com * Follow Marshall & Debbie on Facebook | Instagram * Buy Tripping 1975 Here * Oregon State University E-Campus * Location Indie * Want to follow our adventures? Check out our Instagram's @ExtraPackOfPeanuts, @HeatherSherry, and @TravelingWhitMyles Want More? * The Beauty Of Imperfect Travels w/ Christine & Jules * Van Life As A Female Traveler w/Sydney Febrache * From NFL to Van Life w/ Joe Hawley
39 min
The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering
The Future of Everything presented by Stanford Engineering
Stanford Radio
Markus Covert: How to build a computer model of a cell
When Stanford bioengineer Markus Covert first decided to create a computer model able to simulate the behavior of a single cell, he was held back by more than an incomplete understanding of how a cell functions, but also by a lack of computer power. His early models would take more than 10 hours to churn through a single simulation and that was when using a supercomputer capable of billions of calculations per second. Nevertheless, in his quest toward what had been deemed "a grand challenge of the 21st century," Covert pressed on and eventually published a paper announcing his success in building a model of just one microbe: _E. coli_, a popular subject in biological research. The model would allow researchers to run experiments not on living bacteria in a lab, but on a simulated cell on a computer. After all was said and done, however, the greatest takeaway for Covert was that a cell is a very, very complex thing. There were fits and starts and at least one transcendent conceptual leap — which Covert has dubbed “deep curation” — needed to make it all happen, but he found a way. As Covert points out, no model is perfect, but some are useful. And that is how usefulness, not perfection, became the goal of his work, as he tells fellow bioengineer Russ Altman in this episode of _Stanford Engineering’s The Future of Everything_ podcast. Listen here, and subscribe to the podcast here.
28 min
Zero To Travel Podcast
Zero To Travel Podcast
Jason Moore
Exploring Your Limiting Beliefs & Finding Your Purpose w/ Kathleen Sinclair
Today we have Kathleen Sinclair who earned her master's degree at 60-years-old, joined the Peace Corps at 63, and is now traveling the US in her trailer living the road life. Kathleen and I are getting into deep conversations with this episode and talking about the universal themes that permeate throughout time and are ageless, how to conquer limiting beliefs that may be keeping you stuck, and finding your purpose in life regardless of age. What have been your limiting beliefs? How have they affected your life and goals? Send me an audio message (please) or shoot me an email over at Jason@ZeroToTravel.com. I am so excited to partner with HomeExchange.com who makes it possible to see the world without paying for accommodations. Make sure you listen to the entire podcast to get the promo code to save you some extra cash when you get your first exchange.Tune In To Learn: * 11:30 Thoughts On Limiting Beliefs * 13:50 Traveling In A Caravan * 17:30 Finding A Purpose in Life * 26:00 Freedom & Living Life Fully * 29:00 Why Does The US Only Celebrate The Young * 33:25 Strategies On Finding Your Purpose * 40:00 Conquering Limiting Beliefs * 44:25 Learning More About Yourself * 45:45 Jobs vs. Career * 47:20 Advice On Embracing Your Inner Calling * 52:00 Hidden Gems In Traveling * And so much moreResources: * Find Kathleen On Her Website * Follow Kathleen on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Medium * HomeExchange * Location IndieWant More? * How To Create A Successful App, Travel By Sailboat, and The Lifestyle Entrepreneur's Mindset w/ Dane Homenick * 5th Anniversary Special: Conscious Travel Mindset w/ Rob Greenfield * 16 Mindset Hacks To Help You Travel Long Term Please head over to the archives for more Zero To Travel podcasts!
1 hr 12 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu