Exponential Wisdom
Exponential Wisdom
Nov 29, 2020
Episode 94: When the Hospital Comes To You
Play • 22 min

Peter and Dan discuss transformations in healthcare as a result of the pandemic and consequent stay-at-home orders. Peter envisions a future wherein people don’t go to the hospital when they get sick, but instead have a hospital at their fingertips thanks to sensors, wearables, and an abundance of personalized medical data.

In this episode:

  • Peter gives an update on COVAXX and a number of other vaccines developed for COVID-19. 
  • Dan delves into tele-health transformations within our modern-day healthcare system. 
  • Peter and Dan discuss why they believe the pandemic will speed up healthcare transformations, including: AI collaboration with physicians; drugs customized and designed for the individual; and rapid improvements in wearable hardware and commercial viability.
Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Podcast Notes
109: Nobel Prize Winner Frank Wilczek: Fundamentals — What Are The 10 Keys To Reality?
Into the Impossible With Brian Keating Podcast Notes Key Takeaways * The hypothesis of designing an AI able to “think” seems inevitable to occur at some point * Humans are proof that the complexity of the mind is an emergent property of matter * The real question is not whether computers can beat humans at chess * Will they ever be able to create the game of chess? * Dr. Wilczek thinks that it will be possible to design “creative” computers and there already hints of that * Dr. Wilczek describes his personal operating system as “Think, Play, Repeat” * What allowed Dr. Wilczek to Be So Prolific * He loves learning new things, so what he does, doesn’t feel like “work” * He allows himself to follow his curiosity and learn about other fields as an amateur * When he finds intersections between his work and his other interests he is able to dive deeper and draw connections * No amount of thinking about what is can lead to a logical inference about what ought to be, or how we ought to behave” Dr. Wilczek * Science can’t help us decide what’s good and what’s bad * For a long time, people have thought about these issues and their wisdom is often contained in religions Read the full notes @ podcastnotes.org Frank Wilczek is a theoretical physicist, author, and intellectual adventurer. He has received many prizes for his work, including a Nobel Prize in Physics. Win a FREE copy of his newest book Fundamentals: enter this giveaway – https://kingsumo.com/g/n7xeaa/win-a-copy-of-frank-wilczeks-fundamentals-10-keys-to-reality Wilczek has made seminal contributions to fundamental particle physics, cosmology, and the physics of materials. His current […]
1 hr 14 min
Supply Chain Now
Supply Chain Now
Supply Chain Now
Nobody Does Supply Chain Alone: Hannah Kain, President & CEO of ALOM
In this episode of Supply Chain Now, as part of the Full Access series powered by Capgemini, Scott, Greg, and special co-host Cyndi Lago welcome Hannah Kain to the podcast. Hannah Kain is President and CEO of ALOM, a global supply chain company she founded in 1997 headquartered in Fremont, California. ALOM operates out of 19 global locations to support its Fortune 500 customers in the technology, automotive, medical, financial, and energy sectors with brand enhancing supply chain management services and solutions. Hannah was born in Denmark where - in addition to a business and political career - she taught at Copenhagen Business School. Hannah holds three university degrees. Hannah is a current board member of the National Association of Manufacturers, Women’s Business Enterprise National Council (WBENC), and WBEC-Pacific. She is the board chair of How Women Lead, Silicon Valley, serves on the Advisory Council of Heritage Bank of Commerce and is a member of the exclusive invitation-only Committee of 200 for executive women. She has received numerous awards for her supply chain, leadership and diversity activities. Among her 2020 recognition: Business Insider named her one of the top 100 people transforming business. For the sixth year in a row, Hannah was named a Supply Chain Pro to Know. She was recognized as one of the top 10 women in logistics, and she won the inaugural SDCE Women in Supply Chain award in September 2020. Among her prior awards, 2019 WBEC-Pacific Pinnacle Award, 2017 Gold Woman of The Year Stevie, and the 2017 Silver Stevie for best global woman-owned business. She has been honored as a Top 25 Champion of Diversity in STEM, won the Manufacturing Institute STEP Ahead Award, the YWCA Tribute to Women Award, inducted into the Silicon Valley Capitol Club wall of fame, won the global Vistage Leadership Award, and named a WBENC Business Star. Upcoming Events & Resources Mentioned in this Episode: Subscribe to Supply Chain Now and ALL Supply Chain Now Programming Here: https://supplychainnowradio.com/subscribe Leave a review for Supply Chain Now: https://ratethispodcast.com/supplychainnow Connect with Scott on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/scottwindonluton/ Connect with Greg on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/gswhite/ Connect with Cyndi on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/cyndi-lago Connect with Hannah on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hannahkain/ Supply Chain Now Ranked #3 Supply Chain YouTube Channel: https://tinyurl.com/yazfegov Download the Q3 2020 U.S. Bank Freight Payment Index: freight.usbank.com/?es=a229&a=20 Watch the Replay of The Connected IoT Supply Chain: https://supplychainnow.com/the-connected-iot-supply-chain Check Out News From Our Sponsors: U.S. Bank: www.usbpayment.com/transportation-solutions Capgemini: www.capgemini.com/us-en/ Vector Global Logistics: vectorgl.com/ Verusen: www.verusen.com/ This episode was hosted by Greg White, Scott Luton, and Cyndi Lago. For additional information, please visit ur dedicated show page at: https://supplychainnow.com/episode-551.
59 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Why Can't You Buy Anything Anymore? Well It's not all the Virus' Fault.
So the holidays are behind us and if you were left disappointed by what you found under your Christmas tree it might be because you weren’t in the spirit of things, or it might have been because Santa couldn’t get any stock of anything. The good little consumers of the world might have started to notice an increasingly common trend where more and more products sell out the day they are released, or are never available at all to ordinary consumers. Everything from playstations, switches, Xboxes and graphics cards, to lego sets, handbags, watches, and even toilet paper, it seems more and more like we are living in a world that is out of stock. But why? Stock shortages from time to time happen, that’s just general supply chain management but why has this become such a consistent issue. All of these products are made by businesses with a profit motive, and those profits don’t get made unless products get sold, so what gives? Now I know what you might be thinking, “err it’s the virus of course” and certainly this has thrown a spanner into the works of global supply chains but it’s not the whole story. Limited supply is one thing, but if traditional economics is to be believed, businesses don’t let themselves run out of stock, instead they just raise prices to match demand and maximize their profits. What’s more, is that the coronavirus is not exactly new news to companies. If they were caught out in early 2020 then fair enough, but almost a year later you would think the corporate executives responsible for multi-billion dollar product launches could account for this new global paradigm, right? But they haven’t, and you might ask why? Well to understand this we as always need to look at a few key things. How have global supply chains been affected, beyond just blaming everything on COVID? Are the companies involved actually making poor business decisions? And why aren’t these products just doing what supply and demand would tell them to do and increase in price?
17 min
Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of World-Class Performers
Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of World-Class Performers
Tim Ferriss
BJ Miller
This episode features the profile of BJ Miller from Tools of Titans, which is now available as an audiobook. This chapter's narrators are Kaleo Griffith (bio) and Ray Porter (profile). To check out the full audiobook of Tools of Titans with 100+ chapters, visit audible.com/ferriss. BJ Miller (@bjmillermd) is a hospice and palliative care physician who has worked in many settings, inpatient, outpatient, and home, and now sees patients and families at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. BJ also acted as executive director for the Zen Hospice Project for five years, learning about the administration of health care and how difficult it can be for patients and families to find the care they need. He speaks all over the country and beyond on the theme of living well in the face of death. He has been featured in The New York Times and interviewed by Oprah Winfrey, Tim Ferriss, and Krista Tippett. BJ lives in Mill Valley with his chosen fur family, Maysie, the Muffin Man, and Darkness, and loves exploring nature — including human — especially from any two-wheeled vehicle (or four). *** The audiobooks of Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors can be found at audible.com/ferriss If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts? Sign up for Tim’s email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/email. Follow Tim: Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferriss Facebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferriss
16 min
Made You Think
Made You Think
Nat Eliason and Neil Soni
66: Making the Navalmanack: Interview with Eric Jorgenson
“Even today, what to study and how to study it are more important than where to study it and for how long. The best teachers are on the Internet. The best books are on the Internet. The best peers are on the Internet. The tools for learning are abundant. It’s the desire to learn that’s scarce.” - Naval Ravikant In this episode of Made You Think, Nat and Neil are joined by Eric Jorgenson. Eric is a writer, product strategist, and author of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant. We cover a wide range of topics including: * How Eric came to the idea of writing The Almanack * What Eric's biggest lessons and takeaways were from authoring this book * What topics didn't end up making the final cut * The future of education and online courses * The idea of leverage and how it can be used And much more. If you haven't already, make sure to check out our last episode where we talked in great depth about The Almanack and discussed our key takeaways from the book. Let us know what you think of this episode by sending a tweet to Nat, Neil, and Eric! Links from the Episode Mentioned in the show * Previous MYT Episode (0:35) * Naval on Shane Parrish's podcast (2:27) * Readwise (10:30) * Bonus Section: Education (27:07) * Building a Second Brain (32:22) * Lambda School (32:55) * How To Think Like Elon Musk - Made You Think Episode (44:37) * SpaceX (45:40) Books Mentioned * The Almanack of Naval Ravikant * Debt: The First 5000 Years (11:23) * Infinite Jest (13:58) (Nat's Book Notes) (Book Episode pt. 1) (Book Episode pt. 2) * Vagabonding (52:02) (Nat's Book Notes) People Mentioned * Naval Ravikant * Trevor McKendrick (7:38) * Elon Musk (41:41) * Tim Ferriss (50:40) Show Notes: 0:52 - Eric Jorgenson, author of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant, shares how his idea of writing the book came to be. 5:35 - From the start, Eric knew he didn’t want it to just be a summary book. How he was able to hone in on the writing style of the book to capture the interest of his readers all the way through. 9:20 - Highlight density. Using highlight data to estimate book quality. Skipping chapters and not finishing books. 14:14 - Eric’s key takeaways from the book and what knowledge he has carried away from writing it. The importance of equity, accountability and leverage. We have the tendency to want to do everything ourselves rather than to create systems and put the pieces together. 19:04 - How Twitter and other social media usage affects mindset and energy. Discussions of Naval’s Twitter usage and utilizing it as an outlet for his unfiltered thoughts and ideas. 21:56 - What were the communication patterns between Naval and Eric during the creation of The Almanack? 24:05 - The variety and depth of Naval’s ideas. Eric allowed himself to take time to dive in and explore these topics to let them sink in before writing about it. 26:02 - One topic that didn’t make the final cut was Education. Naval has talked about the flaws within the education system as well as the future of education. If you’re curious to read more, you can find that here! The rise of online courses and the potential for digital course creators. When you’re learning locally, you have the best person in the area teaching you. When you’re learning on a platform that’s global, you’ll be learning from the best of the best, plus increased accessibility. 32:44 - The future of online learning and career preparation is promising. How will the online course market grow within the upcoming decades? Tiktok education in the format of 60 second videos shot from your phone. 37:45 - English as the language of business and the history of the qwerty keyboard. 40:50 - If Eric could write about another influencer of thought, who would it be? 42:10 - Elon Musk, PayPal, Tesla, SpaceX. Writing a biography about Elon Musk: he has a hefty list of accomplishments but his principles and concepts are timeless. 48:24 - What do we know about Naval’s relationships and family? His ideas and concepts are what he is widely known for, so not much is known about his personal life. 53:53 - Eric’s next steps includes creating a course to help build a framework on this idea of leverage that Naval often speaks about. 57:01 - Leverage can be utilized at a personal, managerial, and company level in many different ways. Productivity of a company is no longer about how many employees there are. People leverage. 1:01:59 - Pick up a copy of The Almanack of Naval Ravikant on Amazon, follow Eric on Twitter, visit navalmanack.com, and follow along with upcoming projects on Eric's website! If you enjoyed this episode, let us know by leaving a review on iTunes and tell a friend. As always, let us know if you have any book recommendations! Find us on Twitter @TheRealNeilS and @nateliason. The best way to stay up to date on future episodes and show updates is to join our email list at Made You Think Podcast. Check out ways you can support the show here!
1 hr 3 min
The Tech Talks Daily Podcast
The Tech Talks Daily Podcast
Neil C. Hughes
1466: An AI Recommendation Engine for Technical Support
When something goes wrong, tech teams don't have the luxury of logging a support ticket. When I heard about Peritus, an AI recommendation for technical support, I felt compelled to find out more. Robin Purohit is the co-founder and CEO of Peritus.ai, a Bay area startup that is tackling technical support for developers and engineers. He was previously a senior executive at BMC and HP Software, where he led multi-billion dollar business units for IT management, application delivery, and security. AI chatbots for customer support are getting significant attention and investment in industries ranging from retail to financial services to employee help desks. However, an important area neglected is support for engineers and developers who are driving IT innovation. These technical users have little patience for pre-wired chatbots without industry context and view opening a support ticket as the last resort. Instead, they look for insights from trusted experts on Community Forums, such as Stack Overflow or vendor-sponsored communities. When done well, community forums can create both user loyalty and deflect costly support cases. Peritus, an AI recommendation engine for support automation, recently announced the results of its first IT Industry Forum Benchmark that examined over 12 million posts and responses on over 50 leading IT industry forums for vendors and open source technologies such as Cisco, MongoDB, and Kubernetes. The benchmark study zeroed in on four key metrics: * The number of posts that were resolved * How quickly the average length to resolve each post was resolved. * Whether posts were resolved by the first response, * How many experts answered the bulk of the questions.
19 min
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