030 - The State of Design Education — with Nick Campbell (Pt. 3)
Play • 1 hr 12 min

In this episode, Chris and Nick chat about the differences between a fully scalable product oriented model (Greyscalegorilla) vs. mentorship approach (MoGraph Mentor) and everything in between.

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Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Mark Des Cotes
Presenting With The 10-20-30 Rule - RD248
Follow the 10-20-30 Rule for great presentations. Have you ever heard of the 10-20-30 Rule? It’s more often called the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint, but the principle applies elsewhere as well. This Rule was coined several years ago by Guy Kawasaki, a venture capitalist who sat through dozens of presentation pitches regularly. It was his job to listen to people pitch their business ideas, and after years of this, he noted that the best presentations, the ones that are more likely to close the deal, all followed a similar format, which he coined the 10-20-30 Rule. And this Rule is simple. • 10 Slides • 20 Minute Presentation • 30 Point minimum size font. That’s it. According to Kawasaki, this setup gives you the best chance to impact the person or people you’re presenting positively. Kawasaki was talking about people pitching business ideas to venture capitalists. But the same principle applies to you, a designer pitching your ideas to clients. Let’s break it down the 10-20-30 Rule. Rule #1: 10 Slides. Kawasaki pointed out that it’s tough for someone to comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting. If you try, you’re more than most likely to confuse them. Follow the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid.) Limiting your presentation to only 10 slides or 10 sheets or pages does just that. Break your presentation down into 10 points, one per slide. Maybe something like this. • Slide 1: Your interpretation of who the client is. • Slide 2: Identifying the client’s competition. • Slide 3: The Problem the client is facing. • Slide 4: The Solution you are proposing. • Slide 5: How your solution solves the client’s problem. • Slide 6: Examples of your solution in place. • Slide 7: Projections and outcomes from Implementing your solution. • Slide 8: Timeline for the project. • Slide 9: Cost of the project. • Slide 10: Summary and call to action.  This example uses a maximum of 10 slides, but you can do it in less, then all the better.  Rule #2: 20 Minutes. It doesn’t matter if you are allotted 30 minutes or an hour. Your actual presentation should take no more than 20 minutes. If you can’t present your idea within that time frame, you’re doing something wrong. Have you heard of TED Talks? Did you know that TED Talks have a maximum length of 18 minutes? TED organizers chose this time length based on neuroscience research that says 18 minutes is long enough for a speaker to flesh out their idea and short enough for a listener to take it in, digest what they are hearing, and understand all of the vital information. Not only that, but they know that shorter presentations require you to edit things down to the most important and relevant material.  If you have more time allotted to you, use it for introductions and setting up your equipment. You should also leave time for Q&A after your presentation. Plus, you never know when an emergency might arise and cut the meeting short. 20 minutes is the ideal time to keep someone’s interest in what you are showing them. Longer than 20 minutes, and you risk their mind wandering to other things and possibly missing critical points you’re trying to make. Rule #3: 30-Pt Font. As a designer, I trust you know that slides or presentation papers are most effective when they contain very little wording. I’m hoping I don’t have to explain that to you. This 10-20-30 Rule was written for people pitching a product or business idea, not for experienced designers. But just the same, it’s something to remember when you create your presentation slides or handouts. Using a larger point size forces you to cut back on unnecessary verbiage. The only reason to have a smaller type on a slide is to cram on more text. But by doing so, your client may think you’re not familiar with your material and that you need your slides to act as a teleprompter. And that, in turn, may make them feel like you are not invested in them. Not to mention, the more type you have on a slide, the more the client will focus on reading it and not listening to what you’re saying. You know what I mean, we’ve all done it before—reading ahead while ignoring the presenter. Avoid this by using 30 point or larger fonts. Forget the bullet list and instead, tell your clients the key points. It will mean much more coming out of your mouth than words on a screen or sheet of paper. As a comparison, Steve Jobs, a great presenter in his time, insisted on a 96-point type on all his presentation slides. If it’s good enough for a multi-billion company, it should be good enough for you. Bonus As a bonus to his 10-20-30 Rule, Guy Kawasaki also said that the most persuasive presentations he’s sat through, typically used white type on a black or dark coloured background.  The way he puts it is, anyone can put black type on a white background. It’s the default in all programs. However, white type on a dark background is something you have to conscientiously, and shows that you’ve put effort into your presentation. Not to mention that white type on a dark background looks classier and is easier to read. Don’t believe me? Think of movie credits. How often do you see black credits on a white background? Hardly ever. You can learn from that. Do you follow the 10-20-30 Rule? Let me know by leaving a comment for this episode. Tip of the week Capture Full-Screen websites on your iPhone. If you are an iPhone user there's a nifty feature you may not know about. The ability to take full-page screenshots of webpages. In Safari, take a screenshot of any webpage. Edit the screenshot. At the top of the page, you can toggle between "Screen" and "Full Page". Selecting "Full Page" allows you to save the entire webpage as a PDF to your Files folder. This is a quick and easy way to capture the mobile view of any webpage.
17 min
The Think Marketing Podcast
The Think Marketing Podcast
Think Media
055: The 3 Hottest 🔥 Digital Marketing Trends to WATCH OUT For in 2021
In this episode, Eric Siu breaks down the 3 Hottest Digital Marketing trends to WATCH OUT for in 2021. ****** ⚡️FREE CLASS⚡️ Watch our FREE YouTube Masterclass here ➡️ http://ThinkMasterclass.com 📒 Show Notes and Resources 📒 📘 Leveling Up: How To Master The Game of Life    Hardcover ➡️ https://amzn.to/3uKZyJp    Digital ➡️ https://amzn.to/3uKZyJp 📘 Leveling Up with Eric Siu Podcast       ➡️ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/leveling-up-with-eric-siu/id741544976 Our mission is to help 10,000 purpose-driven entrepreneurs go full-time doing what they love and making an impact through the power of video. We have created an entire part of our company to help equip you in this mission. Here are the ways to work with us here at Think: ✅FREE CLASS: Watch our FREE YouTube class here: http://ThinkMasterclass.com ✅CONFERENCE: Join us for the #1 video marketing conference in the US for entrepreneurs: http://GrowWithVideoLive.com ✅COURSES/ COACHING / MASTERMINDS: Learn about our online courses and in-person events by talking to one of our Think Master Coaches. Grab a spot on our calendar for a 15 min discovery call: http://TalkWithThink.com Connect with Sean Cannell on Social Media http://seancannell.com https://www.linkedin.com/in/seancannell/ https://twitter.com/seancannell https://instagram.com/seancannell https://www.facebook.com/seanthinks Connect with Heather Torres on Social Media https://instagram.com/mrsheathertorres/ https://twitter.com/hrtorres https://www.youtube.com/user/hiktorres Music provided by MusicBed. Start your free trial here:  http://bit.ly/MusicBedThinkMedia Read through our YouTube disclaimer policy here: https://www.seancannell.com/youtube-disclaimer
29 min
YouTube Creators Hub
YouTube Creators Hub
Dusty Porter
242: What It means To Be A YouTube Creator With Hunner From Hunner's Designs
242: What It means To Be A YouTube Creator With Hunner From Hunner's Designs This week we are joined by Hunner from Hunner's Designs on YouTube. About Hunner: After building a new house as a first-time homebuyer in 2019, Hunner established Hunner’s Designs as a YouTube channel to document the home designing journey in early 2020. While navigating how to produce quality videos, Hunner has shared it all on YouTube, ranging from DIY projects to tips for decorating. Hunner's mission is to help homeowners create a beautiful home, no matter their budget. The most popular tutorial has been the DIY Fireplace Makeover with several families recreating the project in their own homes. After seeing the impact of designing beautiful spaces, Hunner has turned Hunner's Designs into more than a YouTube channel and now offers 1-on-1 design services to help others create the home of their dreams! Try TUBEBUDDY for FREE for 30 days with this link! Go here if you want to submit your YouTube Channel to be a potential guest on the podcast. Support the show on Patreon here for day-to-day interaction with myself and the community on discord. Connect With Hunner Here: YouTube Channel /// Instagram Links Discussed In This Episode TubeBuddy – A tool that makes your YouTube Life EASIER and Helps grow your channel. CLICK HERE for a FREE 30 DAY TRIAL. Fiverr – Hire the right people for the jobs you need to make your YouTube life and workflow easier! HotContent – Allow Natalie and her experienced team to help you on your YouTube journey by hiring a YouTube coach! Bluehost – If you need a website use this link to get a Free Domain Name and a great deal on hosting
33 min
Design Better Podcast
Design Better Podcast
InVisionApp, Inc
Netflix's Steve Johnson and Rochelle King: Making great stories accessible
If you’re anything like us, you’ve been watching more than your fair share of Netflix this past year. And with such great original content, from The Queen’s Gambit to more obscure shows like Midnight Diner, we were curious what it takes from a product design perspective to create and deliver these shows to a massive audience, in a way that’s accessible not only to audiences here in the US, but all around the world. So we sat down to chat with Steve Johnson, Vice President of Design, and Rochelle King, Vice President of Creative Production at Netflix, to talk about how they approach inclusive design for a global audience, how they use a data-informed rather than data-driven product strategy, and why looking for passion rather than for credentials might be the key to your next great hire. This is the last episode of Season Five of the Design Better Podcast. But don’t worry, Season Six is just around the corner, where we’ll be sharing interviews with guests like bestselling author Dan Pink, who will teach us how to use persuasion to be better at our jobs, and Professor Sara Seager, an astrophysicist and planetary scientist whose research on exoplanets can shed light on how we can be better collaborators here on Earth. Also, in-between seasons we’re going to do a bonus Q&A show, where you’ll have a chance to record your questions about design, creativity, leadership, or any of the topics we cover here on the show and we’ll do our best to answer them. Just head over to http://dbtr.co/ama and fill out the short survey there to submit your question. Takeaways: * Learn about the ROI for inclusive design * Hear how the design team at Netflix approaches the power dynamics between product and design * Understand how to prioritize and say no to work that won’t impact the business
52 min
UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
Jane Portman
Better Done Than Perfect. Customer Success for Infoproducts with Alex Hillman
Today we’re bringing you the first episode of Better Done Than Perfect’s Season 2. Join us for a talk with Alex Hillman, founder of Stacking The Bricks and author of The Tiny MBA. We discuss the company’s conception and philosophy, how they handle customer service, what makes a great course, and so much more. Please head over to the episode page for the detailed recap and key takeaways.Show notes * Stacking The Bricks — Alex’s company together with Amy Hoy * Noko, EveryTimeZone — products by Amy Hoy, Alex’s partner * 30x500 — Alex and Amy’s flagship product * Indy Hall — Alex’s famous coworking space, now a remote work community * Just F#*!ing Ship — a book by Amy and Alex * Write Useful Books — a book & tool by Rob Fitzpatrick * UI Breakfast Episode 206: Writing Useful Books with Rob Fitzpatrick * Bear — a note-taking app * The Essential Podcasting Guide — a book by Craig Hewitt of Castos * Nathan Barry’s ConvertKit Academy * Mastering ConvertKit — a course by Brennan Dunn available at Double Your Freelancing Rate * Fundamental UI Design — a book Jane wrote for InVision (currently a free course) * BadAss: Making Users Awesome — a book by Kathy Sierra * Follow Alex on Twitter * The Tiny MBA — Alex’s book (use promocode BDTP20 at checkout for 20% off) Thanks for listening! If you found the episode useful, please spread the word about this new show on Twitter mentioning @userlist, or leave us a review on iTunes.Sponsor This show is brought to you by Userlist — the best way for SaaS founders to send onboarding emails, segment your users based on events, and see where your customers get stuck in the product. Start your free trial today at userlist.com. _Interested in sponsoring an episode?_ Learn more here.Leave a Review Reviews are hugely important because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes. Here’s how.
1 hr 2 min
Marketing Trends
Marketing Trends
Mission
Driving Value, Conversions and Engagements With In-App Advertisements
Let's be frank: the app store is overwhelming. There are far too many options and too many barely-differentiated apps. When everything looks and feels the same, how can you possibly stick out? The key, you already know, is advertising. But these days you can’t just put out a banner ad, or stick an ad on a landing page or a newsletter and expect to see success. You need strategies that go one step beyond just getting a download, but instead lead to deeper conversions. To do that, you need to do a bit of _Inception-_style marketing. _“When you have millions of apps that consumers can choose from, being able to advertise to users and other apps to create awareness and get them interested in engaging in our app becomes super important. You can't just create a good app and throw it out there and hope for the best. You really need to support that through effective advertising. And if you've got an app, you're going to want to be advertising your app inside of other apps.”_ Those are the words of Dennis Mink, the Vice President of Marketing at Liftoff, a one-stop-shop for programmatic user acquisition. On this episode of Marketing Trends, Dennis details effective strategies marketers should be using to get the most out of their apps, and why your KPIs have to be more about conversions and engagements and less about downloads. Main Takeaways: * What’s the Value For Me?: When designing advertisements to promote your apps, your designs should be less flashy and more focused on how your app actually works, the benefits of the apps, and the value the app is going to bring to the user. * Just Do Your Job: The job of a mobile advertisement is no longer simply to convince users to download an app. The role of an ad has shifted where the main responsibility is now to convince users to actively convert inside the app. * Let’s Get Technical: When deploying machine learning tactics, you need to focus on a few main things. The first is that the data that you are feeding your algorithm is clean. And the second is that your techniques are helping you accomplish certain goals, like driving in-app engagement and conversions and doing those two things at scale. --- Marketing Trends podcast is brought to you by Salesforce. Discover marketing built on the world’s number one CRM: Salesforce. Put your customer at the center of every interaction. Automate engagement with each customer. And build your marketing strategy around the entire customer journey. Salesforce. We bring marketing and engagement together. Learn more at salesforce.com/marketing. To learn more or subscribe to our weekly newsletter, visit MarketingTrends.com.
45 min
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