The Abundant Edge
The Abundant Edge
Nov 27, 2020
Working with nature to build soil health, with Robert Pavlis
Play • 1 hr 17 min
After last week’s session with Matt Powers, I want to add a second perspective on soil and the new science behind how we can restore it to health in our own gardens. For that perspective I got back in touch with Robert Pavlis who was first on this show a few seasons ago to talk about building natural ponds. Robert has been an avid gardener for over four decades. He is the owner and developer of Aspen Grove Gardens, a 6-acre botanical garden that features over 3,000 varieties of plants. As a specialist in soil science, he has been an instructor for Landscape Ontario and is a garden blogger, writer, and chemist. He teaches gardening fundamentals at the University of Guelph and garden design for the City of Guelph, Ontario, where he lives.

One of the things I most appreciate about Robert’s work is that he’s not afraid to challenge any entrenched gardening belief or myth. He is always looking to get to the bottom of what helps plants to grow and what’s just marketing scams. 

In this episode we really dive in deep on the fundamentals of soil composition and understanding the nutrients that plants need to thrive. We talk about looking at soil as an ecosystem unto itself rather than a living material, and why striving for ideal soil is not as important as making sure that you have the components necessary for the life inside it. 

Robert also helps me to understand what happens in the ground after tillage, mulching, and other amendments. We go over simple tests you can do to diagnose your soil without special equipment or needing to pay for laboratory testing, and by the end, how to use the results of those tests to develop your own personalized soil plan. 

This episode alone is like a short but thorough course on soil health, so you might want to keep a notebook handy. 

For those of you who want to really expand your knowledge on soil science, I’ve teamed up with New Society Publishers to give away a free copy of this book. If you want to win a copy of Soil Science for Gardeners, just message me through our dedicated facebook group called Abundant Edge weekly regenerative skills and write a post about why you want to amend the soil on your site. I’ll select a winner one week after this episode comes out and send a hard copy of the book to you if you live in the US or Canada or a digital copy if you live anywhere else in the world. It’s that simple, plus you’ll be joining an incredible group of listeners like you who are sharing their regenerative living journey and learning experiences with the community. 

Resources:

https://abundantedge.com/abundantedge-robert-pavlis/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJfYCNSWCIuOB2sltDh5ZjQ

https://www.robertpavlis.com/books/

https://www.gardenmyths.com/

https://www.gardenmyths.com/garden-myths-book-1/

https://newsociety.com/books/s/soil-science-for-gardeners

https://www.atitlanorganics.com/online-permaculture-design-certification
The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
Featuring special guests such as Jason Mraz, Kari Spencer, Lisa Steele, and
576: Casey Cox on the Story of our Farm
Being a young farmer with a long family history of farming. In This Podcast: There are many people that grow up on a farm that choose to leave to find their calling in the city. However, Casey Cox left her family farm to find her calling only to realize that her destiny was calling from her back yard all along. Listen in to learn about how she found her passion in conservation, her role as a farmer and land stewardship advocate, as well as the various life changing opportunities she has been involved in. Don’t miss an episode! visit UrbanFarm.Org/podcast Casey is the sixth generation of her family to farm on the Flint River in South Georgia. Her family farm, Longleaf Ridge, produces sweet corn, peanuts, field corn, soybeans, and timber. Prior to returning to the farm full-time, Casey managed the Flint River Soil and Water Conservation District, serving as Executive Director for over 5 years. In this role, she developed and directed multiple projects with Federal, state, and private partners and was responsible for procuring and managing over $13.5 million of funding for conservation programs. She was appointed by Secretary Sonny Perdue in 2019 to serve as Georgia’s Alternate Board Member on the National Peanut Board. Casey holds a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Conservation from the University of Florida. Her most significant professional contribution to date was teaching Cookie Monster and Gonger where peanut butter comes from on Season 49 of Sesame Street. Visit www.UrbanFarm.org/longleafridge for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library! Casey Cox on the Story of our Farm.
46 min
Soil Sense
Soil Sense
NDSU Extension
DIRT Workshop Roundup: Strip Tillage, Cover Crops, Relay Crops, and Grazing
This is our final episode of season three. What a great season it has been! To close out season three, we wanted to bring you a highlight reel from the recent DIRT workshop. However, with two full days of material and dozens of experts weighing in on a variety of topics - there was no way to condense things down to a 30 minute Soil Sense episode. So instead, I chose to pull clips from four different individuals, each of which weighed in on a different panel during the DIRT Workshop. Today’s guests were chosen not only for great information and stories, but also because they have not yet been featured on this podcast.You’ll hear from Steven Schuster, a farmer in Minto, North Dakota, talking about strip tillage, then will hear from Stefan Gailans, who is with the Practical Farmers of Iowa talking about cover crops, then Russ Gesch from USDA ARS based out of Morris, MN who shared about relay cropping, and will finish today’s episode with rancher Jerry Doan from McKenzie, ND who describes some of this practices grazing cover crops. “It’s not necessarily about getting the highest yield. It’s about having the most profit from the yield that you are getting, and controlling risk.” - Steven Schuster “A living cover crop is still standing up. Those row units can move through that a little better, so that they don’t plug. They can cut through the cover crop in the soil, get good depth control, and cover up that furrow again.” - Stefan Gailans (on planting soybeans green) “We call these winter oilseed ‘cash cover crops’, because we’re wanting to harvest them to tap into new markets, but also getting those environmental benefits of using it as a cover crop.” - Russ Gesch, Ph.D. (on relay cropping camelina/soybean) “When I was growing up, it was wheat and summer fallow, and half of that soil is in South Dakota because that’s where it blew to back in those days. And I didn’t know if we could bring those soils back...and we’ve been really impressed by how we ARE bringing those back.” - Jerry Doan This Week on Soil Sense: * Steven Schuster, farmer from Minto, ND talks about strip tillage * Stefan Gailans, research and field crops director for the Practical Farmers of Iowa talks about cover crops * Russ Gesch, Ph.D., research plant physiologist with USDA ARS in Morris, MN on relay cropping camelina * Jerry Doan, rancher from McKenzie, ND on grazing cover crops Connect with Soil Sense: * _Soil Sense Initiative _ Soil Sense Podcast is hosted by _Tim Hammerich_ of the _Future of Agriculture Podcast_.
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Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
The Seven First Principles of Regeneration with Carol Sanford (E55)
In this episode pioneering regenerative thinker Carol Sanford rejoins me to share a living systems framework she calls The Seven First Principles of Regeneration. Sketch by Dan based on Carol's description Resources to Deepen Learning My first chat with Carol (also see these follow up words from Carol)My second chat with Carol where she shares her four levels of paradigmCarol's websiteThe Deep Pacific Change Agent Community (That Dan is part of)A series of articles in which Carol applies the Seven First Principles to educationCarol going through the principles in a different way on her Business Second Opinion PodcastCarol's book The Regenerative Life in which she goes through the seven first principlesWholeness and the Implicate Order by David Bohm Carol Sanford. A few transcribed lines from the episode Thanks to MPS patron Jon Buttery for pulling some comments that stood out for him from the chat (with approx times): 13:36 – "I don’t want you to be disappointed that after a year you haven’t got them [the seven first principles], that’s a good sign" 18:57 - "You can’t go do – in the sense that you’ll change something – you have to go think a different way and you have to start in a different place" 22:43 - "The word ‘systems thinking’ is thrown around for a lot of things that are machine based"  23:23 – "There are no feedback loops …. we impose those kinds of ideas" 24:05 – "A fragmented view …  we assume … if we get good enough … somehow we’ll see how they all relate"  26:53 – "What is the work this place does in this planet?  … what is its story?" 30:23 – "Watch yourself making lists" 32:26 – "Fragmentation is the basis of every problem on the earth" 38:40 – "It took me literally a couple of decades to learn to see essence. … it’s a different way of seeing the world"
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Farm Small Farm Smart
Farm Small Farm Smart
The Modern Grower Podcast Network
Create Your Best 2021 - A Process for Reflecting on 2020 to Plan 2021 (FSFS232)
We’ve just signed off from 2020 and we’re starting a new year in 2021. Looking back at the past year, how does it make you feel? Are you sighing with relief, just glad that it’s finally over? Or maybe you’re looking at how even though 2020 wasn’t that great of a year, there were still things to be happy and thankful about? Javan's workshop: https://allpointsdesign.ca/product/envision-2021-workshop/ In this episode of Farm Small, Farm Smart, we have Javan Bernakevitch, and we’re talking about year-end reviews: how you should do it, why you should do it, and how it can hopefully help set you up for a better 2021 by doing an honest self-reflection and setting intention. It won’t just be looking at facts and numbers, it’s also taking stock of your emotions, what brought you joy, what brought you suffering, and planning it out in the year ahead to get the same, or even better, results. It's simply changing your approach. Follow Javan: https://allpointsdesign.ca/ https://allpointsdesign.ca/life-design Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter and Other Small Farm Equipment at https://www.paperpot.co/ Follow Diego on IG https://instagram.com/diegofooter Follow PaperpotCo on IG https://instagram.com/paperpot Podcasts by Diego Footer: Microgreens: https://apple.co/2m1QXmW Vegetable Farming: https://apple.co/2lCuv3m Livestock Farming: https://apple.co/2m75EVG Large Scale Farming: https://apple.co/2kxj39i Small Farm Tools https://www.paperpot.co/
1 hr 12 min
The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy
The Beginner's Garden with Jill McSheehy
Jill McSheehy
169 - Pros & Cons of Soil Blocking for Indoor Seed Starting
Interested in soil blocking? Today I am providing you with all the information you need to decide if this method is right for you. Show Notes: (*links below contain affiliate links, which means if you click through and make a purchase, we will earn a commission at no extra cost to you.) Before You Sow Mini Course Free download until January 31st! Journeywithjill.net/beforeyousow Complete Garden Planner https://journeywithjill.net/shop/ Organic REV The first thing to understand about REV is that it is not an ordinary humic acid product that is chemically-extracted from leonardite, lignite, or other coals. Rather, it is a 100% naturally-occurring carbon, humic acid & fulvic acid source - along with exceptionally high levels of naturally-occurring microbial biomass that can increase nitrogen efficiency by up to 25%. REV replaces depleted soil carbon & bacterial biomass - and absorbs nutrients to make them more readily available to plants via their root systems. Promo Code for 10% off JILL10 How to Use Soil Blocks for Indoor Seed Starting https://journeywithjill.net/gardening/2020/01/29/soil-blocking-pros-and-cons-to-using-soil-blocks-in-indoor-seed-starting/ Soil Block Maker https://amzn.to/35EvSTv Fox Farm Potting Mix https://amzn.to/2XEaIAo Peat Moss https://amzn.to/2LNqgiR ProMix Potting Soil https://amzn.to/3oTHytn Vegetable Gardening for Beginners Book: https://amzn.to/3kZXFDu Connect with Jill: Sign up for Friday Emails: https://journeywithjill.net/gardensignup Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebeginnersgarden/ Beginner's Garden Shortcut FB Group: https://facebook.com/groups/beginnersgarden/ Link to Beginner's Garden Podcast past episodes: journeywithjill.net/podcast
39 min
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