Meditation for Abundance to Manifest Your Desires / Morning Meditation
Play • 19 min
Episode 078 with Sara Raymond: Meditation for Abundance to Manifest Your Desires  The mindset of abundance is the opposite of scarcity—abundance is the overflowing and over-sufficient quantity of that which you desire, and you have the power to invite it into your life. You have the choice to change the way you look at things.…
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Your Anxiety Toolkit
Kimberley Quinlan, LMFT
Ep. 177: Does this Behavior Bring Me Closer to My Long Term Goals?
Welcome back to another episode of Your Anxiety Toolkit Podcast. Today I want to talk about a concept that is really important to long-term recovery or just life in general, which is this question: Does this bring me closer to my long term goals? Now, human beings are very reactionary. When there is an event, we quickly do a little data check in our brain. Is it safe? Can we proceed? Should we run away? Should we freeze? Should we just freak out? We have the whole process that happens in a millisecond, and then we respond. Now the fight-flight-freeze system of the brain keeps us alive. It’s a reaction we have to danger. So if there is a lion, we know to either freeze, run away or fight it. For those with an anxiety disorder, we often go into the fight-flight-freeze when there isn’t any real danger. The more we react, the more we enforce our fears and the more that we get stuck in a cycle of reaction. One of the most helpful things in life for me has been to step back and look at the cycle, look at the trends and ask myself, does this behavior, does this reaction bring me closer to my long term goals? If you can, just practice slowing down and pausing and saying to yourself “Wait a second. Is there a trend in my reaction?” I often say to my clients that my job is pretty simple. My job is to help you find the trends, find the patterns. If there is a pattern of reaction, that is where I intervene. I want you to be able to look at the patterns and the trends, and then decide for yourself what is good for you. We cannot live just in reaction because that is when we get stuck. So I want you to try asking yourself "Does this behavior bring me closer to my long term goals?" Remember to be gentle with yourselves and give yourselves a huge amount of self-compassion. If you get a moment, please go over to wherever you listen to podcasts, whether that be Apple Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, Podbean, and leave an honest review. Tell me how you feel about it, whether it's helping you, what you'd like to see. We are going to give away a pair of Beats headphones of your choice of color once we hit a thousand reviews! ERP School, BFRB School and Mindfulness School for OCD are open for purchase. Click here for more information. Coming in March ERP School will be available with bonus material! Additional exciting news! ERP School is now CEU approved which means that it is an accredited course for therapists and mental health professionals to take towards their continuing education credit hours. Please click here for more information. Transcript Ep. 177 Welcome to Your Anxiety Toolkit. I’m your host, Kimberley Quinlan. This podcast is fueled by three main goals. The first goal is to provide you with some extra tools to help you manage your anxiety. Second goal, to inspire you. Anxiety doesn’t get to decide how you live your life. And number three, and I leave the best for last, is to provide you with one big, fat virtual hug, because experiencing anxiety ain’t easy. If that sounds good to you, let’s go. Welcome back, friends. I am so happy to have you with me. How are you doing? How are you all? Sending you so much love. Checking in with you. Hey, how are you doing friend? Number one, thank you for being my friends. It really, really is wonderful. Up to this point, let me just reflect on something really quick. When I first started creating the podcast, I would look at the microphone and just talk into the abyss. Just talk, talk, talk, talk, talk, say what I want to say, and get done. The cool thing is I was just reflecting on this before. Now that I have met quite a few of you at either conferences or events or on social media or on the Facebook group, which is CBT School Campus, you can go to it’s a private group, and I know your faces, now I have this wonderful experience where I can look into the microphone and actually see your faces. It’s been so fun to actually meet you guys and just be like, “Oh great.” I know I have another face. Hello, welcome. Thank you for being here. I know your time is so precious and I’m so grateful that I get to spend this time of yours together. Let’s get straight to the episode. In the last few episodes, these are building on each other. We talked about self-compassion. Last week, I talked about the lies we tell ourselves which, PS, was a really hard conversation. Ain’t going to lie. I hope that was a safe, healthy conversation. If you didn’t hear it, go back because it was me sharing my own experience of telling lies to myself and to my family, and really just breaking down the judgment around that. So, go back and listen. And me sharing with my family and with you guys about how I’m going to change. Now today, I want to talk about a concept that is really, really important to long-term recovery in or just life in general, which is this question: Does this bring me closer to my long-term goals? Now, human beings are very reactionary. This is why we have survived for millions of years. When there is an event, we quickly do a little data check in our brain. Is it safe? Can we proceed? Should we run away? Should we freeze? Should we just freak out? We have the whole process that happens in a millisecond, and then we respond. Now the fight-flight-freeze system of the brain, we call it the FFF response, is a part that keeps us alive. It’s a reaction we have to danger. So if there is a lion, we know to either freeze, run away or fight it. We instinctively know this. But what happens is, if we have an anxiety disorder or little glitchy in the brain, often what we do is we go into the fight-flight-freeze when there isn’t danger and we’re in reaction. And the more we’re in reaction, the more we enforce that fear and the more that we get stuck in a cycle of reaction, reaction, reaction, reaction, reaction. Now, one of the most helpful things in life for me has been to step back and look at the cycle, look at the trends and ask myself, does this behavior, does this reaction bring me closer to my long-term goals? There’s this moment where if we can, we can just practice slowing down and pausing. This will be really important for you, folks, who do compulsions on autopilot. Slow down and pause and zoom out and go, “Wait a second. Is there a trend in my reaction?” I often say to my clients and patients, “My job is pretty simple. My job is for you to tell me how you’re doing, for you to explain to me what’s going. My job is to find the trends, find the patterns. If there is a pattern of reaction, that’s where I intervene. If the reactor action is problematic, that’s where we intervene. If the reaction is really helpful and productive and brings you long-term joy and quality of life, I have no business messing up with that. I’m here to look at disorder.” That’s what disorder means, is to look at where there is a problem in the order of your life, to look at the trends. The question here I want you to do is, take a step back, look at the trends in your life and see what is and isn’t working, and ask yourself: Does this behavior bring me closer to my long-term goals or to my values? Last week, I shared about the lie that I told myself and my family about, “Oh, I have to work. I don’t have a choice. I have to work this hard.” And then I was like, “Wait a second. That’s a lie. I don’t have to work this hard. I make myself work this hard. I pushed myself to work this hard. I allow myself to work this hard.” I have to look and stop and go, “Okay, it’s cool. It’s fun. I get a lot done. I get a lot of fulfillment from it.” But if I step back and go, “Wait a second, does this bring me closer to my long-term goals?” some of it does. Yes, it helps me feel more fulfilled in my work. It gives me more success in my work. It makes me write a good book. But it doesn’t fulfill the long-term goal of me wanting to be a present parent, a good wife, have a c…
13 min
The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland
The HSP Podcast with Julie Bjelland
Julie Bjelland
Honoring Black HSP Leaders of this Generation and Generations to Come with Michael Coles
How we overcome the inner battles we face and what fuels our strength to show up in our own unique way. We can remember and honor the Black leaders before us and we can also honor the new and upcoming leaders during Black History Month.  Black HSP's can struggle more than others with the inner dialogue of who we should be in the world and deeply feel the turmoil and injustice in the world.  Both of our generation and generations before us.   We all want to find our own path and can be faced with family or authorities telling us who we should be, cannot be or will never be.   I want to have a conversation with other Black HSP's who struggle with choosing to become the leader they are meant to be or settling into the identity that others put upon you.  We are all whole and complete as we are and have the power to heal old wounds and beliefs to become the leader we were meant to be within and without. Holistic Health Practitioner and Health Strategy Coach LMT, CES, FMS Bio: Michael is on a mission to teach the world that we are all capable of intrinsic healing and transformation both mentally and physically. If we start with foundational health, we can build upon this foundation to create the empowered life we want to live. Michael overcame, healed, and transformed from having Tourette syndrome, severe asthma, ADHD, obesity, and an eating addiction and now helps others embody health to become empowered to live a life of joy, peace and success. He is a US Marine, a Holistic Health Practitioner, and Health Strategy Coach. https://michaelacoles.com/ Michael also did a previous event with us Tapping into your Guidance System to Take Aligned Action --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/julie-bjelland/message
57 min
CHITHEADS from Embodied Philosophy
CHITHEADS from Embodied Philosophy
Embodied Philosophy
Zhenevere Sophia Dao on Sexuality and the Transgender Necessity (#128)
In this episode we discuss: Post-Daoism as a philosophy reinterpreting depth psychology, qigong, and Daoism MogaDao as a practice at the intersection of somatic, queer, and socioerotic inquiry Socially imposed self-images versus deeply personal mythopoetic self-images The democratization of desire in all forms and socio-erotic experiences Spiritual significance of sex, sexuality, and desire as authentic expressions of a soul’s original virtue Consumeristic paradigm of sexuality as another attribute of power  The importance of trans people in society as leaders in and examples of radical authenticity Zhenevere Sophia Dao is a poet, novelist, playwright, and the director of the SACRa Theater Company. She has been a Stegner Fellow at Stanford University and has published fiction with Penguin Books. An independent scholar, she is the founder of the philosophy of Post-Daoism and the practice tradition of MogaDao, which incorporates original “mythosomatic” qigong forms and meditations, and spiritualized asana, in combination with academic studies in mythopoetics, comparative philosophy and religion, Depth Sexology, socioerotic and sociopolitical inquiry, and queer studies. A transgender woman, she is also the founder of The Transgender Necessity, a platform for public discourse which underscores the cultural necessity of transgender individuals.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1 hr 20 min
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Healthline Media
What Are Boundaries and Why Do They Matter?
Most people think they have good boundaries. But when pressed, they can’t often explain what their boundaries are — let alone maintain positive ones. Today’s guest, Nancy Kalina Gomez, explains that boundaries aren’t about being defensive or hostile. Healthy boundaries strengthen our ability to honor our needs and wants, showing the world how we expect to be treated. Gomez also discusses how to communicate those boundaries without offending our loved ones. Listen Now! Guest Information for 'What Are Boundaries' Podcast Episode Nancy Kalina Gomez is a bilingual professional with 25+ years of experience as a clinician. She earned a master's degree in clinical and counseling psychology from Teacher's College, Columbia University. Prior to that, she specialized in clinical psychology with adults/adolescents at The George Washington University where she completed the required academic coursework toward a PsyD. During her career, Nancy has worked in both programming and direct clinical services. She has treated clients from all over the world for issues surrounding abandonment, anxiety or panic, bipolar disorder, depression (clinical and situational), dual diagnosis, family conflicts, life transitions, personality disorders, and more. Nancy has created several webinars on various topics for Psych Central and World of Psychology. She currently helps clients through her website, CouchIssues. About the Inside Mental Health Podcast Host Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
21 min
Anxiety Slayer™ with Shann and Ananga
Anxiety Slayer™ with Shann and Ananga
Shann Vander Leek & Ananga Sivyer
Anxiety does not discriminate with Glen Tanner
#529: Today Shann is speaking with Clinical Psychologist, Glen Tanner from Sydney Australia. Glen is the host of the Mindcog podcast where he interviews experts in the fields of psychology, neuroscience, wellbeing, and high performance to break down the science behind your mind, brain, and behavior. Glen is passionate about psychology, and it's his mission to help people reconnect with their values, achieve their goals, unlock their potential, and live more rich, meaningful and fulfilling lives. Glen has first-hand experience with Mental Health - having lived with anxiety most of his life. Unfortunately, anxiety does not discriminate. It cuts a swathe through every level and facet of our society: men, women, children, old, young, rich, poor, black, white, and all levels of physical and educational ability - Not even psychologists are immune. Show Notes: “The shoe that fits one person pinches the other, there is no recipe for living that suits all cases.” - Carl Jung Glen suffered from anxiety is entire life. Glen shares the story of his transition from a winemaker to a psychologist Why there is no quick- fix for an anxiety problem. It takes time and a combination of methods and lifestyle changes. -How Glen cared for himself after losing both his mother and father to lung cancer while he was completing his Psychology degree. Glen believes that therapists are not and do not need to be immune to mental illness. Listen to the Mindcog Podcast at www.themindcogpodcast.com/
30 min
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
Tammy Sollenberger
IFS and Inviting Curiosity with Racist Parts with Daphne Fatter
On today's episode, I chat with Dr. Daphne Fatter, certified IFS therapist and a licensed psychologist in private practice in Dallas, Texas. She teaches workshops on white racial socialization for therapists, in addition to teaching on trauma treatment for TZK seminars. She is a trained facilitator by Challenging Racism to lead conversations on race and racism. This is the last episode in the Heirloom Summit Series, and I'm excited to this with Daphne who walks through the Six Stage White Racial Developmental Model by Janet Helms. We also discuss teaching kids about whiteness, privilege and racism. The book that she mentions is "Raising White Kids: Bringing up children in a racially unjust America" by Jennifer Harvey. Daphne has a ton of resources on raising kids to be anti-racist on her website. We talk about trailheads to our protective parts around racism and the parts who try to separate, numb, and disconnect from racism and parts who engage in 'white saviorism.' A list of trailheads is on her website too. -------- Find out more about Daphne here: https://www.daphnefatterphd.com/ Her email is: info@daphnefatterphd.com Find out about the workshop she co-leads here: https://www.daphnefatterphd.com/treating-racial-trauma-series.html More Information about the White Racial Developmental Model by Jennifer Helms here: https://libguides.du.edu/c.php?g=1046908&p=7596766 https://coatescbc.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/helms-white-racial-identity-development-model.pdf She suggests this podcast on Whiteness that is 'too good not to share': https://www.sceneonradio.org/seeing-white/ For more about 'Calling in' check out: https://www.learningforjustice.org/magazine/spring-2019/speaking-up-without-tearing-down --------- I'd love to connect with you @ifs.tammy on Instagram and Twitter and on Facebook at The One Inside Facebook page. To register for the Heirloom Summit and receive a discount as a listener of TOI go to http://bit.ly/theoneinside Enjoy!
53 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
230: Secrets of Self-Esteem—What is it? How do I get it? How can I get rid of it once I’ve got it? And more, on Ask David!
* Ask David: Questions on self-esteem, recovery from PTSD, dating people with Borderline Personality Disorder, recovery on your own, and more! Jay asks: * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” * Many patients can read your books and do the exercises and recover on their own. Is a teacher or coach sometimes needed to speed things up? * Is it possible for a person to become happy WITHOUT needing anyone else if they have had depression in past and/or PTSD? * Also, how would Team-CBT address treating PTSD? PTSD can involve a person having multiple traumas. * * * * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? Thanks, Jay, I will make this an Ask david, if that is okay, but here is my quick response. Although many folks now show dramatic changes in a single, two-hour therapy session, they will still have to do homework to cement those gains, including: * Listening to or watching the recording of the session * Finish on paper any Daily Mood Log that was done primarily in role-playing during the session. In other words, write the Positive thoughts, rate the belief, and re-rate the belief in the corresponding negative thought. * Use the Daily Mood Log in the future whenever you get upset and start to have negative thoughts again. * I also do Relapse Prevention Training following the initial dramatic recovery, and this takes about 30 minutes. I advise the patient that relapse, which I define as one minute or more of feeling crappy, is 100% certain, and that no human being can be happy all the time. We all hit bumps in the road from time to time. When they do relapse, their original negative thoughts will return, and they will need to use the same technique again that worked for them the first time they recovered. In addition, they will have certain predictable thoughts when they relapse, like “this proves that the therapy didn’t rally work,” or “this shows that I really am a hopeless case,” or worthless, etc. I have them record a role-play challenging these thoughts with the Externalization of Voices, and do not discharge them until they can knock all these thoughts out of the park. I tell them to save the recording, and play it if they need it when they relapse. I also tell them that if they can’t handle the relapse, I’ll be glad to give them a tune up any time they need it. I rarely hear from them again, which is sad, actually, since I have developed a fondness for nearly all the patients I’ve ever treated. But I’d rather lose them quickly to recovery, than work with them endlessly because they’re not making progress! People with Relationship Problems recover more slowly than individuals with depression or anxiety for at least three reasons, and can rarely or never be treated effectively in a single two-hour session: * The outcome and process resistance to change in people with troubled relationships is typically way more intense. * It takes tremendous commitment and practice to get good at the five secrets of effective communication, in the same way that learning to play piano beautifully takes much commitment and practice. * Resolving relationship conflicts usually requires the death of the “self” or “ego,” and that can be painful. That’s why the Disarming Technique can be so hard for most people to learn, and many don’t even want to learn it, thinking that self-defense and arguing and fighting back is the best road to travel! * * * * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? Yes, Ten Days to Self-Esteem would likely be a deeper dive into the topic of Self-Esteem. It is a ten-step program that can be used in groups or individually in therapy, or as a self-help tool. There is a Leader’s Manual, too, for those who want to develop groups based on it. * * * * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” I was involved with a woman with Borderline Personality Disorder, and it was exhausting! Why was I attracted to her? Thank you for the question, Jay. Most claims about parents and childhood experiences, in my opinion, are just something somebody claimed and highly unlikely to be true if one had a really great data base to test the theory. We don’t really know why people are attracted to each other. Many men do seem attracted to women with Borderline Personality Disorder. Perhaps it’s exciting and dramatic dynamic that they’re attracted to, and perhaps it’s appealing to try to “help” someone who seems wounded. Good research on topics like this would be enormously challenging, and people would just ignore the results if not in line with their own thinking. Our field is not yet very scientific, but is dominated by “cults” and people who believe, and who desperately want to believe, things that are highly unlikely, in my opinion, to be true. I do quite a lot of data analysis using a sophisticated statistical modeling program called AMOS (the Analysis of Moment Structures) created by Dr. James Arbuckle from Temple University in Philadelphia, someone I admire tremendously. This program does something called structural equation modeling. In the typical analysis, the program tells you that your theory cannot possibly be true, based on your data. If you are brave, this can lead to radical changes in how you think and see things, especially if you are not “stuck” in your favored theories. But this type of analysis is not for the faint of heart. All the best, David Here is Jay’s follow-up email: HI Dr. Burns, As you know A LOT of people attribute their present problems (depression / anxiety / relationship conflicts / addictions) to their "abusive" or "toxic" relationship with their parents. It is interesting that it seems some people internalize negative beliefs about themselves based on what their parents said to them on a consistent basis. But it seems you are saying the data does not support that theory. Jay Thanks, Jay, I’m glad you responded again. There may be some truth to those kinds of theories. We know, for example, that abused or feral cats often have trouble with trust. So, we don’t want to trivialize the pain and the horrors that many humans and animals alike endure. At the same time, people are eager to jump onto theories that “sound right” to them and serve their purposes, and most of these theories are not based on sound research. Here are two examples from my own research. I tested, in part, the theory that depression comes from bad relationships, and also that addictions result from emotional problems. I examined the causal relationships between depression on the one hand and troubled vs happy relationships with loved ones on the other hand in several hundred patients during the first 12 weeks of treatment at my clinical in Philadelphia, and published it in top psychology journal for clinical research. (will include link) That was because there were at the time two warring camps—those who said that a lack of loving and satisfying relationships causes depression, and those who said it was the other way around, that depression leads to troubled relationships. And the third group said it worked both ways. My study indicated that although troubled relationships were correlated with depression, there were NO causal links in either direction. Instead, the statistical models strongly hinted that an unobs…
47 min
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