The Book Show
The Book Show
Nov 22, 2020
Dawn French on questions of motherhood
Play • 54 min
What makes someone a mother? Dawn French and Kate Mildenhall explore this question, and we have a writer's hotline with Luke Horton and James Bradley.
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
102. Psychology is overrated
I endeavour to understand and explain the field of education through many disciplines, including neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, economics, and evolutionary biology. Over the course of this podcast's history, I have changed in my reading habits and focus across these disciplines, and in my attitude as to how useful they can be, and where they are best applied. Psychology stands out as a case in point. At first, I thought that psychology would hold all the secrets to knowing how to improve education, by revealing what motivates people, how they think, and how they learn, and showing behavioural "laws" or tendencies that explain the framework from which we should approach understanding ourselves and others. Since then, I have realised that the psychological subfield of cognitive science has profound implications for learning, but the rest of psychology has been a disappointment. Firstly, it suffers from sampling bias. Almost all those who have been tested in psychological experiments are Western university undergraduates. This introduces a cultural bias to the data, and so rather than explaining universal features of humanity (as it supposes), it actually uncovers peculiarities of Western culture. This is dramatically less useful than what I had hoped for, and is no foundation on which to build an understanding of humanity as a whole. Secondly, it has frequent replication issues. There are numerous studies which become famous and frequently cited, only to be shown down the line not to replicate, invalidating their apparently tremendous insight. One high-profile example of this is mindset research, popularised by Carol Dweck, which I mistakenly lauded again and again on this podcast, only to find out down the line that replication studies have shown it not to be such a big deal. In place of psychology, I argue that anthropology and economics are powerful fields that can bring a lot to the table. Anthropology is like psychology but with proper sampling, and economics is like psychology but with much simplified models, which are flawed but also more powerful than many people realise (myself included, until recently). Bringing these two fields in essentially says that culture matters, and we can only understand human universals by looking cross-culturally; that we "fish in water", blind to the forces that shape us all, and we can only see these with outsider's spectacles; that value is a fundamental thing that everyone seeks, and that needs elucidating; and that people more often than not behave in a way that is in line with their own desires. In the episode, I discuss all these, plus also a range of other disciplines that have appeared or will appear on the podcast. Enjoy the episode.
46 min
Talking with Painters
Talking with Painters
Maria Stoljar
Ep 104: Summer Series – Susan Baird
In 2019 I travelled 4 hours west of Sydney, past the Blue Mountains, driving through winding bush roads until I arrived at Hill End, the historic goldmining village which is now also known for its inspiring artist's community. It was there that I interviewed Susan Baird who a few years earlier had fallen in love with the town and now has a home and studio there, deep in the bush. We recorded a previous podcast interview where Susan talked with me about how she became an artist and developed her career. It's one of the most downloaded episodes on the podcast and you can hear it here. We also recorded video which I edited down for a YouTube video. I've since realised, though, that those video recordings are just as valuable as the podcast interview itself and that's why I'm bringing you this 'Summer Series' of longer recordings from videos. What you'll hear in this episode is the full audio recording from the video shoot. Susan's next solo show is coming up in June 2021 at Arthouse Gallery in Sydney and she has small works in the Gallery's current group show (January 2021). She is also represented by Flinders Lane Gallery in Melbourne and it was in the lead up to her last show with Flinders Lane that we recorded this interview. You can hear the podcast interview by pressing 'play' below the above feature photo or listen on your favourite podcast app. Scroll down to see stills of the places and works we talk about in this episode as well as the 2019 YouTube video. 'Bowman's Cottage', Hill End, NSW The shearing shed Susan Baird in her studio (formerly the property's hay shed) The studio ‘Studio Window, Bowman’s Cottage’, 2019, Oil on linen 137 x 97cm Finalist Calleen Art Award 2019 ‘Bush Telegraph’, 2019, oil on linen, 102 x 102cm https://youtu.be/c0_IZpOiHVE YouTube video
26 min
The Travel Diaries
The Travel Diaries
Holly Rubenstein
Jon Ronson - Long Haul
We’re back for Season 4 with the award-winning author, writer, and documentary maker, Jon Ronson. Jon is the author of many best-selling books, including So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, Them: Adventures with Extremists, The Men who Stare at Goats which was adapted to become a movie starring George Clooney and Ewan McGregor, and The Psychopath Test which is the first book of Jon’s that I read, and was hooked ever since. He’s an acclaimed screenwriter, most recently co-writing the 2017 Netflix film, Okja, with Bong Joon-Ho, the South Korean director of Parasite, last year’s Best Picture winner at the Oscars.  And if you’re not already familiar with Jon’s work, I’d suggest checking out one of his recent podcast series, which have been huge hits around the world - The Butterfly Effect and The Last Days of August both look at the effects of the porn industry. Both are fascinating, disturbing and addictive to listen to. Jon’s now based in the US, so we spoke online as per usual these days, and I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did. Destination Recap: * Marlborough College, Wiltshire, England * Avebury, Wiltshire, England * Cardiff, Wales * South Africa * QE2 ship * Queen Mary ship * Rhodes, Greece * Manhattan, New York, USA * Union Hall, Brooklyn, New York, USA * The Bell house, Brooklyn, New York, USA * Grand Central Oyster Bar and Restaurant, New York, USA * Barney Greengrass, New York, USA * Inns of Aurora, Fingerlakes, New York, USA * Hudson, New York, USA * Forte Village Resort, Sardinia, Italy * Forte dei Mami, Tuscany, Italy  * Pacific High Way One, California, USA * Los Angeles, California, USA * Florida, USA * New Zealand * Iceland  A big thank you to Citalia for their support for today’s podcast. You can discover the real Italy with Citalia, the UK’s leading Italian holiday specialists. If you’re enjoying the podcast, then it would wonderful if you could leave a rating or a review - it really makes a big difference because it helps other people to discover the podcast.  To hear future episodes as soon as they’re available just search for The Travel Diaries on your podcast app of choice, and hit subscribe.  To find out who’s joining me on next week’s episode, come and follow me on Instagram, I’m @hollyrubenstein - I’d love to hear from you.  If you can’t wait until then, there’s always the first three seasons to catch up on, from Michael Palin to Rick Stein, and Sir Ranulph Fiennes to Simon Reeve.  Today’s episode was recorded during the UK’s Covid-19 lockdown. It was produced by Holly Rubenstein.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
53 min
The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
Artist Daniel Arsham on How He Built a Creative Empire
When he was just 12 years old, Daniel Arsham had a near-death experience. Living in Florida with his parents, Hurricane Andrew struck in 1992, careening across the coastal state and taking with it Arsham's family house—ripping the roof off, tearing the walls apart at the seams, and sending pink fluffy insulation flying. The house was rebuilt soon after, but the traumatic experience and ensuing weeks of living in a "pre-civilization" state left an indelible imprint on Arsham. The idea of collapsing the past and present, and the formative role architecture played in his understanding of the world, has helped shape Arsham's creative practice, which he describes as fictional archaeology. In his most celebrated series, "Future Relics," Arsham casts objects of commercialism and contemporary society as fragments of an already obsolete time. Along with Alex Mustonen, Arsham founded the irreverently titled group Snarkitechture, and began collaborating with fashion brands like Dior (working with both Hedi Slimane and Kim Jones), KITH, and Adidas, as well as Merce Cunningham and illustrator Hajime Sorayama. Having successfully skated across the boundaries that define genres of art, Arsham's newest gig as creative director of his hometown basketball team, the Cleveland Cavaliers, signaled his supremacy in pop culture. On this week's episode of the Art Angle, Arsham called in from his New York studio to discuss his unlikely story, and what comes next.
38 min
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