Talk Art
Talk Art
Jan 21, 2021
Ronan McKenzie and Joy Yamusangie (Recorded at HOME by RM)
Play • 1 hr 12 min

Russell & Robert meet artists Ronan McKenzie and Joy Yamusangie at new multifunctional creative space HOME, on Hornsey Road, North London. We explore their current joint-exhibition 'WATA, Further Explorations'. Taking root in Mckenzie and Yamusangie’s first formal collaboration, a short film of the same name (produced at the beginning of 2020), 'WATA' weaves together considerations of ancestry, cross cultural connections, music and migration. To watch 'WATA' online during lockdown, and to learn more about this extraordinary new centre for art, please visit: https://www.homebyrm.space/


Ronan Mckenzie is a London-based photographer, curator, and the publisher of HARD EARS. Her photography focuses on themes that unearth hidden beauty and cultural imagery. Visit Ronan at: https://www.ronanmckenzie.co.uk/


J Yamusangie is a mixed media artist working across illustration, printmaking, typography, poetry, ceramics, collage and painting, all with a central theme of autobiography. Visit Joy at: https://joyyamusangie.com/


Born out of the necessity to be seen and heard, HOME presents a considered curation of exhibitions from leading and exciting artists. Their lounge and co-workspace stimulate through a library of literature and arts, setting the scene for our events programme which aims always to connect and inspire. Being a modern hybrid of an art gallery and a community events space, at the heart of HOME is the aim to inspire, share and support. HOME takes ownership over cultivating our community and creating space for us to be, with a library and creative work space to be shared and enjoyed. HOME is one of very few black owned art spaces within London, and one of the only to be artist led, with a leading focus on supporting Black and Indigenous People of Colour. HOME responds directly to the personal and communal need for a more honest and representative space, that cares deeply for the artists we present and the community of people that we welcome in to our space. HOME offers a considered curatorial and events programme which highlights our founding concept; to truly contextualise artists, and continually transform to support the community we are built for.


Follow @RonanKSM and @JoyYamusangie on Instagram. Visit HOME by RM's official website and follow their Instagram @Home_by_RonanMcKenzie.


For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. For all requests, please email talkart@independenttalent.com

 

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The Great Women Artists
The Great Women Artists
Katy Hessel
Elizabeth Smith on Helen Frankenthaler
WELCOME BACK TO SEASON 5 of the GWA PODCAST! In episode 53 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the renowned curator and executive director of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Elizabeth Smith, on the trailblazing and legendary HELEN FRANKENTHALER (1928–2011) !!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] With a career spanning six decades, Helen Frankenthaler has long been recognized as one of the great American artists of the twentieth century. A member of the second generation of postwar American abstract painters, she is widely credited with playing a pivotal role in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Color Field painting. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, she expanded the possibilities of abstraction, while at times referencing figuration and landscape in highly personal ways. She produced a body of work whose impact on contemporary art has been profound and continues to grow. Born on December 12, 1928, and raised in New York. She attended the Dalton School, where she received her earliest art instruction from Rufino Tamayo. In 1949 she graduated from Bennington College, and by the early 1950s had entered into the Downtown New York Art Scene. Exhibiting at the infamous Ninth Street Show in 1951 (alongside Krasner, Mitchell, and others), Frankenthaler's breakthrough came in 1952 when she created Mountains and Sea, her first soak-stain painting. She poured thinned paint directly onto raw, unprimed canvas laid on the studio floor, working from all sides to create floating fields of translucent colour. The work catalysed the Colour Field School and was particularly influential for artists of her generation. In 1959, Frankenthaler had won first prize at the Premiere Biennale de Paris, by 1960 had her first major solo exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York, and by 1969 was one of four artists to represent America at the Venice Biennale. Oh! AND she had a Whitney Museum solo exhibition of the same year. She was invisible. I LOVED recording this episode with Elizabeth Smith about the fascinating life and work of Frankenthaler. ENJOY!!! Works discussed: Nature Abhors a Vacuum, 1973 Cloud Burst, 2002 Pink Lady, 1963 Mountains and Sea, 1952 Jacob's Ladder, 1957 Flood, 1967 FURTHER LINKS! https://www.frankenthalerfoundation.org/artworks/paintings https://www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/2021/may/helen-frankenthaler-radical-beauty/ https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/Helen-Frankenthaler https://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/studio/helen-frankenthaler https://gagosian.com/news/museum-exhibitions/pittura-panorama-paintings-by-helen-frankenthaler-museo-di-palazzo-grimani-venice/ Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
49 min
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Louise Fletcher/Alice Sheridan
Loose Representation & Disrupted Realism with Gabriel Lipper [109]
This week, we are joined by representational painter Gabriel Lipper who has been painting professionally for over 20 years and teaching for more than 15 years. In this conversation, we discuss Gabe's transition from classical figurative work to a much looser style that brings in elements of abstraction and he shares his reasoning for making this move. During our chat, we learn about Gabe's passion for daily drawing an, his desire to portray the beauty of our world, and his commitment to sharing more of himself in his work. (We also discover that Alice has an aversion to the word "sketch!") Gabe is about to teach his "Learning to See" course, which ran for the first time last year, and we discuss both the course content and his experience of teaching it. Finally, we share two inspirational artists for you to check out. Mentioned: Get access to the Learning to See free workshop classes HERE Perfect for exploring that hybrid between realism and abstraction Learning to See course is now open (end Feb 2021) Gabe would love you to watch the free classes first which you can do on the link above. Find out more about joining the full program  HERE Gabe's website Roger Cecil: A Secret Artist  Raimonds Staprans: Full Spectrum (out of print) Find our websites:  _www.alicesheridan.com__ _ www.louisefletcherart.com Follow us on Instagram: @alicesheridanstudio  @louisefletcher_art "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
52 min
The Log Books
The Log Books
Tash Walker, Adam Zmith and Shivani Dave
“Would like to stay” | Episode 11
We have so many fascinating stories for our final episode of the season: a lesbian who helped a gay immigrant to stay legally in the UK, a gay refugee who fled Syria, an Indian who learnt that cruising is different in India, Canada and the UK, and a British Indian who built mixed dance nights for London’s range of cultures. Tash and Adam hear about the people who phoned Switchboard for advice on how to live, love and work in the UK, and from a range of contributors with different perspectives on borders, cultures and LGBTQ+ identity. The Log Books — stories from Britain’s LGBT+ history and conversations about being queer today. Produced by Shivani Dave, Tash Walker and Adam Zmith, in partnership with Switchboard - the LGBT+ helpline. With thanks to the Bishopsgate Institute and the BFI National Archive. ‘Louise’ voiced by Cathy Tyson 'Sami' voiced by Aso Sherabayani Clip from Here and Now: Gay Black Group used with permission from MACE, the Media Archive for Central England at the University of Lincoln. First broadcast on June 26th, 1983. For more information about the themes in this episode, take a look at: Legal advice from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants Black Pride UK Naz and Matt Foundation Kaleidoscope Trust Peter Tatchell Foundation : Speaking out for Human Rights Lesbians & Gays Support the Migrants UK Lesbian & Gay Immigration Group Gaysians Music by Tom Foskett-Barnes Artwork by Natalie Doto https://www.thelogbooks.org Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thelogbooks.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
42 min
The Modern Art Notes Podcast
The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Tyler Green
Baseera Khan, Futurefarmers
Episode No. 486 features artists Baseera Khan and Amy Franceschini of Futurefarmers. Kahn and Futurefarmers are among the artists included in "Climate Changing: On Artists, Institutions, and the Social Environment" at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio through May 9. The exhibition looks at how artists engage with social issues and how they may shape institutions at a time when both racism and a global pandemic have caused many institutions to re-consider their construction and practices. The exhibition was curated by Lucy I. Zimmerman. "Climate Changing" features nine artworks commissioned by the Wexner, including work Torkwase Dyson discussed on the program last September. Baseera Khan addresses colonial histories, exile, place and displacement, and belonging within the context of capitalism and its impacts. Their work takes many forms, including performance, sculpture and, soon, a TV pilot produced during a recent residency at The Kitchen in New York City. Later this year they will have their first museum solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Futurefarmers is an ever-changing design studio and collective that supports art projects and research interests. Founded in 1995 by Amy Franceschini, the group has focused on using projects to propose alternatives to present social, political and environmental constructs. Futurefarmers' project "Seed Journey" is included in "Climate Changing." Initiated in 2016, "Seed Journey" is a collaboration between Futurefarmers and local farmers and scholars to return heirloom grain seeds to their native lands. It began with a voyage from Oslo, Norway to Belgium, and expanded in subsequent years to include other seeds, nations and continents.
1 hr 5 min
The Art Angle
The Art Angle
Artnet News
The Haunting History of the Benin Bronzes
For decades, one of the most urgent moral debates in the museum world has revolved around restitution, with art institutions around the world facing demands that masterworks in their collections be returned, either to countries like Greece and Italy who say that the treasures in question had been looted by tomb robbers, or to descendants of Jews who had been robbed by the Nazis. Today, the restitution question is as hotly debated as ever—what has changed, however, is that now the source countries that are demanding the returns are in Africa, and the looting at issue had been carried out by Britain and other European powers across the bloody years of colonialism, whose horrors remain obscured by the hagiographic official histories of the era. Now, a new book is cutting through the Gordian knot of restitution with an argument of bracing moral clarity, showing the West’s great quote-unquote “universal” museums to be complicit in a history of ongoing atrocities. It’s called “The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence, and Cultural Restitution,” and it’s by Dan Hicks, professor of contemporary archeology at Oxford. As its title suggests, the book focuses on a particular incident of looting—the seizure of thousands of artworks from the Kingdom of Benin in 1897—and it is a history that should really be known around the world. To delve into the ongoing saga of the Benin Bronzes, Dan Hicks is on the show today for a two-part episode: first, to discuss the tragic story of the looting of the Kingdom and, second, the fate these magnificent objects are facing today.
34 min
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