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Download This Show
Oct 21, 2020
Is Apple quietly killing your phone?
28 min
Does Apple slow down your phone down to encourage you to buy a new one? Imagine a world without news on Google or Facebook - other countries have done it, so how did it play out for them? And is Twitter too good at dealing with sketchy content on the platform? Guests: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson, national technology editor for News Corp @jendudley + Cameron Wilson, reporter, Business Insider, Gizmodo Australia @cameronwilson
Policy Forum Pod
Policy Forum Pod
Policy Forum Pod
The wellbeing economy - a glimpse of the good life
Rather than returning to the status quo, many are calling for a change in thinking (and in policy) as societies around the world grapple with the coronavirus crisis. One such advocate for change is global development expert David Hulme, who joins Sharon Bessell and Arnagretta Hunter for a fascinating discussion on the wellbeing economy in this instalment in our special mini-series.  Why doesn’t economic growth necessarily lead to increased development? What impact is the COVID-19 crisis having on the world’s most vulnerable communities? And how can societies in developed and developing nations recover from COVID-19 and build a more equitable future with wellbeing at the core of policy decisions? On the fourth episode of our special Policy Forum Pod mini-series on the wellbeing economy, Professor Sharon Bessell and Dr Arnagretta Hunter discuss development in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis with Professor David Hulme, Executive Director of the Global Development Institute. David Hulme is Professor of Development Studies at the University of Manchester where he is Executive Director of the Global Development Institute and CEO of the Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre. Sharon Bessell is Professor of Public Policy and Director of Gender Equity and Diversity at Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU. Arnagretta Hunter is a cardiologist, physician, and a Senior Clinical Lecturer for ANU Medical School. Policy Forum Pod is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Subscribe on Android or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback for this podcast series! Send in your questions, comments, or suggestions for future episodes to podcast@policyforum.net. You can also Tweet us @APPSPolicyForum or join us on the Facebook group.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 6 min
Politics with Michelle Grattan
Politics with Michelle Grattan
The Conversation
Politics with Michelle Grattan: Asia-Pacific expert Bates Gill on China's endgame
Lukas Coch/AAP Chinese official Lijian Zhao’s tweeting an image depicting an Australian soldier holding a knife against a child’s throat and the subsequent angry exchanges is the latest incident in an exceptionally poor year for Australian-Chinese relations. Tensions deepened after Australia’s call for an inquiry into the origins of the coronavirus, and the Chinese have hit Australian exports, most recently with punitive tariffs on wine. Diplomacy is of the mega variety; Australian ministers can’t get their calls returned. Bates Gill is Professor of Asia-Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University, and has published extensively on Chinese domestic and international affairs. His coming book will focus on the goals driving Chinese foreign policy under Xi Jinping. Read more: What's behind China's bullying of Australia? It sees a soft target — and an essential one Gill predicts Chinese military capability, while limited to the areas closest to its shore, will be more assertive in the next five years. He says the list of 14 Chinese grievances, recently reported, gives an indication of what China thinks the ideal relationship with Australia would be. “It would mean keeping our heads down, not criticising the nature and actions of the regime in Beijing and just generally being more accommodating and friendly towards China’s steady rise and ambitions.” “That’s what they want out of Australia.” While it’s often said one Australian export China would find hard to hit – because it depends on the supply – is iron ore, Gill sounds a caution. “Something in the range of 60 or 70%, I believe, of Chinese iron ore imports come from our shores, but they are looking [for] – and there are – other sources out there.” “We would be naive to think that Beijing and its iron ore importers are not looking and … trying to figure out ways to become less dependent on what they see and understand to be a relationship which is not going in a positive direction. ” Additional audio A List of Ways to Die, Lee Rosevere, from Free Music Archive. Michelle Grattan does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.
27 min
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