The Art of Strategy
40 min

Your life is a constant stream of decisions: what career to follow, how to manage a business, whom to marry, how to bring up children, whether to run for president, how to communicate with a colleague and how to react when life slaps you in the face. The common element is that you are not in a vacuum. Instead, you are surrounded by the world that interacts with any decision you make. The context of the situation you find yourself in matters.

Game theory is the process of modelling the strategic interaction between players in a situation containing set rules and outcomes. The Art Of Strategy breaks down game theory to help you in practical real life situations.

Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast
Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast
Michelle McQuaid
Can You Plan The Future? Podcast with Margaret Heffernan
In this week’s podcast, we explore the difference between complicated and complex systems, and how we can help people to care for their wellbeing as they navigate unpredictable and challenging work environments. Connect with Dr. Margaret Heffernan: * http://mheffernan.com/ [free_product_purchase id="96041"] You’ll Learn: * [02:33] - Margaret explains why studies suggest we can only confidently plan the future in workplaces for approximately 150 days at a time. * [06:29] - Margaret helps us explore the difference between a complicated world and a complex world and what this means for caring for wellbeing in workplaces. * [11:39] - Margaret provides an example of how workplaces can help people successfully navigate complexity. * [18:16] - Margaret outlines the capabilities we need to prioritize in workplaces to help people more confidently navigate complexity. * [22:03] - Margaret explains why thinking of ourselves as artists rather than managers may serve us better in the future in workplaces. * [27:47] - Margaret explores why thinking of ourselves as artists rather than managers may make us more resilient at work. * [31:22] - Margaret takes on the lightning round. Thanks for listening! * MPPW Podcast on Facebook * TED Talk - Barry Schwartz: Our Loss of Wisdom Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them. And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing. Until next time, take care! Thank you, Margaret!
36 min
Growth Mindset Podcast
Growth Mindset Podcast
Sam Harris
147: Building people that build startups - David Brown, CEO Techstars
David Brown David is a serial entrepreneur who has founded three startups and been involved with two others. David is one of the original founders of Pinpoint Technologies, Inc. which is now part of ZOLL Medical Corporation and provides solutions to the emergency medical servicesmarket. David later co-founded Techstars along with David Cohen, Brad Feld, and Jared Polis. He has been an investor and advisor to Techstars since inception. In 2013, he joined Techstars in a more active role as President. Connect with David on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/dbrown/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/dbrown) No Vision All Drive with David Brown (https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/no-vision-all-drive-david-brown/1134407791?ean=9781119632801) Top Tip Failure is the best teacher The quickest road to success is to possess an attitude towards failure. In order to grow, you need failure. Understand and accept failure as a part of life. We often experience that learning is more effective in failure than in success because failure teaches us what works and what does not. When we embrace our strengths or limitations – we become better. People are often so afraid they’ll fail at something that they don’t try. Don’t be one of those people. Everyone has failed at something in his or her life, but not everyone tries again and again. World hard every day to reach your goals and you will. Keep going and you will find success. Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: David Brown.
35 min
Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of World-Class Performers
Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of World-Class Performers
Tim Ferriss
BJ Miller
This episode features the profile of BJ Miller from Tools of Titans, which is now available as an audiobook. This chapter's narrators are Kaleo Griffith (bio) and Ray Porter (profile). To check out the full audiobook of Tools of Titans with 100+ chapters, visit audible.com/ferriss. BJ Miller (@bjmillermd) is a hospice and palliative care physician who has worked in many settings, inpatient, outpatient, and home, and now sees patients and families at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. BJ also acted as executive director for the Zen Hospice Project for five years, learning about the administration of health care and how difficult it can be for patients and families to find the care they need. He speaks all over the country and beyond on the theme of living well in the face of death. He has been featured in The New York Times and interviewed by Oprah Winfrey, Tim Ferriss, and Krista Tippett. BJ lives in Mill Valley with his chosen fur family, Maysie, the Muffin Man, and Darkness, and loves exploring nature — including human — especially from any two-wheeled vehicle (or four). *** The audiobooks of Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors can be found at audible.com/ferriss If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/email. Follow Tim: Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferriss Facebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
16 min
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
128. How to Build Products That Create Change, An Interview with Matt Wallaert
Today I am so excited to introduce you to Matt Wallaert, author of Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. One of my favorite quotes from Matt is one that shows how we are kindred spirits. He says, “If behavior is your outcome and science your process, you’re a behavioral scientist. No Ph.D. required.” Matt was one of the first behavioral scientists to leave academia to work in industry, which he has done for over 15 years now. He was head of behavioral science at Microsoft, the first chief behavioral officer in the healthcare industry while at Clover Health, and has done tons of awesome projects along the way (some of which you will learn about in today’s episode). During our conversation, we discuss lots of concepts that have past episodes on the show, including those on anchoring, relativity, how to finally change your behavior, how to experiment, and many more Show Notes: * [00:43] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Matt Wallaert, author of Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. * [03:28] Matt shares his story and how he got interested in behavioral science. * [05:06] After taking a second psychology class in college, he became addicted to science and started doing a lot of applied work. * [07:56] He left Clover Health in March and ended up moving to California for a year of adventure. * [09:41] He has decided in his next role that he wants to spend most of his time pivoting an organization to behavioral science. * [11:01] Advances in data science and user research have prepared younger project managers to fully embrace behavioral science. * [13:12] People often don’t think of the implications of the things that they say. * [13:30] Every industry has its own beliefs about what can’t be changed (listen to episode 126 for Melina’s tips on fixing this in your organization). * [14:51] Behavioral science can be used in good ways and in bad ways (ethics matter!). * [16:49] It is really hard to write a complete behavioral statement from the beginning. * [17:17] Matt shares about the GetRaised project he worked on. * [19:04] Bias creeps in when we start to do ratings of performance. * [20:28] The difference between junior behavioral scientists and more senior behavioral scientists is just experience. Anyone can learn the framework. * [22:08] A lot of communication is just quick analogy making. It is the ability to find out what someone is interested in and relate that to the thing you are teaching. * [24:37] Our brain is using the same rules and concepts whether we are deciding to litter or choosing a brand of toothpaste. * [25:37] When you try to replicate a lab study in real life sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. The key is that you tried it small before you shared it with everybody. (Get Melina’s tips for creating your own experiments in episode 63.) * [26:47] Science is the testing of all assumptions. Diversity can help identify an assumption. * [28:08] Behavioral science is a lifestyle. * [28:59] Academic behavioral science is about the why of the way things are. Applied behavioral science is the changing of the way things are. * [30:20] Almost all misunderstandings across cultural and other kinds of borders are due to a misunderstanding of the pressures that affect that other persons’ life. It almost always makes sense if you understand the context. * [32:06] Melina shares Steve Wendel’s story about a fish in the sand (hear more from Steve in episode 116). * [34:33] It is easier to have a discussion with the people that we can relate to than to have a more difficult conversation. * [35:36] Matt says, “If behavior is your outcome and science your process, you’re a behavioral scientist. No Ph.D. required.” * [36:27] Behavioral science thrives when lots of people are doing it and doing it a little better every day. If it does not put behavior as an outcome, it is not behavioral science. * [37:05] Behavioral science is about creating a specific outcome in advance and then using science as a process. * [39:46] Get your own copy of Matt’s book, Start at the End: How to Build Products that Create Change. * [42:32] Don’t forget to take advantage of the year-end sale going on now. Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. * Special Year-End Sale 👈🏻🥳 Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Matt’s Website * Start at the End: How to Build Products That Create Change * Getraised * Matt on Twitter * Interview with Dan Ariely * Interview with Kwame Christian * Relativity * How to Finally Change Your Behavior (So it Sticks) * Biases Toward Novelty and Stories * How To Set Up Your Own Experiments * Anchoring & Adjustment * Change Management * Loss Aversion * Framing * Bikeshedding * Network Effect * Interview with Steve Wendel
44 min
Tribe of Mentors
Tribe of Mentors
Tim Ferriss
Naval Ravikant, Susan Cain, and Yuval Noah Harari
Please note that this episode originally aired on The Tim Ferriss Show podcast.  This episode features some of my favorite advice and profiles from Tribe of Mentors. Thousands of you have asked for years for the audiobook versions of Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors, and they are now both finally available at audible.com/ferriss. Today’s episode will focus on my first chapter in Tribe of Mentors, as well as the profiles of Naval Ravikant, Susan Cain, and Yuval Noah Harari. Just a few notes on the format before we dive in: I recorded the introduction and selected three fantastic, top-ranked narrators to handle the rest.  The short bios, which you will hear at the beginning of each profile, are read by Kaleo Griffith. Ray Porter reads my words as well as those of the male guests. The words of the female guests are performed by Thérèse Plummer. Tribe of Mentors is the ultimate choose-your-own-adventure book—a compilation of tools, tactics, and habits from more than 100 of the world’s top performers. From iconic entrepreneurs to elite athletes, from artists to billionaire investors, their short profiles can help you answer life’s most challenging questions, achieve extraordinary results, and transform your life. I am really happy with how the book turned out, and the universe helped me pull off some miracles for Tribe of Mentors (e.g., Ben Stiller; Temple Grandin; Ayaan Hirsi Ali; Yuval Noah Harari, whom you will hear in this episode; Arianna Huffington; Marc Benioff; Terry Crews; Dan Gable; and many more). It includes many of the people I grew up viewing as idols or demi-gods. So thanks, universe!  And if you only get one thing out of this book, let it be this: In a world where nobody really knows anything, you have the incredible freedom to continually reinvent yourself and forge new paths, no matter how strange. Embrace your weird self. There is no one right answer… only better questions. I wish you luck as you forge your own path. Please enjoy this episode, and if you’d like to listen to the other 100-plus profiles from Tribe of Mentors, please check out audible.com/ferriss.
1 hr
The SuperHuman Academy Podcast
The SuperHuman Academy Podcast
Jonathan Levi
Ep. 300: Finale Episode & Thank You
Greetings, Superfriends, and welcome to the 300th episode of the SuperHuman Academy Podcast - where, as you’ve probably already heard me mention in previous episodes, after nearly 6 years and 4.5 million downloads - it is my duty to inform you that this episode will be our last - at least for now. In this final chapter, I want to take a few moments to answer some of your questions, share with you how I’ve come to this decision, and let you all know what you can expect from me in the future. The first question that’s probably on everybody’s mind, I imagine, is this: Why would you stop a successful podcast? If you’ve been paying attention, you know that podcasting is at its all-time peak right now, with just about everybody in every market you can imagine getting into the medium. And it’s only expected to grow, with people consuming more and more podcasts every single year. Of course, a lot of these new shows are destined to be part of “the long tail” - never crossing more than a thousand downloads per episode. But SuperHuman Academy, since its inception, has been a reasonably successful show - earning thousands of downloads per episode consistently throughout its 6-year run. Add to this the fact that some of our best and most interesting guests and episodes have come out in just the last year - with quite a few “superstar” guests and life-changing episodes happening in 2020. Why, then, have I decided to bring all of this to a close?! In truth, there are a lot of reasons. First, there’s the “family” component. My wife and I just had our baby boy, and I’ve made the decision to clear off most of my calendar for a while to focus exclusively on this exciting and rewarding new adventure. The fact that I have the freedom to do this is a major blessing that I realize not many people enjoy - and I intend to take full advantage of it. But, as you can imagine, there is much more to the story than that. You see, when I first started this business - with nothing more than a simple Udemy course recorded with a webcam, it was intended to be a fun “side project” - a way to give back and earn a living while I searched for “the next big thing.” I could have never anticipated that I would be where I am today, employing a full team, with over 300,000 students worldwide, bestselling books, a successful podcast, certified coaches all over the world, etc. What was intended to be a fun, lifestyle-oriented “side business” in many ways became a runaway success - and my main focus for the better part of 7 years. All of that is well and good - I have no regrets whatsoever, and of course I consider myself extremely blessed for everything this journey has done for me and for those I’ve touched along the way. But, in all truth, somewhere between then and now, I lost sight of what was important to me. I spent a few solid years mingling with and learning from the smartest minds in the business. And yes, there were amazing times where everything “clicked” and we were on top of the world. But since then, there have also been years of struggling - often uphill - towards endless growth and expansion, without considering whether or not it would bring me happiness (spoiler alert: it didn’t). Ultimately, for the second time in my life, I found myself in a prison of my own making: working more hours than I wanted to, to build something that wasn’t even my dream. As a result of this, I learned a number of very valuable life lessons: first, there’s no happiness in living other people’s dreams. And second, there’s nothing more important than happiness - nothing. That’s why, when COVID-19 struck, and a few key team members took it as an opportunity to resign and start their own businesses, rather than fighting tooth and nail to rebuild, I instead chose to view this as a huge moment of awakening - and a huge opportunity. It’s funny, you know? Day in and day out in my courses, podcast, and in interviews, I talk about designing the life that best suits you, about living “a la carte” instead of “prix fixe,” and about how you can create your own unique lifestyle where you work as much or as little as you want to. And sure, in many ways, my life today reflects those values and ideas. But sometimes our own advice is the easiest to forget - or, as they say in Hebrew, sometimes, the shoemaker goes barefoot. When the spell of “constant growth” wore off, I was forced to look at the plain facts: while I love this business, I love all of you, and I’m forever grateful for this entire experience… continuing to grow this business bigger and better isn’t what makes me happy anymore. It doesn’t challenge me or excite me like it used to. It’s not what I feel compelled to do. And no amount of impact, press recognition, or money is going to change that. Similarly, another reason for stopping is that I sense that I’ve done all I can with the podcast. Sure, I can continue finding great guests to interview every week, but the reality is that most of the guests I’ve wanted to interview have already been on the show at least once, and those who haven’t, I’ve come to realize probably never will be. While the show has grown to a respectable size, it will likely never grow any bigger or reach the next level. And so, after 6 years without missing a single episode, the hard truth is that I’m bored. Sure, there are occasional interviews that blow my mind and make me want to keep going, but if I’m honest with myself, my sincere enthusiasm for recording the show week after week waned a long, long time ago. What’s more, I’ve found that my overall enthusiasm for the personal development space has really waned along with it. You see, though I’m still a lifelong devotee of all that personal development has to offer, after 7 years of working in the space day in and day out, I need to take a step back and cleanse my palate for a while. I’m sure I still have plenty to learn - and that I haven’t heard it all just yet… but sometimes, it certainly feels that way. Not to mention that the marketing, the content creation, the collaborations, the webinars, and broadcasts… it’s all a lot more work than it seems, and quite frankly, I think I probably just need a break. People talk a lot about a “7-year itch,” and there’s really something to that. This same thing happened to me in my last business, a luxury car parts internet retailer that I grew to seven figures - and then sold after 7 years. Whereas I used to be obsessed with cars and learning everything there was to learn about them, towards the end, I was so burnt out that I wanted nothing to do with them. Only now, 9 years later, have I rediscovered that passion and enthusiasm I once had as a kid. So now, you must be wondering: What’s Next? I mean, from the sound of it, you might be worried that I’m going to pack up and leave, shut down or sell my website, and disappear into the sunset - much like I did when I left the aftermarket automotive industry. Not to worry. I’m not going anywhere - at least not right now. After all, a huge part of why I do all this is a feeling of responsibility. So many of the techniques, ideas, and strategies that I talk about in my courses and on this podcast fundamentally changed my life - and for that reason, I feel like it’s my moral obligation to continue sharing them with the world - even if my day-to-day involvement has been reduced to a minimum. This is why I spent the better part of the last year training over a dozen SuperLearner Certified Coaches, who will continue working hard to ensure that the worldwide impact of the SuperLearner methodology continues to grow. It’s also why my team and I have been really active in sharing content on social media - so make sure to subscribe to us on Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook, if you haven’t already. So while my company will be running mostly independently of…
16 min
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