068 - Why Curiosity is the Key to a Successful Career — with Philip Van Dusen
Play • 1 hr 1 min

Is there a tried and true path to creative success? Some say follow your passion, but that’s not what worked for this week’s guest. In this episode, Chris talks with YouTube design trend forecaster, Philip Van Dusen, about how following his curiosity led him to where to he needed to be.

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UI Narrative: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
UI Narrative: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
Tolu Ajayi
Balancing Being a Parent While Making a Career Pivot | Terri Rodriguez-Hong
Episode 35 Show Notes: Becoming a parent is most likely the most challenging job you'll ever have. Terri Rodriguez-Hong shares her story of getting into UX Design and encourages parents looking to make the career pivot. Mentions: Contact Out (Chrome plug-in) https://contactout.com/ Online communities UX Her - Woman of Color product design group https://community.uxher.com Where are the black designers - Slack group https://wherearetheblackdesigners.com Black By Design https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12077430/ All Black Creatives https://www.allblackcreatives.com Hire Black https://hireblacksummit.com Designer Hangout https://designerhangout.co Designer’s Guild https://www.facebook.com/groups/designguild Terri’s LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/flaxenink/ Terri’s Twitter https://twitter.com/flaxenink Terri’s Website https://www.terrirodriguezhong.com Podcast Info: Transcripts available on episode web page. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Stitcher, and Spotify. RSS feed: https://uinarrative.libsyn.com/rss Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review if you like what you hear. Announcements: Join the UI Narrative Email Club to be the first to hear about weekly blog posts and exclusive podcast recaps. You can sign up at uinarrative.com/emailclub. Want to improve your UI design? Learn more at uinarrative.com/gradingsystem. Let’s Connect: Have a question for me? Email me at hello@uinarrative.com. Let’s connect! #uinarrative Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn @uinarrative Twitter @uinarrativeco
48 min
YouTube Creators Hub
YouTube Creators Hub
Dusty Porter
242: What It means To Be A YouTube Creator With Hunner From Hunner's Designs
242: What It means To Be A YouTube Creator With Hunner From Hunner's Designs This week we are joined by Hunner from Hunner's Designs on YouTube. About Hunner: After building a new house as a first-time homebuyer in 2019, Hunner established Hunner’s Designs as a YouTube channel to document the home designing journey in early 2020. While navigating how to produce quality videos, Hunner has shared it all on YouTube, ranging from DIY projects to tips for decorating. Hunner's mission is to help homeowners create a beautiful home, no matter their budget. The most popular tutorial has been the DIY Fireplace Makeover with several families recreating the project in their own homes. After seeing the impact of designing beautiful spaces, Hunner has turned Hunner's Designs into more than a YouTube channel and now offers 1-on-1 design services to help others create the home of their dreams! Try TUBEBUDDY for FREE for 30 days with this link! Go here if you want to submit your YouTube Channel to be a potential guest on the podcast. Support the show on Patreon here for day-to-day interaction with myself and the community on discord. Connect With Hunner Here: YouTube Channel /// Instagram Links Discussed In This Episode TubeBuddy – A tool that makes your YouTube Life EASIER and Helps grow your channel. CLICK HERE for a FREE 30 DAY TRIAL. Fiverr – Hire the right people for the jobs you need to make your YouTube life and workflow easier! HotContent – Allow Natalie and her experienced team to help you on your YouTube journey by hiring a YouTube coach! Bluehost – If you need a website use this link to get a Free Domain Name and a great deal on hosting
33 min
Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Mark Des Cotes
Presenting With The 10-20-30 Rule - RD248
Follow the 10-20-30 Rule for great presentations. Have you ever heard of the 10-20-30 Rule? It’s more often called the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint, but the principle applies elsewhere as well. This Rule was coined several years ago by Guy Kawasaki, a venture capitalist who sat through dozens of presentation pitches regularly. It was his job to listen to people pitch their business ideas, and after years of this, he noted that the best presentations, the ones that are more likely to close the deal, all followed a similar format, which he coined the 10-20-30 Rule. And this Rule is simple. • 10 Slides • 20 Minute Presentation • 30 Point minimum size font. That’s it. According to Kawasaki, this setup gives you the best chance to impact the person or people you’re presenting positively. Kawasaki was talking about people pitching business ideas to venture capitalists. But the same principle applies to you, a designer pitching your ideas to clients. Let’s break it down the 10-20-30 Rule. Rule #1: 10 Slides. Kawasaki pointed out that it’s tough for someone to comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting. If you try, you’re more than most likely to confuse them. Follow the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid.) Limiting your presentation to only 10 slides or 10 sheets or pages does just that. Break your presentation down into 10 points, one per slide. Maybe something like this. • Slide 1: Your interpretation of who the client is. • Slide 2: Identifying the client’s competition. • Slide 3: The Problem the client is facing. • Slide 4: The Solution you are proposing. • Slide 5: How your solution solves the client’s problem. • Slide 6: Examples of your solution in place. • Slide 7: Projections and outcomes from Implementing your solution. • Slide 8: Timeline for the project. • Slide 9: Cost of the project. • Slide 10: Summary and call to action.  This example uses a maximum of 10 slides, but you can do it in less, then all the better.  Rule #2: 20 Minutes. It doesn’t matter if you are allotted 30 minutes or an hour. Your actual presentation should take no more than 20 minutes. If you can’t present your idea within that time frame, you’re doing something wrong. Have you heard of TED Talks? Did you know that TED Talks have a maximum length of 18 minutes? TED organizers chose this time length based on neuroscience research that says 18 minutes is long enough for a speaker to flesh out their idea and short enough for a listener to take it in, digest what they are hearing, and understand all of the vital information. Not only that, but they know that shorter presentations require you to edit things down to the most important and relevant material.  If you have more time allotted to you, use it for introductions and setting up your equipment. You should also leave time for Q&A after your presentation. Plus, you never know when an emergency might arise and cut the meeting short. 20 minutes is the ideal time to keep someone’s interest in what you are showing them. Longer than 20 minutes, and you risk their mind wandering to other things and possibly missing critical points you’re trying to make. Rule #3: 30-Pt Font. As a designer, I trust you know that slides or presentation papers are most effective when they contain very little wording. I’m hoping I don’t have to explain that to you. This 10-20-30 Rule was written for people pitching a product or business idea, not for experienced designers. But just the same, it’s something to remember when you create your presentation slides or handouts. Using a larger point size forces you to cut back on unnecessary verbiage. The only reason to have a smaller type on a slide is to cram on more text. But by doing so, your client may think you’re not familiar with your material and that you need your slides to act as a teleprompter. And that, in turn, may make them feel like you are not invested in them. Not to mention, the more type you have on a slide, the more the client will focus on reading it and not listening to what you’re saying. You know what I mean, we’ve all done it before—reading ahead while ignoring the presenter. Avoid this by using 30 point or larger fonts. Forget the bullet list and instead, tell your clients the key points. It will mean much more coming out of your mouth than words on a screen or sheet of paper. As a comparison, Steve Jobs, a great presenter in his time, insisted on a 96-point type on all his presentation slides. If it’s good enough for a multi-billion company, it should be good enough for you. Bonus As a bonus to his 10-20-30 Rule, Guy Kawasaki also said that the most persuasive presentations he’s sat through, typically used white type on a black or dark coloured background.  The way he puts it is, anyone can put black type on a white background. It’s the default in all programs. However, white type on a dark background is something you have to conscientiously, and shows that you’ve put effort into your presentation. Not to mention that white type on a dark background looks classier and is easier to read. Don’t believe me? Think of movie credits. How often do you see black credits on a white background? Hardly ever. You can learn from that. Do you follow the 10-20-30 Rule? Let me know by leaving a comment for this episode. Tip of the week Capture Full-Screen websites on your iPhone. If you are an iPhone user there's a nifty feature you may not know about. The ability to take full-page screenshots of webpages. In Safari, take a screenshot of any webpage. Edit the screenshot. At the top of the page, you can toggle between "Screen" and "Full Page". Selecting "Full Page" allows you to save the entire webpage as a PDF to your Files folder. This is a quick and easy way to capture the mobile view of any webpage.
17 min
Marketing Trends
Marketing Trends
Mission
Leveling Up: Simple Steps Marketers Can Take To Move Their Careers to the Next Level
Eric Siu likes to say he was never successful athletically. And while he might have struggled between the lines, there was one arena in which he thrived: the digital one. Eric always found comfort when it came to video games, where for years, he dominated as a successful esports player. For Eric, success in gaming was rooted in the mindset that failure was his and his alone, but that regardless of the struggle, the next level was always within reach..That mantra is something he still follows today. _“I think marketers have to understand that there are levels to everything, and _there are_ levels of your career, _there are_ levels to when you're working out, and _there are_ levels of games. If you can reframe life into a game, if you can reframe business into a game, it just becomes a lot easier and a lot more fun.”_ Eric is an investor, founder and advisor to companies. He is also the Chairman of the digital marketing agency, Single Grain. On this episode of Marketing Trends, Eric dives into what it means to have a leveling-up mindset and some of the steps that marketers can take to move up in their careers. Plus, Eric details the two key areas marketers should be honing in on when it comes to optimizing their website. Main Takeaways: * Built for Speed: When you’re trying to optimize your website for search, you have to be thinking about the things that matter most, which are content and links. Part of having good content is having a great user experience, and that means having a fast website. Always be thinking about how you can make your website faster and easier to consume. * The Right Mix: It’s important when you are sourcing talent to find the right mix of employees who can excel in multiple areas. It might sound simple, but it’s not. Most marketers are not great product people and the same can be said for product personnel. Look for people who can manage both sides of the coin. * The Long Game: At the end of the day, you have to always be thinking about long-term success and not what is happening in the short-term. Constantly be thinking about where you can get the most untapped potential and then leverage that into something that will benefit you in the long-term. --- Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world’s number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. To learn more or subscribe to our weekly newsletter, visit MarketingTrends.com.
37 min
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