ArtCurious Podcast
ArtCurious Podcast
Jan 18, 2021
Episode #76: Art Auction Audacity-- O'Keeffe's Jimson Weed/White Flower #1 (Season 8, Episode 8)
Play • 29 min

In our eighth season, we’re exploring examples of some of the most expensive artworks ever sold at auction considering why they garnered so much money, and discovering their backstories. Today, our season finale: Georgia O’Keeffe’s Jimson Weed/White Flower #1 .

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Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Louise Fletcher/Alice Sheridan
Loose Representation & Disrupted Realism with Gabriel Lipper [109]
This week, we are joined by representational painter Gabriel Lipper who has been painting professionally for over 20 years and teaching for more than 15 years. In this conversation, we discuss Gabe's transition from classical figurative work to a much looser style that brings in elements of abstraction and he shares his reasoning for making this move. During our chat, we learn about Gabe's passion for daily drawing an, his desire to portray the beauty of our world, and his commitment to sharing more of himself in his work. (We also discover that Alice has an aversion to the word "sketch!") Gabe is about to teach his "Learning to See" course, which ran for the first time last year, and we discuss both the course content and his experience of teaching it. Finally, we share two inspirational artists for you to check out. Mentioned: Get access to the Learning to See free workshop classes HERE Perfect for exploring that hybrid between realism and abstraction Learning to See course is now open (end Feb 2021) Gabe would love you to watch the free classes first which you can do on the link above. Find out more about joining the full program  HERE Gabe's website Roger Cecil: A Secret Artist  Raimonds Staprans: Full Spectrum (out of print) Find our websites:  _www.alicesheridan.com__ _ www.louisefletcherart.com Follow us on Instagram: @alicesheridanstudio  @louisefletcher_art "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
52 min
The Great Women Artists
The Great Women Artists
Katy Hessel
Elizabeth Smith on Helen Frankenthaler
WELCOME BACK TO SEASON 5 of the GWA PODCAST! In episode 53 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the renowned curator and executive director of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Elizabeth Smith, on the trailblazing and legendary HELEN FRANKENTHALER (1928–2011) !!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] With a career spanning six decades, Helen Frankenthaler has long been recognized as one of the great American artists of the twentieth century. A member of the second generation of postwar American abstract painters, she is widely credited with playing a pivotal role in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Color Field painting. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, she expanded the possibilities of abstraction, while at times referencing figuration and landscape in highly personal ways. She produced a body of work whose impact on contemporary art has been profound and continues to grow. Born on December 12, 1928, and raised in New York. She attended the Dalton School, where she received her earliest art instruction from Rufino Tamayo. In 1949 she graduated from Bennington College, and by the early 1950s had entered into the Downtown New York Art Scene. Exhibiting at the infamous Ninth Street Show in 1951 (alongside Krasner, Mitchell, and others), Frankenthaler's breakthrough came in 1952 when she created Mountains and Sea, her first soak-stain painting. She poured thinned paint directly onto raw, unprimed canvas laid on the studio floor, working from all sides to create floating fields of translucent colour. The work catalysed the Colour Field School and was particularly influential for artists of her generation. In 1959, Frankenthaler had won first prize at the Premiere Biennale de Paris, by 1960 had her first major solo exhibition at the Jewish Museum in New York, and by 1969 was one of four artists to represent America at the Venice Biennale. Oh! AND she had a Whitney Museum solo exhibition of the same year. She was invisible. I LOVED recording this episode with Elizabeth Smith about the fascinating life and work of Frankenthaler. ENJOY!!! Works discussed: Nature Abhors a Vacuum, 1973 Cloud Burst, 2002 Pink Lady, 1963 Mountains and Sea, 1952 Jacob's Ladder, 1957 Flood, 1967 FURTHER LINKS! https://www.frankenthalerfoundation.org/artworks/paintings https://www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/2021/may/helen-frankenthaler-radical-beauty/ https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/Helen-Frankenthaler https://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-modern/display/studio/helen-frankenthaler https://gagosian.com/news/museum-exhibitions/pittura-panorama-paintings-by-helen-frankenthaler-museo-di-palazzo-grimani-venice/ Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Laura Hendry Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/
49 min
The Modern Art Notes Podcast
The Modern Art Notes Podcast
Tyler Green
Baseera Khan, Futurefarmers
Episode No. 486 features artists Baseera Khan and Amy Franceschini of Futurefarmers. Kahn and Futurefarmers are among the artists included in "Climate Changing: On Artists, Institutions, and the Social Environment" at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio through May 9. The exhibition looks at how artists engage with social issues and how they may shape institutions at a time when both racism and a global pandemic have caused many institutions to re-consider their construction and practices. The exhibition was curated by Lucy I. Zimmerman. "Climate Changing" features nine artworks commissioned by the Wexner, including work Torkwase Dyson discussed on the program last September. Baseera Khan addresses colonial histories, exile, place and displacement, and belonging within the context of capitalism and its impacts. Their work takes many forms, including performance, sculpture and, soon, a TV pilot produced during a recent residency at The Kitchen in New York City. Later this year they will have their first museum solo exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. Futurefarmers is an ever-changing design studio and collective that supports art projects and research interests. Founded in 1995 by Amy Franceschini, the group has focused on using projects to propose alternatives to present social, political and environmental constructs. Futurefarmers' project "Seed Journey" is included in "Climate Changing." Initiated in 2016, "Seed Journey" is a collaboration between Futurefarmers and local farmers and scholars to return heirloom grain seeds to their native lands. It began with a voyage from Oslo, Norway to Belgium, and expanded in subsequent years to include other seeds, nations and continents.
1 hr 5 min
The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes
Paul Holdengräber, dublab Radio, Onassis Foundation LA
The Quarantine Tapes 165: Sanford Biggers
On episode 165 of The Quarantine Tapes, guest host Imani Perry is joined by Sanford Biggers. Sanford is an artist working across a wide range of disciplines. He talks with Imani about some of his recent work with quilting, describing how he came to that medium and talking about the cultural and historical elements of that work. Imani asks Sanford about his beginnings in art and about the range of his work, from sculpture to music to textiles. Sanford offers a brilliant view into his process as an artist, talking about creating pieces that speak to police brutality, remixing classical European and African art, and the kinship between hip hop and quilting. Sanford Biggers’ work is an interplay of narrative, perspective and history that speaks to current social, political and economic happenings while also examining the contexts that bore them. His diverse practice positions him as a collaborator with the past through explorations of often overlooked cultural and political narratives from American history. Working with antique quilts that echo rumors of their use as signposts on the Underground Railroad, he engages these legends and contributes to this narrative by drawing and painting directly onto them. In response to ongoing occurrences of police brutality against Black Americans, Biggers’ BAM series is composed of bronze sculptures recast from fragments of wooden African statues that have been anonymized through dipping in wax and then ballistically ‘resculpted’. Following a residency as a 2017 American Academy Fellow in Rome, the artist recently began working in marble. Drawing on and playing with the tradition of working in this medium, Biggers creates hybridized forms that transpose, combine and juxtapose classical and historical subjects to create alternative meanings and produce what he calls “future ethnographies”. As creative director and keyboardist, he fronts Moon Medicin, a multimedia concept band that straddles visual art and music with performances staged against a backdrop of curated sound effects and video. Moon Medicin performed at Open Spaces Kansas City in October 2018 and at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. in 2019.
32 min
Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood
Savvy Painter Podcast with Antrese Wood
Conversations about the business of art, inside the artist studio, and plei
Bringing Art to Life: An Interview with Artist, Nicholas Wilton
Have you struggled with integrating the various aspects of your day to day into a workflow that respects your responsibilities AND your passion for art? How do you avoid burning out and feeling like you’ve wasted too much of your life? If you’ve ever wondered if there was a way to truly bring your art to all aspects of your life - you’ve come to the right place! Here to help me dive into this critical topic that burdens so many of us is my friend and fellow artist, Nicholas Wilton. Hailing from San Francisco, California, Nicholas studied art at the College of Creative Studies in Santa Barbara and then went on to receive his BFA from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. Wilton’s paintings are seen in yearly gallery exhibitions, International Art Fairs, and are included in numerous private and corporate collections in both the United States and Europe. Nicholas is also the founder of Art2Life, an online platform that strives to build, empower, and inspire the creative community. I can’t wait for you to get to know my engaging and insightful friend as he helps us explore what it really means to bring our art to life - you don’t want to miss it! What is ART2LIFE? Thousands of artists listen to and believe this lie every day and they walk away from the passion and energy that set them on their creative path - what is the lie? You aren’t good enough. You’ll never make it. No one wants to buy your art. Only the supremely talented can make any money off of their art. Do any of these lines sound familiar? What if there was a way to silence those lies that swirl around and re-train your mindset? With his Art2Life program, Nicholas strives to build, empower, and inspire the creative community. Nicholas wants to flip the script and help us shift our focus away from competition to sharing. His program is all about finding what inspires and brings you joy, and making art that is more and more like yourself. The process of becoming yourself If you’ve been around the Savvy Painter community for very long, you know that I am passionate about empowering artists like you to fully realize your potential and chase after your dreams. It’s been so encouraging to meet and speak with artists like Nicholas who have dedicated their lives to their craft but to also helping others discover the joy of creative fulfillment. If you find yourself wondering if you’ll ever be able to talk about your art like Nicholas does - STOP! Remember, this isn’t about who you can be most like, it’s about discovering the real YOU. Give yourself patience and space to continue the process of discovery - we are all works in progress! Pay attention to your energy and mindset While it might sound silly, the truth is, the energy you bring to your studio matters. Maybe for you, it is all about that cup of coffee or maybe it’s about getting in an early morning run - the actions we take before we decide to sit down and create can have a huge impact on our artwork! As you continue to explore this critical topic with Nicholas, I encourage you to begin paying attention to what you are doing, why you are doing it, and how it is impacting your creative process - the result might surprise you! Outline of This Episode * [0:25] I introduce my guest, Nicholas Wilton. * [4:00] Nicholas talks about the moment when everything came crashing down. * [8:00] Setting intentions and turning over a new leaf. * [11:00] What is, “ART2LIFE?” * [15:00] Why the world needs YOUR art. * [20:30] The process of becoming yourself. * [28:45] Nicholas opens up about “getting stuck.” * [33:30] Pay attention to the energy you want to bring to the studio. * [37:00] How you can learn from Nicholas’ innovative approach. * [40:30] Closing thoughts. Resources Mentioned on this episode * www.nicholaswilton.com * www.art2life.com * Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain Connect With Antrese * On Facebook * On Pinterest * On Instagram * On Twitter
48 min
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
Kelton Reid
How Award-Winning True Crime Writer Kali White VanBaale Writes
#PodcastersForJustice Award-winning novelist and creative writing professor, Kali White VanBaale, chatted with me about the transition from literary fiction to true crime, her work with the PEN America Prison & Justice Writing program, and taking chances. Kali is an award-winning, Iowa-based author of novels, short stories, and essays. Her novel The Space Between (penned as Kali VanBaale), won an American Book Award, an Independent Publisher’s silver medal for fiction, and was winner of the Fred Bonnie First Novel Award. Her latest is The Monsters We Make (as Kali White), a mystery loosely based on the real-life unsolved "Des Moines paperboy abductions" of the early ‘80s. Pulitzer Prize finalist Lee Martin, author of The Bright Forever, said, “[The Monsters We Make] ... kept me on the edge of my seat. I truly did read this remarkable new novel in one sitting.” Kali is a regular contributor to the A&E Network Real Crime blog series, and her short stories and essays have appeared in The Coachella Review, The Chaffey Review, Midwestern Gothic, Nowhere Magazine, Poets&Writers, The Writers’ Chronicle and others. If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews. In this file Kali White VanBaale and I discussed: * The challenges writers had to overcome in 2020 * Her advocacy for social justice through writing * How to cut yourself off from the rabbit hole of research * On writing what scares you * Why writers need to lean on revision * And more! At the break I've got a special segment with an inspiring young non-fiction writer you won't want to miss. Hint: She is an influencer, author, artist, and tech-savvy 10-year-old. Stay calm and write on … Show Notes: * KaliWhite.com * The Monsters We Make: A Novel by Kali White * Past Ten * PEN America Prison & Justice Writing * The Paperboy Abduction Cases: The Legacy of Two Des Moines Boys Who Are Still Missing * Kali White VanBaale on Facebook * Kali White VanBaale on Instagram * Kali White VanBaale on Twitter * Kelton Reid on Twitter _____ Prisha Hedau is a 10-year-old from Louisville, KY, and the author of PANDEMIC 2020: A 9 Year Old's Perspective. Prisha is an elementary student who holds USA state and USA national level ranking in Chess and Math Kangaroo competitions. She's also a budding philanthropist with a big heart! In this file Prisha Hedau and I talked about: * The importance of note taking * Staying positive through tough times * Her favorite book * And how she helps the less fortunate I know the audio is little rough, but it's an inspiring story. Show Notes: * PrishaHedau.com * PANDEMIC 2020: A 9 Year Old's Perspective by Prisha Hedau
42 min
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library: Shakespeare Unlimited
Folger Shakespeare Library
Shakespeare in the Harlem Renaissance
When you think about the Harlem Renaissance, theater might not be the first thing that comes to mind. But, says Dr. Freda Scott Giles, theater played a significant role in the blossoming of Black American arts and culture of the 1920s and '30s. Of course, because there’s little in the English-language theater untouched by Shakespeare, he was present in the Harlem Renaissance too. Banner Shakespeare productions included Orson Welles’s hit “Voodoo” "Macbeth," produced by the Federal Theater Project, and the "Midsummer"-inspired "Swingin’ the Dream," which was a Broadway flop despite the talents of musician Louis Armstrong and comedian Moms Mabley. We talk to Dr. Giles about how the artists and thinkers of the Harlem Renaissance regarded the Bard. Plus, we visit the African Company of the 1820s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s to learn about more than a century of Black responses to Shakespeare. Freda Scott Giles is Associate Professor Emerita of Theater at the University of Georgia. She was a contributor to three books: "Tarell Alvin McCraney: Theater, Performance, and Collaboration," published in 2020; "Constructions of Race in Southern Theatre: From Federalism to the Federal Theatre Project," published in 2003; and "American Mixed Race: The Culture of Microdiversity," which was published in 1995. From the Shakespeare Unlimited podcast. Published February 16, 2021. © Folger Shakespeare Library. All rights reserved. This podcast episode, “I Here Engage My Words,” was produced by Richard Paul. Garland Scott is the associate producer. It was edited by Gail Kern Paster. Ben Lauer is the web producer, with help from Leonor Fernandez. We had technical help from Andrew Feliciano and Paul Luke at Voice Trax West in Studio City, California.
34 min
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