The OCD Stories
The OCD Stories
1 Nov 2020
Justin Hughes – Faith, spirituality and religion in OCD therapy (#250)
1 hr 6 mins
In episode 250 I chat with Justin Hughes. Justin is a licensed professional counsellor in Dallas, Texas who specializes in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In this episode I chat with Justin about his therapy story, how faith/spirituality and therapy can work together, when OCD shakes someone’s faith, Christian scriptures around fear, worry and uncertainty, working with shame from the taboo nature of intrusive thoughts, living with uncertainty, words of hope, and much much more.

The podcast is sponsored by NOCD. To find out more about NOCD, their therapy plans and if they currently take your insurance head over to https://go.treatmyocd.com/theocdstories

The post Justin Hughes – Faith, spirituality and religion in OCD therapy (#250) appeared first on The OCD Stories.
Shrink Rap Radio
Shrink Rap Radio
David Van Nuys, Ph.D.
#725 Latest Developments in Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy
Phil Wolfson MD is the creator of a new psychotherapy modality based on use of the medicine ketamine—Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy (KAP).  Phil is the CEO of the non-profit Ketamine Research Foundation and directs the training of KAP practitioners through The Ketamine Training Center—now numbering over 300 practitioners across the US and Internationally. He is the author of The Ketamine Papers and Noe– A Father/Son Song of Love, Life, Illness and Death.  He has been the Principal Investigator of the recently completed MAPS.org Phase 2 study of MDMA treatment for individuals with life-threatening illnesses. Dr. Wolfson’s work is the result of an intense, now many decades long clinical psychiatry/psychotherapy practice. Phil  is a sixties activist, psychiatrist/psychotherapist, writer, practicing Buddhist and psychonaut who has lived in the Bay Area for 43 years. Sunny Strasburg is a Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice, licensed in Utah and Maryland. She is an EMDR Certified trauma specialist. She is a graduate of the Certification for Psychedelic Assisted Therapy from the California Institute of Integral Studies and Pacifica Graduate Institute. Sunny utilizes Gottman Couples Method, attachment theory, Jungian Depth psychology and Internal Family Systems and Ego State work. Mrs Strasburg offers Ketamine Assisted Therapy. She has co-authored trauma protocols for Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy with Dr. Phil Wolfson. She was mentored by Dr. Brian Richards and currently working on KAP projects at the Aquilino Cancer Center. Mrs. Strasburg trained at Compass Pathways in psilocybin assisted psychotherapy. Mrs Strasburg completed a volunteer residency at Synthesis with psilocybin, and trained at Helios in Ketamine Assisted Therapy. She was trained in MDMA Assisted Therapy by Michael and Annie Mithoefer through MAPS, and co-facilitates Holotropic Breathwork Workshops with Stacia Butterfield. Sunny lived near an ayahuasca retreat center in Latin America, and served to help participants to both prepare for and integrate their experiences. Mrs Strasburg is also a visual artist and her paintings were recently featured on the MAPS yearly bulletin for 2019. Sunny loves to energize and inspire people. Her passion is to network and connect visionaries, to teach, facilitate, write, and most of all, to collaborate. She feels a calling to bring psychedelic medicine to people suffering from trauma, depression and anxiety. Related LInks: Indras Net Ketamine Training Center Sunny's art: Phil Wolfson therapy website: Sunny Strasburg therapy website: The Ketamine Papers: Noe: A Father-Son Song of Life, Love, Illness and Death
1 hr
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
217: Ask David: Is human "worthwhileness" worthwhile? Why am I always the the last to find out about anything? A Daily Gratitude Log, Positive Reframing and more!
Today's Ask David features four terrific questions. * Kevin asks: Why is the concept of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? * Vallejo asks: Does the statement, "WHY AM I ALWAYS THE LAST ONE TO FIND OUT ABOUT ANYTHING?” correspond to overgeneralization, or self-blame? I’ve been listening to the early podcasts on the ten positive and negative cognitive distortions. * David P asks: Do you think there is anything to be gained from a daily gratitude log, to go along with the daily mood log? * Harvey asks: I don’t see how Positive Reframing actually contributes to the therapy. * Kevin asks: Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Hi David, I have a quick question about the concept of being a worthwhile human being. Suppose a person believes they are unconditionally worthwhile, what are the implications of this? Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Best Regards, Kevin Hi Kevin, Thanks! That’s a very important question. However, it is abstract and philosophical. I have found that philosophical discussions tend to go on endlessly with resolve. In contrast, when someone asks for help with a specific moment when she or he was upset, then I can usually show that person how to change the way she or he is feeling. And when that happens, the person generally suddenly “sees” the solution to some very profound philosophical or spiritual questions. All that being said, I’ll take a crack at it. The goal of TEAM therapy is not to go from thinking that you’re a worthless human being to thinking that you’re a worthwhile human being, but to give up these concepts as nonsensical. Specific activities, talents or thoughts can be more or less worthwhile, but a human being cannot be more or less worthwhile. We can judge specific events, actions, and so forth, but not humans. At least I am not aware of how to validly judge a human being, or a group of humans. We can only judge their actions, attitudes, thoughts, and so forth. Unconditional self-esteem is definitely better than conditional self-esteem, since you don’t have to be perfect or a great achiever or a great anything to be “worthwhile,” but you are still focused on being "worthwhile." I'm not sure what that means, but there is a downside, to my way of thinking. If you think you are worthwhile because you are a human being, does that mean that you are more worthwhile than animals? Lots of people abuse animals, hunt animals, and so forth, which many people find immensely disturbing. These are some of the consequences of thinking that animals are less worthwhile, for example. Not sure that helps, but like your line of questioning! David Kevin follows up: What is the implication then of giving up these concepts at all? I assume that thinking that you have unconditional worthwhileness because you are alive or to drop these concepts entirely have the same emotional implications for people. What are these implications? For example, if I think that worthwhileness and worthlessness are meaningless concepts, so what? What’s the point? What do I gain? Hi Kevin, Let me start by saying, once again, that I am not an evangelist spreading the “gospel,” so to speak. My goal is simply to help people who are struggling with feelings of depression, anxiety, and self-doubt. So, if your way of thinking about things is working for you, there’s no reason to change. But my focus is always on someone who is suffering, and that’s where these concepts can sometimes be important. I can tell you what I gained by giving up the idea that I could be, or needed to be “worthwhile” or “special.” I gained a great deal of joy. It was a lot like escaping from a mental prison. It freed me to find incredible joy in the “ordinary” events of my daily life. It also freed me from fears of “failure” or not being “good enough.” Depression always results from Overgeneralization--you generalize from failing at something specific to thinking you are a failure as a human being. Without Overgeneralization, I think it is safe to say that it is impossible to be depressed. For example, if you measure your worthwhileness based on your achievements and success, you may feel excited when you succeed and devastated or anxious when you fail, or when you are in danger of failing. I'm not sure if this addresses your excellent question! A young woman told herself that she was "unloveable" when she and her boyfriend broke up after two years of going together. Can you see that she thinks she has a "self" that can be "loveable" or "unloveable?" This thought was very disturbing to her, as you might imagine. Relationships do not break up because someone is "unloveable," but because of specific factors or events that drive people apart. Once you zero in on why the relationship failed, or more correctly, why the two of you broke up, then you can pinpoint the causes and learn and grow so you can make your next relationship even better. There are tons of specific reasons why people break up! But if you think that you’re “unloveable,” or tell yourself that the relationship was “a failure,” then you may get stuck in a morass of negative feelings. But it’s not even true that the relationship was a failure.” That’s All-or-Nothing Thinking, since all relationships are a mixture of more or less successful aspects. You could even tell yourself that a “failed” relationship was a partial success, since you successfully learned that this isn’t the person you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. What’s in it for you to give up Overgeneralization and All-or-Nothing Thinking, as well as the concepts of being a “worthwhile” or “worthless” human being? That’s a decision each person can make. There are benefits as well as problems with these ways of thinking. For example, let’s say you’re depressed and think of yourself as “defective.” This is a common negative thought, and it is based on the idea that a human being could be more or less worthwhile, or thinking that your "self" can be judged or rated. So, you could do two Cost-Benefit Analyses. * * First, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a “defective” human being. Then balance the advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale, assigning the larger number to the list that seems more important or desirable. * Second, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a human being with defects, and once again balance the list of advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale. This is just a subtle change in semantics, but the emotional implications can sometimes be pretty powerful. As I mentioned at the top, philosophical debates are just debates. Fun, perhaps, but not terribly useful. I’m more interested in magic, or miracles. That’s what happens at the moment of profound change, which can ONLY happen by focusing on one specific moment when you felt upset and needed help. When you do that, everything becomes radically different, and real change can occur. And at that magic moment of change, the solutions to all of the problems of philosophy will often suddenly become crystal clear. Or, to put it differently, the philosophical debates will suddenly become, without meaning to sound harsh, almost a waste of previous time. Our current semi-feral cat loves my wife, but is only starting to trust me, so I’ve been working at gaining her trust and learning to understand her non-verbal and somewhat complex efforts to communicate. Yesterday she roller over on her back and stretch out her front and back paws to expose her tummy to the max, and she let me pet her tummy for quite a long time, purring loudly the whole time. I don’t car…
1 hr 2 mins
Women Who Travel
Women Who Travel
Condé Nast Traveler
The Books Helping Us Escape Right Now
There may be no better time than winter to cozy up, ideally by a fire, with a stack of books and a cup of coffee (or something a little stronger). This particular winter, though, the escape and education we find through books will be even more necessary. Whether you're picking up books for yourself or sending hefty hardcovers to family and friends as holiday gifts, we have some suggestions that will distract, entertain, and inform—all by female writers spread across the world. (Translated Japanese authors were surprisingly popular this episode.) Joining us to share their favorite recent reads are Riverhead Books' associate publisher Jynne Dilling-Martin and Kalima DeSuze, activist and founder of the Cafe con Libros bookstore in Brooklyn.  Here's a full list of what we talked about: Oreo, by Fran Ross Lobizona, by Romina Garber The Fifth Season, by N.K. Jemisin The Memory Police, by Yoko Ogawa Convenience Store Woman, by Suyaka Murata Tokyo Ueno Station, by Yu Miri The Custom of the Country, by Edith Wharton The Lying Life of Adults, by Elena Ferrante The Neapolitan Novels, by Elena Ferrante The Japanese Table, by Sofia Hellsten Luster, by Raven Leilani Hurricane Season, by Fernanda Melchor Read a transcription of the episode here: https://www.cntraveler.com/story/the-books-helping-us-escape-right-now-women-who-travel-podcast Follow Kalima's Cafe con Libros: @cafeconlibros_bk Follow Jynne: @jynnnne Follow Lale: @lalehannah Follow Meredith: @ohheytheremere All products featured on Condé Nast Traveler are independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
38 mins
Ask Kati Anything!
Ask Kati Anything!
Kati Morton
ep.37 "I Was An Emotionally Neglected Child & Teenager" | AKA
Audience questions for Ask Kati Anything ep.37 * Hi Kati, what does a healthy attachment to your therapist feel like for the client? I am constantly wondering whether my attachment is healthy, for example, is it okay to be excited to tell them something that has happened to... * Hi Kati! I’m just curious to know if therapists “stalk” their patients on social media? I would find it so tempting to want to know more about my patients if I was a therapist and I feel like I would want to look through their Instagrams and... * Hi, Kati! I have a question. I’m 21, and I’ve suffered from depression and anxiety for several years. I’ve tried therapy on and off starting when I was 14. I would always just talk with a therapist about how I was feeling, but it never really went anywhere. I eventually stopped because it wasn’t helping. I feel... * Hello Kati, Do you think “birth order” may play a role in mental illness, and have you seen any trends in your counseling sessions? (such as depressed middle children, eldest children facing too much pressure, youngest who might have been smothered) I’m... * Hi Kati! My therapist and I both independently came to the conclusion that I was emotionally neglected as a child and teenager, but almost a year later I'm still struggling to see how it could have been bad enough to cause such severe mental... * Dear Kati, Why do I feel the need to google or research things? Whenever a topic or item is posed that could be relatively related to me I find myself compulsively looking it up. I’ll spend hours reading about a topic and get a brief sense of relief, however... * Dear Kati, How can I experience the emotional charge of trauma memories at the "right time"? My brain is very protective of me; it still treats the trauma as if... * Hey Kati, what is the difference between social anxiety disorder and avoidant personality disorder? What do you have to work on with clients with AvPD vs... * Hi Kati, why do I miss the old times when I felt bad and can't accept that it's good that I don't self-harm anymore. I miss feeling bad and that's crazy... * Hi Kati! How do you take care of your own mental health when having to be a caretaker for your parent that has a chronic illness? I’m only 23 and feel completely burnt out from having to take on all of the household chores... *Connecting with Kati* * *Are u ok? *Kati's book is in stores now * *Kati's Amazon Suggestions* * *PATREON** *is a great way* *to help me support the creation of mental health videos. * *Journaling Club* - On Tuesday & Friday Kati posts a journal prompt to help keep you motivated and working on yourself!  *Opinions That Don't Matter!* (Kati's second podcast) * *video version*  * *audio version* *ONLINE THERAPY** *I do not currently offer online therapy.  BetterHelp can connect you with a licensed, online counselor. I receive commissions on referrals to BetterHelp. I only recommend services I know and trust. *BUSINESS EMAIL*  linnea@toneymedia.com *MAIL*  PO Box #665 1223 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90403 *PLEASE READ* If you or someone you know is in immediate danger, please call a local emergency telephone number or go immediately to the nearest emergency room. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/katimorton)
1 hr 16 mins
The Lucas Rockwood Show
The Lucas Rockwood Show
Lucas Rockwood
439: Mindfulness Addiction with Dr. Jud Brewer
Mindfulness a Solution for Addiction? Dr. Jud Brewer ------ If we define addiction as continued behavior despite adverse consequences, we all have cause for concern. Perhaps you’re up so late watching Netflix that you make a mistake at work that costs you your job; maybe your pornography compulsion blocks real intimacy with your partner and derails your marriage; or maybe your online gambling leaves you with maxed out credit cards. It all sounds ridiculous until you focus the lens on your own life, open up your definition of what addiction means, and immediately discover that you too have maladaptive behaviors that might warrant change. On this week’s podcast, you’ll meet an addiction psychiatrist who helps people use mindfulness on a path toward balance. Listen & Learn: * How to know if you’re addicted? * How to analyse the trigger + behavior + results * Why you should focus on immediate experience (instead of long term) * How to start by knowing thyself Links & Resources * Dr Jud’s Website ABOUT OUR GUEST Dr. Jud Brewer is an Addiction Psychiatrist and the author of The Craving Mind and the creator of a number of mindfulness apps. He is director of research and innovation at the Mindfulness Center at Brown University, and the executive medical director of behavioral health at Sharecare. Nutritional Tip of the Week: * Melatonin for Sleep Got Questions? * Submit your question: yogabody.com/asklucas/ Like the Show? * Leave us a Review on iTunes
39 mins
Psychology In Seattle Podcast
Psychology In Seattle Podcast
Kirk Honda
Attachment Theory Emails (Part 2)
Dr. Kirk answers patron emails about attachment. Become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/PsychologyInSeattle Get merch: https://teespring.com/stores/psychology-in-seattle Email: https://www.psychologyinseattle.com/contact The Psychology In Seattle Podcast ® Disclaimer: The content provided is for educational, informational, and entertainment purposes only. Nothing here constitutes personal or professional consultation, therapy, diagnosis, or creates a counselor-client relationship. Topics discussed may generate differing points of view. If you participate (by being a guest, submitting a question, or commenting) you must do so with the knowledge that we cannot control reactions or responses from others, which may not agree with you or feel unfair. Your participation on this site is at your own risk, accepting full responsibility for any liability or harm that may result. Anything you write here may be used for discussion or endorsement of the podcast. Opinions and views expressed by the host and guest hosts are personal views. Although, we take precautions and fact check, they should not be considered facts and the opinions may change. Opinions posted by participants (such as comments) are not those of the hosts. Readers should not rely on any information found here and should perform due diligence before taking any action. For a more extensive description of factors for you to consider, please see www.psychologyinseattle.com
1 min
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