SPS-249: An Expert in Her Field: Marketing to a Niche - with Carly Kade
52 min

Find out how indie author Carly Kade used the power of the self-publishing community to market her books to a niche audience.

Fiction Writing Made Easy
Fiction Writing Made Easy
Savannah Gilbo
The 6 Scenes Every Thriller Novel Needs
*In today's episode, we're going to talk about the key scenes that every thriller novel needs to have in order to work and to satisfy fans of the genre.* Here's a preview of what's included: [01:18] Thrillers combine all the criminality and suspense of a good detective novel with the danger and life and death stakes from the action or horror genre. Usually, these stories center around a protagonist who's focused on stopping a future crime from happening. [01:40] Readers choose thriller novels because they want to experience the thrill of trying to outsmart and stop the villain before he or she commits more crimes -- all from the comfort of their own homes. And like all genre fiction, you have to deliver the emotional experience readers are looking for in order for your story to work. [02:15] Obligatory scenes are the key events, decisions, and discoveries that move a protagonist along their journey from point A to point B. They help us writers craft a story that works AND a story that will deliver a specific emotional experience. [03:55] Key scene #1: A scene where a crime is discovered. [04:45] Key scene #2: A scene where the stakes become personal for the protagonist and they commit to stopping the antagonist. [05:55] Key scene #3: A scene where the protagonist learns what the antagonist wants and why. This scene helps to shift the protagonist from being reactive to proactive and helps them recommit to stopping the antagonist. [06:55] Key scene #4: A scene where the protagonist learns or does something that sets them up to be the antagonist’s final victim. [7:55] Key scene #5: A scene where the protagonist is at the mercy of the antagonist. [8:45] Key scene #6: A scene where readers learn whether justice prevailed or not. [9:45] Key points and episode recap. *Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts* Are you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not subscribed there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show in Apple Podcasts! If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance! *Links mentioned in this episode:* * Episode Freebie: Thriller Genre Key Scenes PDF Cheat Sheet * Thriller Obligatory Scenes: The 6 Scenes Every Thriller Novel Needs (article) * Thriller Genre Conventions: The 10 Things Every Thriller Novel Needs (article) P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
12 min
writing class radio
writing class radio
andrea askowitz and allison langer
How Does a Man Get Away with Calling Women Bitches and Hoes in a Story?
Today’s episode is the last in a series called Home. Writing Class Radio helped produce a documentary with Chapman Partnership, a homeless center in South Florida, exploring the meaning of home. Our documentary will air on PBS, date (tba). On this episode, you will hear a story by Marvin Jenkins, a past student, poet, Boeing employee, and dad. Marvin lost his home after he wrote an explicit text message to his girlfriend’s best friend and she kicked him out. Marvin has always been in love with Serena, but drugs got the best of him.  Marvin’s essay is a great example of how taking responsibility for your actions in a story creates a reliable narrator. The voice in this essay also exemplifies how you can say ugly things, if you own that they are ugly.  Writing Class Radio is co-hosted by Allison Langer (www.allisonlanger.com) and Andrea Askowitz (www.andreaaskowitz.com). This episode of Writing Class Radio is produced by Matt Cundill of Sound Off Media Company, Andrea Askowitz and Allison Langer. Mia Pennekamp is our media specialist. Theme music by Ari Herstand. Additional music by Podington Bear. There’s more writing class on our website (www.writingclassradio.com), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/writingclassradio/), Instagram and Twitter (@wrtgclassradio). If you love the lessons you get on each episode, you can get them ALL in one place--our three-part video series--for $50. Click Video Classes on our website. Writing Class Radio is open to submissions from our listeners. Go to the submissions page on our website for guidelines. We pay! If you want to be a part of the movement that helps people better understand each other through storytelling, follow us on Patreon. For $10/month Andrea will answer all your publishing questions. For $25/month you can join Allison’s First Draft weekly writers group, where you can write and share your work. Go to www.Patreon.com/writingclassradio or click here to support us. Thank you for listening! Everyone has a story. What's yours?
18 min
Google Teacher Podcast
Google Teacher Podcast
Matt Miller and Kasey Bell - Education Podcast Network
Google Arts and Culture - GTP124
Google News and Updates * Virtually raise your hand to ask a question in Google Meet * Accept knocks in bulk in Google Meet * Expanding Google Arts & Culture with Expeditions * Expeditions app and Tour Creator going away Featured Content Google Arts & Culture is a non-profit initiative. They work with cultural institutions and artists around the world. The Google Arts & Culture mission is to preserve and bring the world’s art and culture online so it’s accessible to anyone, anywhere. * Museums * Art * Historical events and figures * Virtual tours (Expeditions now part of A&C) * 360 * Collections * Time Explorer * Color Explorer * Experiments (games) * Lesson from Applied Digital Skills * Art selfie * Nearby * Harry Potter: A History of Magic Google Teacher Podcast Mailbag Marcel, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada -- I have been a longtime listener and I am wondering if there is a site that you know of, that we can share G-Suite materials. I have put in a lot of time to make some good stuff, and I am sure other teachers have as well. You may have mentioned a site on one of your previous podcasts, but for the life of me, I can find it. (I have re-listened to so many podcasts...some are almost better the second time) On The Blogs * Matt * New book, Do More with Google Classroom, coming in mid-December * * Check out the book companion website for resources * Ditch Summit: Free online conference for teachers, December 14 to January 8 * Kasey * Blended Learning with Google (Part 1: Do THIS, Not THAT) * Blended Learning with Google (Part 2: Storytelling in Any Classroom) New Books Coming Soon! BlendedLearningwithGoogle.com
34 min
Polyamory Weekly
Polyamory Weekly
Minx
587 Love in the time of coronavirus
How do we practice poly responsibly during a pandemic? Is it OK to move my metamour in with me rather than not see her for the duration of enforced social isolation? 0:00 Introduction and host chat * If you’re under 18, visit scarleteen.com * Found a new poly podcast, Pod Pod Cvlt Cast, with 34 long episodes! * We’ve got a new puppy to keep us company during #stayathome! 3:00 Poly in the news * Elisabeth Sheff’s four-part series on monogamy in Psychology Today: CNM is not a good choice as a method to fix a relationship that is broken, Four tips for heteroflexible couples who are considering opening their relationships, Three reasons why consensual non-monogamy will not work for people who are monogamous, and her latest, Monogamy by Orientation. * Alan’s Friday Poly in the news roundup, covering primarily the coronavirus pandemic. * How coronavirus is impacting polyamorous relationships * How a polyamory expert is dating during the coronavirus pandemic * What it’s like to isolate with your girlfriend and her other boyfriend * Is it irresponsible to date around during a pandemic * Minx’s advice * Use Zoom or Amazon Chime to host a virtual dance party or cocktail hour to stay connected * Use your webcam to see facial expressions * Try watching movies “together” over Zoom. Or send dinner to them and Zoom each other to chat during! 10:45 Contact us Questions? Comments? Feedback? Email polyweekly@gmail.com and attach an audio comment or call the listener comment line at 802-505-POLY. If you want us to teach a class at your event, want us to coach you, or want to appear on the podcast, email lustyguy@polyweekly.com. 11:25 Topic: should we move my metamour in with us while we socially isolate? If you’re considering cohabitation that you wouldn’t have considered due to coronavirus social isolation requirements, some advice: * As always, make sure your existing relationships are relatively healthy first. * Ask everyone involved what they need to be happy and healthy in a communal space. Consider personal space, alone time, sexual, and physical needs. * Discuss how finances will work in terms of rent, groceries, and other bills. * Discuss expectations for chores and other responsibilities. * Ask your kids how they feel about your metamour moving in. * Have the pets been introduced? Is there a danger that they might attack each other? * Set up regular check-ins after the move-in. These provide opportunities to bring up what it working well, what isn’t, to express gratitude and appreciations, and to bring up issues before they become bigger. * Take a break from news coverage if it increases anxiety or feelings of depression. 17:00 Join the conversation To join the online conversation around this and other episodes, follow us on Twitter or Facebook. We love when you review us on Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcatcher (including Spotify!) and when you share us with your friends directly. 17: 05 Feedback * S from the Boston area calls in to share a personal neologism, “schmeeling.” * Phenom calls in to ask how to get her partner to date more and make sure everything is OK. She keeps encouraging him to date, but he’s not getting out as much as her. * There is no issue here except that maybe you feel guilty. Deal with your own guilt and stop pressuring him to date! 24:45 Pervy bird throuple Oops! Accidentally skipped this one: Perverted Illinois bald eagle threesome threatens sanctity of marriage. What’s next, hawk orgies? 26:00 Happy poly moment Finding unexpected commonalities with your metamour! 28:45 Thank you to our subscribers and contributors Thanks to all our PW Playmates! Also to Pacemaker Jane for letting us use their song Good Suspicions as our intro and outro music and to you for listening and sharing.
30 min
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
Kelton Reid
How Award-Winning Debut Novelist Bryan Washington Writes
#PodcastersForJustice New York Times Notable author, Bryan Washington, dropped by to chat about how his short stories garnered so much acclaim, what cuisine tells us about the larger narrative around sharing a meal, and why writers need to ignore the publishing marketplace. "A reading itself can feel more akin to a setlist. You adjust your setlist based on the context in which you're performing. I think of the reading ... as being interconnected with the text, but its own singular entity." — Bryan Washington The author published the award-winning story collection Lot in 2019 which garnered him – to name only a few – a National Book Award 5 Under 35 honor, the Dylan Thomas Prize, a Lambda Literary Award, numerous best-of-the-year lists, and one of President Barack Obama’s favorite books of 2019. His debut novel is Memorial, and it too earned a NY Times notable spot, a Good Morning America Book Club Pick, and was named a Best Book of the Year by The Washington Post, TIME, O, the Oprah Magazine, Esquire, Harper's Bazaar, and others. It's described as "A funny and profound story about family in all its strange forms, joyful and hard-won vulnerability, becoming who you're supposed to be, and the limits of love." The author described Memorial as a "gay slacker dramedy." NPR called it, “A masterpiece,” and The Washington Post said of the book “No other novel this year captures so gracefully the full palette of America.” A24 has already purchased the rights to Memorial, with Washington writing the adaptation for television. Bryan has written for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Buzzfeed, Vulture, The Paris Review, McSweeney’s Quarterly, Tin House, One Story, Bon Appetit, GQ, The Awl, and Catapult. Please help us learn more about you by completing this short 7-question survey If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews. In this file Bryan Washington and I discussed: * Trying to pin down the intangible definition of "home" * How irons out the creases in his prose * Why writers are like stand-up comedians * His involvement with the adaptation of his novel for the small screen * And why you need to just sit down and start writing Show Notes: * BryWashing.com * Memorial: A Novel by Bryan Washington [Amazon] * Bryan Washington on Twitter * Kelton Reid on Twitter #PodcastersForJustice
30 min
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